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2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 14524 words || 
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1. XU, Yaping. "Televised Documentary-Testimonies as Strategic Propaganda: A Case Study on Four ‘Comfort Women’ Documentary-Series of STV" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p980652_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper provides an archival research on the embodiment of oral testimonies on the television screen, and investigates on the self-presentational form and style about the oral testimonies and their underlying rationale. Specifically the paper looks into four oral-history documentaries in which the survived 'comfort women' (or the female sexual slaves that underwent sexual violence during the Second World War in the Asian battlefields) articulate their traumatic/un-representable life-experiences through somatic ways of embodiment instead of semantic languages. Basing on that, this paper argues that the production on the oral testimony of the television station is resulted from the change of publicity strategies of the state-owned media towards marketization and international communication since the early 1990s.

2006 - American Studies Association Words: 489 words || 
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2. Rabinowitz, Paula. "Shutterings, Endings and Autopsies: Towards a Poetics of the Post-Industrial Documentary" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, <Not Available>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p105814_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In Pare Lorentz’s 1936 documentary THE PLOW THAT BROKE THE PLAIN, the narrator intones the deprivation caused by land that is exhausted by over farming and drought. The inhabitants, like the soil itself, are “blowed out,” scattered to the winds, leaving a decimated landscape and a demoralized population. This elegiac paean to loss stood in stark contrast to the heroic images of sturdy industrial workers struggling to maintain their jobs through unionization during the Depression era. Industry may also have been “blowed out” by the financial crisis of the 1930s, but the image of the worker, developed in such classics as Lewis Hine’s heroic MEN AT WORK, on the one hand, or Dorothea Lange’s poignant picture “White Angel Breadline,” on the other, conveyed social bonds and solidarity—if only in the form a mass of homeless and hungry unemployed men.

The era of post-industrialism has produced a unique reworking of the devastated agricultural locations of the 1930s, as workers become the absence haunting the skeletal forms of industrial detritus left when factories close shop. In works of poetry, fiction, memoir, photography, oral history and film, one finds a recurrent incantation of mourning. Mark Nowak’s documentary poems and photographs in SHUT UP SHUT DOWN record closure, emptiness, despair in the Upper Midwest. Lolita Hernandez’s short stories in AUTOPSY OF AN ENGINE record the final moment of a Detroit General Motors plant as the last Cadillac rolls off the line, echoing Rich Feldman’s oral histories of displaced autoworkers in THE END OF THE LINE. Michael Frisch and Milton Rogovin offer defiant PORTRAITS IN STEEL, but, also, like the films of Tony Buba, trace the loss of work as Pittsburgh mills are downsized.

These works are linked to a transnational aesthetic connecting the efforts of Michael Moore to document the destruction of his hometown, Flint, Michigan, in ROGER & ME to the work of Thomas Lahusen detailing the end of Sakhalin, Russia. Wang Bing’s nine-hour video documentary TIEXI DISTRICT: WEST OF THE TRACKS lingers over the industrial ruins in China’s northeast. Like the paintings by Ed Ruscha of non-descript and now non-functional industrial and warehouse buildings, or the industrial photographs of Bernd and Hilla Becker, or memorial installations throughout post-1989 Eastern Europe, the images evoke a complex nostalgic pull for a lost world of power—whether state capitalist or market capital—that no longer has use for these behemoths.

Capital is not in crisis, however, under this new regime of post-industrial iconography; nor is the poetics of emptying factories the result of nature or war’s destruction. The images are remnants of abandonment, of progress. Stories of loss, ruin—the fallout of leaving. This paper explores a poetics of post-industrialism in its various sites as a reworking of iconic images gleaned from the 1930s of workers and the dust bowl, tracing how closure and abandonment is a form of violence meriting its own rhetoric.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 15 pages || Words: 8250 words || 
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3. Ehrlich, Matthew. "Radio Utopia: Promoting Public Interest in a 1940s Radio Documentary" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p230242_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Historical studies can be powerful means for enhancing critical understanding of journalism. This study examines an acclaimed 1947 American radio documentary as an example of utopian journalism aligning with the interests of powerful individuals and institutions. CBS’s The Eagle’s Brood, written by Robert Lewis Shayon, advocated the grassroots-organizing philosophy of Saul Alinsky as a solution to juvenile delinquency. If in that way the documentary aimed at promoting the public interest, CBS also used radio research to promote and gauge interest in the documentary itself. Finally, the program promoted the image of CBS as serving the public interest at a time when the broadcasting industry faced increased regulatory scrutiny. CBS largely abandoned its radio documentaries soon afterward and Shayon was blacklisted. Still, The Eagle’s Brood provides a historical example of corporate media granting airtime to an alternative journalistic form and presenting an altruistic view of Americans confronting and solving their problems.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 38 pages || Words: 11631 words || 
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4. Ashuri, Tamar. "Negotiating Distances: The Cultural Economy of Television Documentaries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p232993_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This article considers the moral and ethical implications of television representation in a global age. It focuses on the role of the television industry in challenging and changing the distance between the remote and proximate, the foreign and familiar. The emphasis is on the institutional processes that enable as well as circumscribe these sorts of presentations. At the core are economic collaborations for the making of television documentaries made by television practitioners of different nations/cultures. In this space of social and political communication the collaborating parties who are geographically, materially, and culturally distant from each other negotiate these distances, as well as the distances between the subjects being presented (the alien viewed) and their audience (the distant viewers).The method applied is ‘participant observation’. The focal point of this approach is on an annual event — The Israeli Forum of CoProductions — at which producers from different countries hammer out collaborations. Findings show that the interlocutors are designing the distance between the strange and familiar, the distant and near — challenging and changing it, while simultaneously preserving and perpetuating it.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 30 pages || Words: 11274 words || 
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5. Livio, Oren. "Battling for Survival: The Documentary Series 'Tkuma' and Israeli Military Discourse" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p259004_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper I examine the ways in which the controversial Israeli documentary series "Tkuma" constructed relations between the Israeli military and civil society. Focusing on the complex interactions between dominant and critical elements in the series’ discourse, I identify three frames through which military-society relations were viewed: the paradigm of reactivity (the military acting only in reaction to attack), the paradigm of purity (the moral character of military actions), and the paradigm of liminality (the fluid, indefinite nature of borders between the military and civil spheres). Implications for perceptions of the role of the military in society are discussed.

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