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2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 252 words || 
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1. Parson, Sean. and Ray, Emily. "Drill Baby Drill: Labor and the Sexualization of Resource Extraction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 31, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1257336_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The oil fields of North America are primarily worked by men in temporary jobs. This work of extraction is environmentally degrading and affirming of a destructive relationship between humans and nature, wherein the land is considered exclusively for its exchange value on the marketplace in an industry prone to severe fluctuations and short-term planning. Ecofeminist Ariel Salleh argues that patriarchy is a foundational aspect of capitalism, and therefore we can draw connections between the exploitation of women and of the environment. The exploitative relationship to women is evident in the attempt at gender parity offered by the oil industry, which sits uneasily beside the drastic uptick in sexual and domestic violence towards indigenous women living near and working in the temporary labor towns dubbed “man camps.” In addition, to convince the public of the ethical virtue of tar sands, corporations have begun an ad campaign including sexualized ads that use the male fantasy of lesbians to sell oil, by contrasting it with the Saudi regime. Women’s surplus labor in the Bakken is typically underrepresented, including domestic and sexual labor, but it is central to capitalist accumulation in the oil fields. Drawing from ecofeminist and Marxist scholarship (Federici 2004), which allows us to account for gender in the exploitation of land and labor, this project points towards a sexual logic of domination that drives the oil industry’s relationship to labor and land. We argue this logic must be addressed in order to seriously resolve the related problems of land use and gendered violence.

2009 - WPSA ANNUAL MEETING "Ideas, Interests and Institutions" Pages: 25 pages || Words: 8084 words || 
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2. Forbis, Robert. "Drill, Baby, Drill: An Analysis of How Energy Development Displaced Ranching's Dominance of the BLM's Land-Use Subgovernment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the WPSA ANNUAL MEETING "Ideas, Interests and Institutions", Hyatt Regency Vancouver, BC Canada, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Mar 19, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p316811_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Academic literature analyzing the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land-use subgovernment stops at the Taylor Grazing Act and concludes that the historical development of administering grazing on public lands led to the capture of the BLM by ranching interests. Using a two-pronged methodological approach of process tracing and elite interviews this dissertation seeks to advance our collective knowledge of subgovernment theory by a) clarifying the impact executive decision-making has on subgovernments and b) identifying the conditions under which strategically competitive behavior between two competing subgovernment actors occurs. The dissertation seeks to update the literature by explaining what has caused the BLM to shift from a rancher-dominated agency to an energy dominated agency by identifying conditions under which subgovernment actors strategically responded to a political conflict.

The research poses two questions: 1) how have executive actions disrupted an existing balance of power in a so-called “strong corner” of an entrenched subgovernment system, and 2) what happens when conflict and competition break out between allied members of the system? Analysis indicates that as the BLM responded to Executive actions emphasizing domestic energy production, a conflict emerged between traditional allies: ranching and energy.

Triggered by the unintended consequence of awakening long-dormant legislation, split-estate energy development—where property rights are severed between private surface and federal mineral estates—expanded across the West. In turn, this expansion helped establish the conditions for conflict and in doing so disrupted the balance of power between large public resource use interests in the relatively stable land-use subgovernment of the BLM.

Indicative of energy’s emerging dominance of the BLM’s subgovernment, split-estate energy development led ranching interests to seek the protection of their Western state legislatures. This shift in domination led to a series of fiercely competitive political responses between the formerly allied interest groups.

Findings indicate that as the political conflict intensified it became clear that the BLM’s land-use policies were no longer dominated by ranching interests, but were now dominated by energy development interests. The analysis concludes that this shift in domination disproves the long accepted conclusion that the BLM is forever an agency captured by ranching interests and that subgovernments are beyond the control of the President.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Words: 101 words || 
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3. Hughes, Llewelyn. "Drill Baby Drill! Ideology, Interests, and Congressional Voting on US Oil Production" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p498922_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Stigler motivates his classic study of regulatory capture of the state using the example of government intervention in the U.S. oil industry. Yet the importance of the material interests, in terms of votes or campaign contributions from the oil industry, relative to an ideological commitment of members of Congress to increasing crude production at home in the name of energy security, has not been tested systematically. In this paper I use congressional votes on major legislation designed to increase domestic drilling as a share of demand to test the relative importance of ideology and material interests in determining Congressional voting outcomes.

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