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2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9328 words || 
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1. Nurse, Angela. "Racializaiton of Dress: How Race Acts as a Structuring Ideology for Fashion and Dress" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1379823_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The intersection of race and dress is often is dominated by how either resist or to conform to dominant constructs of beauty through hairstyling and emblematic clothing to achieve a defined social aim, such as a political agenda or social cache and capital. My research on contemporary dress practices of a diverse group of women at a large Midwestern university challenges this dichotomy and poses a new theoretical framework for the intersection of race and dress. Interviews with 36 collegiate women revealed that although they did not use dress to challenge racialized beauty norms or dress in ways to maximize social gain, race impacted their dress behavior in myriad of other ways. Race was evident in their clothing choices, impacted the spheres of influence on their dress behavior, shaped how they viewed dress, expectations for dress, and how they assessed the appropriate attire. As a result, I posit that race has a much more insidious relationship to dress behavior than dressing to achieve an explicit agenda. I argue that race acts as a structuring ideology for how women experience and perceive fashion and dress. Race not only has a discursive relationship to clothing but also creates symbolic boundaries to define spheres of influence.

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Pages: 7 pages || Words: 2763 words || 
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2. Conway, Daniel. and Weldes, Jutta. "Dressed for the Occasion: Post-War British Diplomacy and the Dresses of Elizabeth II" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p314096_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Elizabeth I, reputed to have owned over 3000 dresses, was noted for her gowns, which consciously represented both English nationalism and the majesty of the English monarchy. Margaret Thatcher had a diplomatic wardrobe expressly designed so that she would

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5511 words || 
Info
3. Tabatabai, Ahoo. "Dress and Desire: The Use of Dress in Narratives of Sexual Identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p561836_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The importance of one’s dress in interaction with others cannot be overstated. In part, people communicate who they are through their appearance, making clothing, hairstyles and jewelry choice key elements in self-presentation. Dress is much more than just a marker for personal likes and dislikes. It is a significant source of identity performance. This article examines the ways in which sexual identity is performed and displayed in dress. To this end, I examine the narratives of 32 lesbian, queer, and bisexual women who were once partnered with women and now are partnered with men. Dress is an important way in which the women in this study navigate the change to a partner of a different gender. Because there is a connection between sex, gender, desire and dress, dress can be used as a tool to tell a particular story about the events that lead to change in partners and the events that follow a change in partners. But how the women in this study use dress is not simple. The way each woman uses dress to navigate the change to a partner of a different gender is dependent on what kind of story she wishes to tell about her self. In the case of this study, the women tell stories of continuation, regardless of their identities prior to becoming involved with men. They seek to be read as the “same person.”

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