Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 966 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 194 - Next  Jump:
2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 7631 words || 
Info
1. Roberts, Andrew. "Coalition Governance in Eastern Europe: How Portfolio Allocation Differs in Eastern and Western Europe" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p59773_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
Info
2. Ethier, Diane. "Why did Eastern and South-Eastern European Candidates Unevenly Comply with EU Conditionality?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p153371_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2011 - Eighteenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies Words: 247 words || 
Info
3. Rovny, Jan. "The Westernization of Eastern European Political Competition: How Do Non-Economic Issues Restructure Eastern European Party Competition?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighteenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Various University Venues, Barcelona, Spain, Jun 21, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p483519_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Political competition in Eastern Europe has been fundamentally different from the rest of the continent, demonstrating greater fragmentation, lower levels of ideological structuring and -- where structure became discernible -- it differed from that of the democratic West. Eastern European politics have been structured between two poles: 1) left-wing authoritarianism of the communist establishment and 2) the right-wing liberal opposition. Thus while Western European party systems of the early 2000s were defined by liberal left and conservative right, Eastern European systems were the exact opposite with an authoritarian left and liberal right.
Recent empirical evidence, however, suggests that the structure of Eastern European political competition is changing. From 2006 we see a steady reorientation of political competition in Eastern Europe, as most party systems turn to follow the western pattern connecting left-wing economic outlooks with alternative and liberal social politics, while the economic right is becoming increasingly more traditional and authoritative. Although this change is slow and uneven across the various systems, it underscores that Eastern Europe party systems are becoming more like their western counterparts.
This paper argues that this change in Eastern European political competition is caused by the redefinition of the ‘socio-cultural’ dimension of political competition from one centering on issues of civil liberties to one pertaining to cultural identity and state sovereignty. Consequently, in the east like in the west, economic right parties become conservative skeptics of European integration and multiculturalism, while economic left parties become champions of alternative lifestyles and cultural heterogeneity.

2012 - Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies Words: 183 words || 
Info
4. Buzogany, Aron. "Preventing the "Eastern Syndrome". Conditionality and post-accession compliance in Central and Eastern Europe" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Nineteenth Annual Conference of the Council for European Studies, Omni Parker House Hotel, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p549864_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Accounts of the „Mediterranean Syndrome“, describing blatant non-compliance with EU environmental norms became prominent after the accession of Southern European states in the 1980s and 1990s. Explanations for the Syndrome centred on the “misfit” between Southern European and EU environmental policies, weak administrative capacities of state actors and the feeble nature of environmentalism in these countries. Similar concerns about the ability of the Central and Eastern European candidates to apply the acquis after accession were among the important reservations against enlargement. However, the EU has learnt from its experience with the Southern member states. As a result, it institutionalized a highly complex system of accession-management when the ten CEE candidates were knocking on its door. The paper asks whether the EU’s conditionality based approach has led to sustainable compliance – application and enforcement – after accession? Based on both quantitative data and a qualitative analysis of the implementation of six EU environmental directives, this contribution singles out state-society relations, different types of pre-accession conditionality and the existence of domestic and external pressure post-accession to explain success and failure in implementing EU environmental legislation.

2015 - 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 564 words || 
Info
5. Doghi, Dan Pavel. "Students’ socioeconomic background, field of studies, and employability: A case study of ethnic Roma students in Central, Eastern, and South-Eastern Europe" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Washington Hilton Hotel, Washington D.C., Mar 08, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p989628_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Higher education used to be accessible mainly for the socioeconomically privileged. However, in 1960s higher education started to expand, with gross enrollment ratios in Europe attaining 26% in 1970, 35% in 1990 and 67% in 2010 (UNESCO). As a result, higher education became more and more accessible to socioeconomically disadvantaged people, among them being the socioeconomically disadvantaged ethnic Roma in Central, Eastern, and South-Eastern Europe. Referring to the increasing ratios of female and minority students in higher education, as well as of students with working-class background, the academic literature often use the terms “massification” and “de-elitization”. But has higher education given up indeed its elitist elements?

This study seeks to bring evidence in support for the argument that despite the increasing improvements in the access to higher education for the unprivileged groups, the elitist opportunities in tertiary education have been preserved in other ways, one of these ways being the access to specific fields of studies. Since some fields have better employment prospects than others, the more “marketable” fields are more competitive at enrollment, often charge higher tuition fees, and therefore are less accessible for the disadvantaged.

In relation to this argument, this study focuses on the analysis of the socioeconomic background and academic profile of ethnic Roma students in Central, Eastern, and South-Eastern Europe. The available data reveal that ethnic Roma students enroll more frequently in humanities and social sciences and less frequently in science, technology, engineering or mathematics, as compared to the mainstream students; there is also empirical evidence suggesting that Roma students in the region generally come from less privileged socioeconomic background than the mainstream students. Consequently, the study explores the question whether Roma students in the region enroll in specializations providing less secure employment prospects, as well as the degree in which this choice is linked to their socioeconomic status.

The methodology of the study is based on statistical analysis, using data from EUROSTAT on the employability prospects of various specializations in each analyzed country, from EUROSTUDENT on mainstream students’ academic profile and socioeconomic background, and from Roma Education Fund (REF) on Roma students’ academic profile and socioeconomic background. REF collected such data on Roma students from 16 countries of Central, Eastern, and South-Eastern Europe for the last 3 academic years, on a sample of about 2000 Roma students from the region for each year. This data collection is conducted every year as part of REF’s scholarship program and at the moment constitutes the most comprehensive data collection on tertiary-level Roma students in Europe.

The relevance of this study for the field of comparative education is related to the debates about the best ways to improve the access to tertiary education for underprivileged groups, specifically for Roma. Until now there have been several attempts to implement programs based on affirmative action principles in various countries of Central, Eastern, and South-Eastern Europe aimed at facilitating the access to tertiary education for Roma, but with very few efforts in adjusting these policies in a way to avoid the overrepresentation of Roma in specific fields. The evidence that this overrepresentation is associated with Roma’s underprivileged socioeconomic status on the one hand, and with relatively less prospects for decent employment upon graduation associated with the fields in which they are overrepresented on the other hand, may be used for further policy adjustments aiming at creating a more diversified palette of occupations among Roma graduates.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 194 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy