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2013 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 152 words || 
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1. Cyril, Jasmin. "Dynastic Identity in Renaissance Court Life: Dynastic Privilege in Portraits of Children" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Sheraton Hotel and Marina, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-11-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p602460_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Late Quattrocento and early Cinquecento portraits of Renaissance court family life both underscored the significance of the dynastic legacy of the family implicit in the heraldry and placement of images of privileged children as well as introduced an element of familial association that determined the future of the court itself. Painters and sculptors in the employ of the dukes and counts of central and Northern Renaissance courts utilized the trope of the interconnectedness of an extended privileged family as introduced by Augustus in the Ara Pacis Augustae (13-9 BCE, Rome). Andrea Mantegna in the environmentally frescoed Camera Picta, Ducal Palace (Mantua, 1465–74) framed the minor family members of the family of Ludovico Gonzaga and Barbara von Hollenzollern in a setting that emphasized their dominion over both the physical space of the palazzo, the contado under their political control, and their entry into the principate of the Church hierarchy.

2014 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 151 words || 
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2. O'Leary, Jessica. "Hypergamous Marriage and Princely Rule: Dynastic Networks and Political Negotiation in the Letters of Eleonora d’Aragona and Ercole d’Este (1477–93)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, New York, NY, Hilton New York, <Not Available>. 2019-11-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p677845_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The political instability and limited influence of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Northern Italian princely states often permitted consorts to govern in their absent husbands’ stead. There is a burgeoning field of historical inquiry that sheds new light on this deputizing role of princely consorts and how they mediated their position in relation to their husbands. Until recently, historians have underestimated the influence of inherited traditions of female rulership on the role of consort. Eleonora d’Aragona (1450–93) is an excellent example of this influence in action. Eleonora inherited the Aragonese tradition of the Queens-Lieutenant and used it to interpret her role as occasional de facto ruler and wife of Ercole d’Este, Duke of Ferrara. This paper will use the letters exchanged between spouses, and their familial and courtly networks, to demonstrate how the epistolary medium could establish a co-rulership agreement in Ferrara based on the diplomatic power and political acumen Eleonora’s heritage represented.

2015 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 230 words || 
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3. Breuker, Remco. "There Can Be Only One: Dealing with Plural Dynastic Legacies in the Koryŏ Polity (918–1392)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Hotel & Towers, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-11-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p949885_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: When King Kyŏngsun (897?–978), the last ruler of Silla, surrendered to the Koryŏ state in 935, he made a formative contribution to a new kind of community on the Korean peninsula. Kyŏngsun dissolved his ancient lineage into that of Koryŏ ruler Wang Kŏn (877–943), a maritime merchant’s clan transformed into a lineage distinguished from any other, even ontologically. Rather than simply succeeding earlier dynasties, Koryŏ forged a fundamentally new state and society, using whatever segments that could be salvaged from the past, but set in new patterns. Explicit legacies from previous dynasties (such as descendants, previous rulers, and royal tombs) occupied important positions in what came to constitute a flexible mythomoteur or legitimizing political myth. While the past was rearranged to suit the present, the Koryŏ ruler achieved an unprecedented elevation to Son of Heaven-status, making him the equal of the Chinese Son of Heaven. The Koryŏ polity identified its present in terms of the past: referring to three historical peninsular communities, Koryŏ called itself the “Three Han” (Samhan). The diverse, contradictory legacies of past dynasties were held together by the new notion of an ontologically transcendent ruler. If the monarch held everything together, he was simultaneously constituted by these same elements. The topic of this paper is the complex interaction between segments of the peninsular past that came to frame the present under a new kind of dynastic ruler.

2015 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 225 words || 
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4. Woolley, Nathan. "The Burden of Dynastic Demise: Preserving the Past in Beimeng suoyan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Hotel & Towers, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-11-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p951900_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Beimeng suoyan is a work thick with the culture and concerns of the elite in tenth-century China. Sun Guangxian (d. 968) claimed to have written it to preserve historical details in a period when records were “lost and dispersed” and was careful to note his own efforts to confirm their veracity. Sun cast a cool eye over a range of events, first at the Tang court and later in his home of Former Shu, as well as elsewhere in China. As perhaps part of the first draft of history—for it would be used by later writers—his views of men’s actions and choices are not encumbered by the demands of grand narrative in greater works of history; the genre here allow a piecemeal approach, particularly suitable for mapping the uncertain contours of a confusing time. In political affairs, Sun recognized that the rapidly changing situation presented unique opportunities and challenges, and in various forms of scholarship, Sun interpreted the significance of Tang models in the new climate. The unnamed point of juxtaposition throughout the pages of Beimeng suoyan is the achievements of the height of Tang power and prestige. The uncertainty attendant on the collapse of dynastic order decades earlier resonates throughout. The work as a whole serves as a reflection on the meaning of Tang accomplishments after the dynasty’s demise and in an unstable world.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 154 words || 
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5. Green, Daniel. "A "Raison" for Analysis: Contending Logics of Appropriateness in European Dynastic Society, 1414 and 1518" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-11-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p250552_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper will discuss contending logics of appropriate political behavior operating in Renaissance Europe. Specifically, it will look at the supposed operating logic of Christendom ("raison de dieu" as I term it) and the powerful contending logic of dynastic familism ("raison de famille" in my terms). These logics operated at different strengths illustrated by an analysis of two ideal cases: 1) the politics of the Council of Constance in 1414-1418, and 2) the politics of the Treaty of London and England's effort to bring peace to all of Europe in 1518-1520. The exercise will show how powerful dynastic logics were, how weak the logic of Christian brotherhood was, and offer a new account of IR in early modern Europe. Further, the notion of logics of appropriateness or behavioral logics will be used to discuss the merging of constructivist methods with the English School approach to IR, something often called for but less often implemented.

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