Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 487 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 98 - Next  Jump:
2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
1. Wang, Tianjiao., Liu, Jiawei. and Bailey, Rachel. "Social Eating Cues in Obesity Prevention Fear Appeals Create Positive Affect but Inhibit Healthy Eating Intentions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1361617_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examined individuals’ reported emotional experiences and efficacy ratings after exposure to obesity prevention fear appeals that varied in the types of social cues present. Some of the messages contained high social eating imagery including multiple people eating and others contained lower social eating imagery including one individual eating. Results suggested that fear appeals that present obesity and its consequences with more social eating cues create not only more positive emotional responses but also more response- and self-efficacy. However, these social eating cues create less intention to eat in healthy ways. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 21 pages || Words: 8497 words || 
Info
2. Koski, Jessica. ""I'm a walking eating disorder": Framing and Collective Identity in Eating Disorder Support Groups." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p241011_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Considered in conjunction with psychological research highlighting the contribution of gender roles in the etiology of eating disorders, recent sociological findings pointing to the mobilization potential of self-help suggest that eating disorder support groups may be effective because they encourage feminist identity development. Participant observation in four different groups over the course of 10 months reveals that eating disorder support groups do possess feminist potential. Participants not only learn to trust in their experience but also to be more assertive in personal relationships and to affirm the value of emotion, particularly anger. However, participants do not identify as women but rather on the narrower basis of a shared disorder. As a result, the eating disorder, not gender, legitimates participants’ feminist achievements. Participants subsequently undergo an identity transformation in which eating disordered becomes participants’ primary identity. Continued identification as eating disordered is necessary for participants’ to enjoy its legitimating power. Two processes enable this transformation: frame extension and disease extension. Such findings carry both practical and theoretical implications. First, the study offers insight into how clinicians might improve support groups. Second, the study suggests a need to reframe the debate centered on self-help’s mobilization potential and to further investigate the role of self-labeling in mental illness. Continued exploration of self-labeling, as well as frame and disease extension, is necessary to fully appreciate the impact of employing illness narratives strategically as a means of achieving desired social ends.

2011 - North American Association For Environmental Education Words: 38 words || 
Info
3. Frankenstein, Ellen. "EATING ALASKA: A WRY SEARCH FOR THE RIGHT THINGS TO EAT" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North American Association For Environmental Education, Convention Center, Raleigh, NC, Oct 12, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p504892_index.html>
Publication Type: Film Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A vegetarian moves to Alaska. Searching for a sustainable local meal, she encounters women hunters, teens gathering traditional foods, vegan cooking classes, and toxins in wild foods. Guide online at www.eatingalaska.com See this film with a hands-on activity.

2013 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 481 words || 
Info
4. Swindall, Lindsey. "“You’ll Eat What I Tell You to Eat”: Food Reform and Reaction in the Obama Age" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Washington, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p655889_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: From creating a White House microbrew to enjoying a burger with the Russian President at Ray’s Hell Burger, there can be little argument that food culture has been a prevalent theme in the Obama administration. Yet, from the time of President Obama’s first campaign, criticism of him has often been expressed through the use of negative food stereotypes. When Obama took the oath of office, his image was inaugurated into an online world of racist tropes many of which react against the election of an African American to the highest office in the land by placing him in the company of foods like fried chicken and watermelon that have traditionally mocked the poverty and taste predilections of black Americans.

This paper will first offer an overview of food-related policies in the Obama White House and will pay special attention to Michelle Obama’s effort toward food reform and fighting obesity. For example, Michelle Obama has called for healthier school lunches, started a much-publicized garden at the White House, offered health-conscious tips for supermarket shopping, hosted events for children that feature nutritious recipes, and urged children and adults alike to get moving toward a healthier, more active lifestyle. Her advocacy has gone a long way toward raising national consciousness about eating nourishing foods and securing access to fresh food in poor neighborhoods. Thousands of people across the country embraced her call for healthier family cooking and enjoyed getting a peek into the kitchen and onto the dinner table of the White House in her book American Grown.

However, there has also been vocal criticism of the Obamas’ food reform efforts. Many of these critiques are policy-based and much of the push-back is from a conservative-based,
small government perspective. The government, in this view, has grown too wieldy and powerful under Obama who now wants to even relegate what a family can eat for dinner. This group of critics believes, for example, that Barack Obama has initiated a huge upsurge in the granting of food stamps. Michelle Obama’s food activism, especially, has also led to a strand of racially charged criticism. This seems to fall into a couple of primary patterns. Doctored images and photo captions online mock the First Lady as a stereotypical angry black woman who chides the American public into eating vegetables. “You’ll eat what I tell you to eat,” yells an irate Michelle from the produce aisle in one image. A second genre of reproach specifically mocks her physical stature and body type as an African American woman. An altered image of Michelle as a “hippocrite” depicts her as eating junk food while imploring Americans to “eat as I say, not as I do.” The race-based reaction to food reform plays on existing food stereotypes of African Americans and seems to indicate that public reaction to food reform initiatives in the Obama White House has been far from color blind.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
5. Liu, Jiawei. "We Eat With Our Eyes First: How External Eating, Image Brightness, and Food Cue Matter in Food Picture Processing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1235525_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Given the high prevalence rate of overweight and obesity among the US population and its consequences, it’s important to understand how the impacts of different visual factors (food cues, brightness) in affective food picture processing. This study tested the interaction effects of different types of visual food cues and image brightness across time of exposure on motivational intensity (skin conductance level) and valenced preference (corrugator supercilii activity). Results indicated that individuals exhibited lesser valenced preference when exposed to the food pictures that were darker and with indirect food cue. Compared to moderate external eaters, individuals high in external eating tendency showed a hypersensitivity of appetitive motivational systems to food cues (except when food pictures were dark and used indirect food cues). Implications and future research are discussed.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 98 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy