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2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Peng, Kun. "Who Will be Your e-Doctor? Testing DeAndrea and Carpenter’s Measure of Warranting Theory on e-Doctor" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1230897_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper seeks to examine how the perception of information manipulation may influence one’s evaluation of an e-Doctor. There are two primary aims of this study: a) to replicate DeAndrea and Carpenter’s test of warranting theory on e-Doctor in the era of e-Health; b) to verify the role of three information manipulation approaches, including modification control, dissemination control, and source obfuscation control, in one’s appraisal of an e- Doctor. An online experiment was conducted in 2016. Results revealed that there was a negative correlation between perception of information manipulation likelihood and evaluation of e-Doctor. However, there was no significant difference between high-level control and low- level control groups in the source obfuscation control model. Other influential factors towards the evaluation of an e-Doctor were also discussed.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 5963 words || 
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2. Miller, Ann., Mwithia, Kinya., Booker, Nancy., Kizito, Mary. and Ngula, Kyalo. "The Relationship of Doctor Ethnicity and Doctor-Patient Ethnic Concordance to Patient-Provider Communication in Nairobi, Kenya" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p408351_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In order to examine the role of ethnicity in the patient-provider communication in Kenya we surveyed 221 participants and conducted 8 focus groups with low- and middle-income urban women in both urban and rural locations. Findings indicated that in the view of patients doctor ethnicity was not a major factor in shaping doctor-patient communication. However, additional research is needed to elaborate on findings regarding negative implications of patient-provider concordance.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 7460 words || 
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3. Tang, Lu. and Guan, Mengfei. "Culture and Doctor-Patient Communication in China: The Doctor’s Perspective" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714095_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Most of the existing studies on doctor-patient communication are conducted in Western countries and marked by a Eurocentric bias, such as the assumption of individualism, autonomy, and rationality. Presented here is an exploratory study of doctor-patient communication in China. Interviews and surveys of twenty four doctors in China show that doctors consider themselves as both saviors and victims. This conflicted professional identity affects how doctors perceive doctor-patient relationship and how they communicate with their patients. By exploring the dialectical tensions in doctor-patient communication, this study demonstrates how doctor-patient communication in China is situated within the larger social and cultural context of the country and how the mismatch between the culture of the newly privatized medical system and the traditional culture of China is a major cause of the strained doctor-patient relationship in the country.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 149 words || 
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4. Librett, Mitch. and Perrone, Dina. "Every cop a doctor; every doctor a cop" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1148843_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Labeled “the opioid epidemic”, a disturbing uptick in the number of accidental overdose events has plunged the US to the depths of yet another moral panic, disturbingly similar to the fear of the “superpredator” accompanied by the panic generated by pseudoscientific research in the latter part of the 1980s, which argued that use of “crack cocaine” just once caused instant addiction. We are once again on the cusp of a media-generated panic that has already had significant consequences that will be difficult-if not impossible-to reverse.
We will show how a combination of purely descriptive statistics, manipulation of the public sentiment, and fear of “the other” have created dangerous solutions to problems that have already been solved, yet failed to address the real issue of the widespread availability of cheap and exceedingly pure heroin. In these uncharted waters- every physician becomes a cop, and every cop a doctor.

2018 - Comparative and International Education Society Conference Words: 689 words || 
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5. Yao, Christina. and Sinclair, Julie. "Re-shaping the doctoral curriculum: The imperative for the internationalization of doctoral education" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Conference, Hilton Mexico City Reforma Hotel, Mexico City, Mexico, Mar 25, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-04-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1353295_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Objectives
In this scholarly paper, we argue for the need to focus on internationalizing the doctoral curriculum in the United States. Current efforts on internationalizing curriculum emphasize undergraduate education, including study abroad and globally-focused coursework. In addition, several U.S. national associations call for increasing global learning for undergraduate students (e.g., Association of American Colleges and Universities, American Council on Education, Association of Public and Land Grant Universities); however, the role of doctoral education is missing from the overall national discourse with the exception of some summit proceedings by the Council of Graduate Schools (2007, 2010, 2012) that call for the internationalization of graduate education. Yet little guidance is provided on how to internationalization doctoral education.
Despite the heavy international influence on academic scholarship, many doctoral programs provide limited training and support for global competency development and international scholarship (Author, 2016). There is a call for higher education institutions to prepare graduates to work in “cross cultural, globally diverse settings” (Gopal, 2011, p. 374), which would enable them to successfully participate in the economic and knowledge economy that are integral to a global society and international markets. Global competency development is critical because doctoral students are future faculty, senior administrators, and policy makers in education (NASULGC, 2004). Contemporary academia is increasingly international; thus, doctoral students should develop global competencies that reflect the changing nature of education.
Internationalization encompasses many broad aspects, including international student mobility, global quality standards, and short term study abroad; however, for this specific paper, we address the need for “internationalisation at home” (Haigh, 2014, p. 13), which encompasses the development of intercultural skills for local learners. In this scholarly paper, we utilize Lattuca and Stark’s (2009) academic planning model as a way to frame a systematic approach to internationalizing doctoral curriculum. As a result, we seek to contribute to the gap in literature related to developing global competencies in doctoral students.

Theoretical Framework
Latucca and Stark’s (2009) academic plan framework situates curriculum within two crucial environments – external influences and internal, or institutional, influences. We suggest that both environments are critical in understanding how doctoral education is internationalized, as well as providing clarity on what the obstacles may be. Disciplinary differences, individual institutional structures, and academic program level policies may all impact how a curriculum initiative is implemented and carried out, as well as what may hinder that initiative. A NASULGC task force emphasized that “Unfortunately, a well-developed international mindset is rare among new Ph.D. graduate and many faculty because the interdisciplinary, intercultural, and diverse experiential aspects do not fit the focused disciplinary nature of typical Ph.D. programs” (Allen, 2004, p. 24). Thus, we address the need for a well-developed international mindset by highlighting the external and internal influences that push for a curricular emphasis on global learning in doctoral students.
The sociocultural context, which include external and internal influences, drives the actual implementation of the academic planning model. Elements included in Lattuca and Stark’s (2009) academic plan model are: purposes, content, sequence, learners, instructional processes, instructional resources, evaluation, and adjustment. We will discuss how the sociocultural context affects these eight elements in our final paper, and we will provide recommendations for practice at the institutional and programmatic levels.

Scholarly Significance
This paper contributes to scholarship in several important ways. First, it addresses a critical gap in the research and discussion related to internationalization of postsecondary curriculum by highlighting the importance of a focus on doctoral education. Second, doctoral education lacks a common curriculum across disciplines, such as general education at the undergraduate level. The use of Lattuca and Stark’s (2009) academic plan provides a framework for discussion of curriculum internationalization at the doctoral level. The academic plan model provides not only a path for building curriculum, it also highlights the institutional and external factors that may support or inhibit curricular change and that are important to understand in attempting to internationalize doctoral education. Finally, this paper makes a significant contribution to scholarship in arguing for the need to not only have institution-wide discussions about curriculum internationalization at the undergraduate level but also as a part of doctoral education.

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