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2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 6883 words || 
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1. Beller, Emily. "Re-Conceptualizing “Parent” Education in Predicting Children’s Educational Attainment: How Attention to the Non-Residential Parent’s Education is Key to Understanding the Lower Educational Outcomes of Children Raised in Single Parent Families" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p105261_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Quantitative models predicting children's educational attainment typically assume that both the intercepts (means) and slopes (strength of effects) of non-residential parent's education are eqivalent to those of residential parent education. I use data on non-residential parent educational attainment , coupled with measures of parent involvement, to explain the lower educational outcomes of children raised primarily in single parent families. I show that the lowered attainment is not an effect of family type per se, but rather due to children's reduced access to non-residential parent educational resources.

2017 - Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting Words: 488 words || 
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2. Morgan, Lucinda. and Fresse, Fabrice. "Professional development for educators by educators cultivating educational diplomacy across the Atlantic: the development of the Transatlantic Educators Dialogue" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting, Sheraton Atlanta Downtown, Atlanta, Georgia, Mar 05, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1217687_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the context of national and international institutions questioning the roles, missions and performances of various educational systems, the Transatlantic Educators Dialogue (TED), supported by the European Union Center at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, creates an opportunity for educational experts from the countries of the European Union and the United States to identify educational challenges, compare good practices, and develop professional expertise. The paper explains the conception of TED, based on concepts of globalization and education described by the works of Fazal Rizvi. TED was conceived as an educational diplomatic think-tank, which unites educators from different professional backgrounds and utilizes different structural and geographical spaces in the educational world. In addition, online technology, including Blackboard Collaborate, Moodle, Facebook Groups, and Google Docs, are used to facilitate a collaborative and comparative analysis of educational systems through a meta-conceptual and transversal approach.

The paper also details the manner in which TED was designed and implemented as a thirteen week professional development opportunity, explores and analyzes the history of TED, and how it has transitioned into a program that connects approximately one hundred each year. In order to better explain the impact of TED on educators who have participated, qualitative methods have been utilized, and this paper includes data collected from the applicants of participants, as well as analysis of the end-of-program evaluations and follow-up interviews with former participants. There is a specific topic of focus for each weekly TED session that is co-led by three to four participants. Topics in previous TED sessions have included youth culture, comparing the various education structures in the United States and Europe, approaches to teaching, impressions of “the other’ and cultural awareness, immigration and its impact in the classroom, student and parent involvement, building safe spaces in the classroom, religious education and homeschooling, technology use in the classroom, opportunities for international collaboration, and the future of education.

The paper argues that TED has been highly successful of connecting educators who normally would not interact, and allows them opportunities to present about the educational situations in their local community while simultaneously learning about the educational cultures in other locations in the United States and in Europe. After seven years since implementation and with guided adjustments, this paper also explores additional outcomes of TED, as well as the future of this innovative, diplomatic program that serves as a form of professional development for educators. Though the expense and time needed to travel across the Atlantic Ocean, or even across state or national borders, might be inconceivable for many educators in their current situations, through the use of online technology, TED effectively connects educators, classrooms, and schools in an engaging and empowering platform. It encourages educators to consider how they perceive themselves as a leader in their own educational context, as well as an opportunity to better understand the challenges and similarities they have with fellow educators in various locations.

2012 - LRA 62nd Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 1800 words || 
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3. Wickens, Corrine., Jung, Jin. and Parker, Jenny. "Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) Candidates’ Perceptions of Integrating Content Area Literacy into Physical Education" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 62nd Annual Conference, Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, San Diego, CA, Nov 28, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p578299_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 735 words || 
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4. Yonehara, Aki. "Transition of “international education” in formal school curriculum of Japan: From “Education for International Understanding” to “Education for Sustainable Development”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 10, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p633157_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Amartya Sen, a Nobel Prize laureate in economics, states in his recent volume that “[t]here are few non-neighbors left in the world today” (2009, p.173). Sen explains that we are inevitably linked by mutual economic, social and political relationships as well as by shared concerns such as injustice, inhumanity, and various forms of violence. From this perspective, we have to recognize the fact that we are neighbors, not simply in an optimistically idealistic sense, but in an urgently realistic sense. If this is considered as one of the decent views of the world today, how can we nurture the next generation to become “global neighbors” in this global age?

In order to answer this question, this paper pays attention to the possibility of “international education” in compulsory school education. UNESCO launched “Education for International Understanding (EIU)” as soon as it was established in 1946. Through EIU, including peace education, human rights education, and the like, UNESCO tried to implement the idea articulated in its famous preamble to the Constitution. This original idea of EIU has been transformed into “International Education” in 1974, and recently, “Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)” has been more widely recognized. What kind of impact have these educational trials brought to the formal school curriculum in compulsory education? Have these trials helped and promoted to nurture the minds of “global neighbors”?

This paper aims at considering these questions by focusing on a case of Japan because it has unique background as one of the industrialized, non-Western societies and because it is a nation which proposed the United Nations’ Campaign for Decade of ESD. Document analysis is employed to reveal the impact of a series of “international education.” The Course of Study and the Reports from Deliberative Councils are utilized as primary data to analyze how compulsory school education in Japan has accepted and digested “international education,” starting from EIU to ESD.

It was in 1989 that the term “EIU” appeared on the Course of Study for the first time, under the influence from the Report from Provisional Council on Education. In this Course of Study, it was emphasized to “deepen international understanding and foster the attitude to respect our own culture and tradition.” Following this movement, in 1996, the 15th session of Central Council for Education published the Report entitled “The Model for Japanese Education from the Perspective of the 21st Century,” which stressed the importance of EIU and the improvement of foreign language education. Affected by this Report, the revised version of Course of Study in 1998 clearly introduced EIU as a possible educational activity. This Course of Study promoted EIU, but in reality, major educational activities under the name of EIU were biased toward English education.

This atmosphere of EIU as English education began to change since 2002, when Japanese government proposed Decade of ESD at World Summit on Sustainable Development. This proposal was accepted at United Nations General Assembly in December 2002 and Decade of ESD started from January 2005. Affected by these international trends, in 2008, Central Council for Education published the Report entitled “How to Improve the Couse of Study for Preschool, Primary School, Junior High School, High School, and Special-needs School,” in which the term “sustainable society” appears many times. The revised version of the Course of Study published in the same year, which contains the issues of ESD. These formal documents justify ESD implementation at public schools. Asia-Pacific Cultural Center for UNESCO and other related organizations published various guide books for ESD implementation, and supported by them, ESD activities have been gradually expanded over compulsory education in Japan.

Remarkable feature of this new movement can be seen in “locality of ESD.” While EIU tends to focus on English education and learning foreign cultures, ESD emphasizes on students’ dairy life; such as disaster education in Kobe and Miyagi, which experienced great earthquakes, and cultural heritage education in Nara, an ancient capital city.

This paper found that English education was exclusively focused under EIU in the nineties; while a more comprehensive approach has been taken under ESD today. This paper describes how the meaning of “international education” has been changing in Japanese school education and clarifies what kind of struggle a non-English speaking country has faced with when “international education” was introduced. This historical case study will contribute to reconsidering the idea and its implementation of “international education” in order to improve it into “education for global neighbors,” especially as a post-ESD direction.

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