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2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 38 pages || Words: 9598 words || 
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1. Claassen, Ryan. "Information Effects and Campaign Effects: Maximum Effects for Minimum Citizens?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p280014_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2013 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: 8299 words || 
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2. Kinnally, Will. and Van Vonderen, Kristen. "Media Effects and Body Image: Clarifying the Cultivation Effect on Body Dissatisfaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Las Vegas Hotel (LVH), Las Vegas, NV, Apr 07, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p632009_index.html>
Publication Type: Open Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Media effects on body image is a well-studied issue. However, aspects of the research – such as those regarding cultivation theory and its effects on body dissatisfaction – are unclear or incomplete. This study attempts to clarify the relationship between cultivation and body dissatisfaction. A sample of 417 female undergraduate students completed media exposure, perceptions of social attitudes toward thinness, peer and parental attitudes toward thinness, as well as internalization of the thin-ideal and body dissatisfaction measures. Overall, the study found that exposure to thin-ideal media as well as perceptions of peer and parent attitudes regarding weight and body shape are associated with perceptions of the value society places on thinness and internalization of the thin ideal. These findings suggest that, through cultivation, media combine with other social sources such as perceptions of peer and parent attitudes to directly correlate with the perception of social reality regarding the value of thinness and personal attitudes toward thinness (i.e. internalization of the thin ideal). However, media exposure and peer attitudes were indirectly related to body dissatisfaction. Instead, internalization of the thin ideal and perception of parent attitudes proved to be the strongest indicators of body dissatisfaction. The process of cultivation through resonance is modeled and the implications of the theory are discussed.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 7307 words || 
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3. Chung, Adrienne., Rimal, Rajiv., Borzekowski, Dina. and Gielen, Andrea. "Message Attributes and Parental Mediation Effects on Children: How Parental Communication Modifies Message Framing Effects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p983338_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, we ask whether videos with safety messages targeting young children be positively or negatively framed, and when parents talk to children about media content, does it matter whether they are provided guidance on how to do so? We conducted a 2 (message frame: positive or negative) x 3 (parental mediation: no mediation, unguided mediation, or guided mediation), randomized between-subjects experiment with parent-child pairs (N = 322; age of children: between 6 and 9 years old). Results indicated that unprompted recall was greater in the unguided mediation condition. For the other outcomes (understanding, self-efficacy, and behavioral intentions), positive frames were superior to negative frames. Guided mediation, on the whole, was superior to no mediation or unguided mediation. Overall, results support the effectiveness of positive framing and parents participating in a teachable moment with their kids in order to enhance the positive effects of media messages.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 495 words || 
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4. Marbell, Kristine. and Grolnick, Wendy. "Effects of parental autonomy support in two cultures: Moderating effect of children’s self-construals" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p957272_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: There is controversy over whether parental autonomy support is related to positive outcomes for adolescents in collectivist and hierarchical societies, where values of deference to authority and placing the community’s needs above one’s own are encouraged. For example, Chirkov et al. (2003) and Wang, Pomerantz, and Chen (2007) found positive effects of parental autonomy support in Russia and China, respectively. However, Ivengar and Lepper (1999) showed that a key component of autonomy support, choice, functioned differently in Asian American than European American children, whereby parents’ making decisions for their children had positive effects.

From a Self-Determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985) perspective, autonomy is a universal need and thus support of autonomy would be crucial across cultures. Yet, importantly, the same behaviors displayed by parents might have different meanings and so different effects. In particular, decision-making by parents may be perceived differently depending on whether children do (interdependent) or do not (independent) perceive their parents as part of their self-construals.

To address these issues, the relations between specific autonomy supportive behaviors (perspective-taking, open exchange, decision-making, and choice) and adolescent outcomes were examined in Ghana, a country described as collectivist and hierarchical, and the US which is described as individualist and egalitarian. In addition, we examined whether adolescents’ self-construals (Markus & Kitayama, 1991) moderated relations between specific types of autonomy support and outcomes.

A mixed-methods design was used. Participants in the quantitative portion (401 seventh and eighth graders from Ghana (N = 156) and the US (N = 245)), completed questionnaires on parenting and their school motivation and adjustment. Participants in the qualitative portion were eight Ghanaian parents whose adolescents reported them as highly autonomy supportive. These parents were interviewed about times when they attempted to support children’s autonomy.

Factor analyses indicated two autonomy support factors in both cultures: perspective-taking/open exchange and allowance of decision-making/choice with factorial invariance established using AMOS (Test for differences: (χ2 (12, N = 401) = 17.32. p =.14). The Perspective-taking factor was negatively correlated with controllingness in both countries while the decision-making factor was negatively correlated with controllingness only in the US, indicating that it did not represent autonomy support in Ghana. In both countries perspective-taking positively predicted intrinsic motivation, academic engagement and perceptions of competence (see Table 1). However, only in the US was decision-making positively associated with these outcomes.

Regression results also suggested that adolescents’ self-construals moderated the relations between autonomy support and outcomes, such that the more independent adolescents’ self- construals, the more positive were results for decision-making. For example, regression for adolescents with more independent self-construals, decision-making was positively related with engagement, while for adolescents with interdependent self-construals it was negatively related (see Figure 1). Qualitative findings showed that Ghanaian parents used autonomy support strategies, especially open exchange, but stressed in using them the importance of children’s respect. The results suggest the positive effects of autonomy support across cultures but stress that the way parents support autonomy may differ by culture.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 22 pages || Words: 7031 words || 
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5. Potter, David. "The Illusion of a CNN-Effect? Using Japanese Foreign Disaster Assistance to Examine the Effect of Stochastic Policy Environments" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p250899_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Policy uncertainty is often cited as a cause of the CNN-effect, with some arguing that an uncertain policy environment is a necessary condition for media-driven foreign policy. While the logic appears compelling, with the rise of the debate over a CNN-effect following so closely on the heels of the end of the realist foreign policy environment of the Cold War, the claim is contradicted by rigorous empirical analyses of the influence of the news media on sets of foreign policy actions. Far from the media influence becoming predominant in a period of policy uncertainty, the longstanding correlation between media coverage and the global aid response to disasters disappeared with the end of the cold war. This study provides a detailed analysis of how periods of policy uncertainty affects the influence of media coverage and other factors related to the provision of Japanese disaster assistance.

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