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Showing 1 through 5 of 12 records.
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2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 33 pages || Words: 7631 words || 
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1. Rodgers, Shelly., Lim, Jeongsub. and Bae, Jiyang. "Testing the “Line” between News and Advertising: The Effects of Sponsor Association on the Content and Credibility of Four E-Newspapers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p12917_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The purpose of this research was to test the effect of sponsorship association on memory for news content and the credibility and behavioral intent for four e-newspapers. A secondary aim was to examine whether students versus non-student adults responded differently to the Internet sponsorships. The authors conceptualized the line between news and advertising in terms of how closely the sponsor’s product associated with the news. The method was a 3 (sponsor association) x 2 (section) x 4 (newspapers) x 4 (news story) factorial experiment. The participants were 110 students and 81 non-student adults. The high sponsorship association condition significantly decreased the credibility of the e-newspapers. Students and non-students significantly differed with regard to memory for the content, and credibility and behavioral intent for the e-newspapers.

2008 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 30 pages || Words: 7225 words || 
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2. Heim, Kyle. and Rodgers, Shelly. "Effects of Congruity, Sponsor Type, and News Story Valence on E-newspaper Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 06, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p272685_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study examined the effects of sponsorships on attitudes and behavioral intent toward electronic newspapers. The method was a 2 (sponsor congruity) x 2 (sponsor type) x 2 (news story valence) x 2 (news story topic) within-subjects experiment. Nonprofit sponsors and negative news stories yielded higher ratings of news story credibility, e-newspaper credibility, and attitude toward the e-newspaper than commercial sponsors and positive stories. No significant effects were found for sponsor congruity.

2014 - ASEH Conference – San Francisco Words: 292 words || 
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3. Morse, Kathryn. ": ProQuest Historical Newspapers and the Meanings of the "E-word" across the 1970s" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Conference – San Francisco, Parc 55 Wyndham Hotel, San Francisco, California, <Not Available>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p679071_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Digital databases such as ProQuest Historical Newspapers offer new tools to trace shifting meanings of “environmentalist” and “environmentalism” in the 1970s. This paper will explore such shifts in a range of major metropolitan newspaper from 1965 through 1984, in order to reflect on changing meanings and on the opportunities and pitfalls of digital research.
The only pre-1970 national newspaper mentions of “environmentalism” in the ecological sense occurred in 1966 and 1969, and suggested tensions amongst wide ranging definitions. A May 1966 Washington Post critique of Senator Abe Ribicoff (D-CT) put both e-words in quotation marks while pointing out contradictions in the Senator’s record on pesticides (DDT), automobile safety, air pollution, and nuclear power. On December 29, 1969, New York Times architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable published an editorial, “The Crisis of the Environment,” which connected the human crisis of urban renewal and slum clearance to the environmental crisis of rural land loss and suburban development. She declared (maintaining the quotation marks): “What is needed is a brand of ‘environmentalism’ akin to the current ‘consumerism.’” When did the quotation marks disappear? How did the print media’s use of these terms shift, particularly after the crucial 1970-73? As current scholarship predicts, searches show an explosion between 1970 and 1974 and then a steady climb thereafter. Yet that explosion favored “environmentalist” over “environmentalism.” Searching 9 newspapers across four 5-year periods (1965-69; 69-74; 75-79; 80-84) the term “environmentalist” appeared as follows: 76 records; 5731; 8724; and 9509. For “environmentalism” in those periods: 2 records; 105 records; 210 records; and 270 records. What do they reveal? Who did reporters and editorialists label as “environmentalists”? What did “environmentalism” mean in 1970, 1978, and 1983?

2009 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 31 pages || Words: 9577 words || 
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4. Simpson, Edgar. "Pressing the Press: William E. Chilton III's investigation of fellow newspaper owners between 1980 and 1986" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Sheraton Boston, Boston, MA, Aug 05, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p374696_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: William E. Chilton III was the third generation of his family to serve as publisher/owner of the Charleston Gazette, West Virginia’s largest newspaper. Despite his wealth, Chilton chose to spend his career honing his philosophy of “sustained outrage.” His efforts included two separate investigations into his fellow newspaper owners, which revealed corrupt legal advertising practices, failure to challenge local politicians and businessmen and a widespread focus on profits rather than principles.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. James, Vaughan. and Simpson, Paul. "Vapor and Mirrors: A Qualitative Framing Analysis of E-Cigarette Reporting in High-Circulation U.S. Newspapers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1108066_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have been gaining popularity in the United States since their introduction into the market in 2008. Use among teenagers and young adults has recently skyrocketed, tripling between 2013 and 2014. Given that these products are still unregulated at the federal level, they represent a major public health concern. News media can have substantial effects on public perception of technology and health issues, and so it is important to understand the ways that the U.S. media present e-cigarettes.
This study examined the framing of e-cigarettes in three major high-circulation U.S. newspapers. A qualitative content analysis was performed on 92 e-cigarette-related news articles published between January 2008 and October 2014. Three major frames arose in newspaper reporting: Comparison/Contrast, Regulation, and Uncertainty. Understanding the frames presented in the media can help to both explain e-cigarettes’ rising popularity and highlight potential regulatory issues that will require attention from public health officials.

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