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2014 - SASE Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 13148 words || 
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1. Angeles, Renira Corinne. "Political Economy of Corporate Governance and Top Executive Compensation; a Comparative Study of Advanced Capitalist Economies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA, Jul 10, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p731037_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Countries differ drastically in how much top executives earn. Established theories in industrial relations predict that incomes tend to be more equal when there is strong mobilization of labour and centralization of wage bargaining. However, the literature does not really capture effects of these non-market institutions on actual pay outcome. The study will use a multilevel regression analysis to investigate the connection of non-market institutions and top executive pay at firm level across 17 OECD countries during 1997-2011. The literature of the politics of corporate governance puts different emphasis on the most powerful groups which control the corporation. The regression results suggest that centralized wage bargaining, trade union density and left government partisanship have a rather diverse effect on top executive pay. Centralized wage bargaining has the strongest restricting effect on salaries and bonuses. Left partisanship have less than 1 per cent negative effect on the cash components, while trade unions have a weak positive effect on salaries and bonuses. The main findings are only significant for the cash components of total executive pay. This suggests that only wage bargaining have successfully restricted top executive pay, and also that equity pay levels are rather weakly connected to industrial relations.

2014 - SASE Annual Conference Words: 456 words || 
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2. Hammer, Anita. and Hammer, Nikolaus. "The Informal Economy in Emerging Economies’ Labour Market Dynamics: A Comparison of India and Russia" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL USA, Jul 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p728778_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Keywords: Informal economy, comparative capitalism, India, Russia, labour markets

Abstract
The continuing integration of emerging economies into the global economy raises questions about the relation between different growth models and the way they translate into labour market outcomes. Interestingly, economic growth has in many instances led to a rise in informal employment, that is a wide variety of jobs that are characterised by low job security, low incomes, limited access to social security and training. In addition the informal economy is characterised by strong segmentation, for example with regard to gender. The International Labour Organisation has recently put informal employment at around 50%-66% of non-agricultural sector employment for most regions in the world (ILO 2012, 15).

The informal economy, however, is a heterogeneous construct and displays considerable variations that invite broad comparative analyses. For example, whereas in the 1980/90s informal employment tended to grow in periods of economic restructuring, that is periods of crisis (e.g. in Latin America, East Asia, or the former socialist economies; see Chen 2005), more recent trends show a coincidence of growing informality with robust economic expansion. Furthermore, within the informal economy, it seems that self-employment is higher than wage employment in developing countries, while this is reverse in the former socialist economies.

Aiming to investigate the institutional foundations of the informal economy as well as its internal diversity in greater detail, this paper explores the composition and development of informality in India and Russia. It draws on two sets of debates. On the one hand, while recent debates on informality have moved beyond earlier dualist conceptions towards a multifaceted picture of multi-sector labour market segmentation (e.g. Chen 2005), they largely remain focussed on the labour market or state capacity for enforcement. On the other hand, research in the comparative capitalist tradition explains the variety of social relations behind the informal economy using a full account of the institutional set-up of emerging or developing economies (e.g. Dibben and Williams 2012; Schneider Ross 2010). The paper argues that debates of informality need to go beyond their implicit labour market institutionalism to a more encompassing framework of comparative capitalism, while the latter can learn from the variety of production relations within the informal economy as well as the multifaceted links they entertain with the formal economy.

In this paper, key arguments on informal employment are discussed with regard to two emerging economies (India and Russia) and the comparative capitalisms framework. Both economies integrated into the global economy at the beginning of the 1990s, although in fundamentally different ways. The account of the two cases looks at the development of informality through different phases of their economic trajectories. The implications from the contrasting developments underscore the importance of a relational and institutional grounding of the informal economy.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 409 words || 
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3. Ellison, David. "On the Political Economy of Subnational Regionalism: The Role of the New Economy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p252925_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Nowhere is the gap between winners and losers in the Central and East European (CEE) transition more evident than in its subnational, cross-regional variation. Both globalization and economic integration in the European marketplace have strongly impacted the geographic and regional distribution of the benefits and costs of integrating markets. Declining activity rates and purchasing power in the less advanced CEE regions and rapidly increasing economic disparities across more and less advanced CEE regions place significant burdens on the future outlook of these less developed regions. Empirical evidence suggests that in CEE the real losers of European integration are low and unskilled workers with little education in declining regions. Variation in regional rates of economic growth and development is of course not news in the wider European Union. Despite evidence of increasing economic convergence across states, increasing regional disparities are a global phenomenon (Sala-I-Martin, 2002) and are likewise well recognized in the European context (Quah, 1996). The appearance of regional disparities in CEE however represents one of the greatest challenges both to the political and economic stability of CEE and to the Union as a whole. This is above all the case because the less developed regions of CEE have experienced some of the worst features of the economic transition.FDI has flowed far more strongly to CEE’s more developed regions, indirectly contributing to rising economic disparities across the more and less advanced regions. And economic decline in the CEE’s less advanced regions has thus far not been stemmed by attempts at creating regional support mechanisms. Central governments themselves are torn between investing in the less developed regions and cementing economic development at the national level (Ellison, 2007). Thus the question remains how best to promote the economic development of the less developed regions.What strategies should be employed to attract investment to and build employment in these regions remains controversial. This paper asks what can be done? Will EU structural and cohesion funds or the Lisbon Agenda help reverse these trends? Can more FDI be directed to the less developed regions of Central and Eastern Europe through other public policy tools? This paper will provide an empirical analysis of the factors influencing subnational regional economic development. Using data on the subnational regional distribution of FDI flows, this paper will ask what factors best explain the regional distribution of FDI flows and will further explore the impact of this and other variables—in particular New Economy models—on the prospects for regional economic development.

2009 - SASE Annual Conference Pages: 1 pages || Words: 293 words || 
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4. Lee, Sophia Seungyoon. "The Risk Shift in Post-industrial Economies: A Comparative Study on Social Risks in 18 Post-industiral Economies including Asian States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Sciences Po, Paris, France, Jul 16, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p371173_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The discussion of “new risks” in social policy arena started to gain attention from the late 1990s. It is commonly argued that new risks are provoked by deindustrialization and/or globalization and a convergence theory on new risk is suggested that it is characterized to be more concentrated on the young, women and low skilled.
This study commences its inquiry with a scientific conceptualization of social risk with an ambitious attempt to critically rethink the argument of new risk or new crisis. A reification of the concept is followed by an empirical investigation on the question of whether there is a new risk and is there a convergence in the characteristics of new risk as the literature suggests. A lack of comparative empirical evidence of new risks in the existing literature calls for an investigation of advanced economies both from East and the West. 18 countries are selected in order to ground a comparative perspective in understanding the new risk and they are comparatively analyzed using the Fuzzy-set Qualitative Analysis method (fs/QCA) to measure the changes in degree. In sum, this chapter aims to answer two questions: 1) What is new risk? and 2) How do the characteristic of risks differ in different post-industrial countries? This study will contribute to the new risk discussion not only theoretically and empirically but also methodologically.

2013 - SASE Annual Conference Words: 99 words || 
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5. Llofriu, Miguel. "Keys for the Development of an Economy Based on Values: The Digital Economy Companies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, Jun 27, 2013 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p653427_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: En esta comunicación se expondran los principales avances del paradigma axioeconómico y sus inmediatas aplicaciones prácticas.
El paradigma axioeconómico,parte de una nueva concepción a la hora de entender y, sobre todo, generar cambio a través de los valores. Desde este paradigma se ofrecen las claves para poder equilibrar la sostenibilidad ética (largo plazo) con el beneficio económico (corto plazo).

Esto supone que nos hallamos anta la posibilidad de contribuir a la mejora de la cultura empresarial. De ahí la urgencia de enarbolar los principios de este paradigma y, especialmente, las aplicaciones prácticas que puede generar para desarrollar un mundo mejor.

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