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Showing 1 through 5 of 22,083 records.
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2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 38 pages || Words: 9598 words || 
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1. Claassen, Ryan. "Information Effects and Campaign Effects: Maximum Effects for Minimum Citizens?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p280014_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 9861 words || 
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2. King, Andy. "Visual Exemplification and Skin Cancer: The Effects of Message Presentation and Perceptions on Message Effectiveness" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714556_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The present study tested exemplification theory by varying the type of visual exemplar presented in the context of skin cancer prevention messages. Using a common education tactic in skin cancer education, which has also been used in public health communication efforts, an experiment was conducted to determine the influence of varying the visual exemplar presentation: singular exemplar, juxtaposition, or multiple comparisons. Compared to a control condition, the visual exemplification proved to be more effective at increasing affective response as well as behavioral intentions to perform skin self-examination. Further, participant perception of congruency between the images and text interacted to explain part of the differences in behavioral intention change. A surprise response was found to mediate the relationship between visual exemplification and behavioral intention change, although investigation of potential moderated mediation found no such relationship. Visual exemplification presentation also influenced decision making criterion.

2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 16 pages || Words: 8699 words || 
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3. Biddle, Stephen. and Long, Stephen. "Democratic Effectiveness? Reassessing the Claim that Democracies are More Effective in Battle" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p65597_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The democratic peace thesis has attracted an enormous literature. Recently, it has been joined by an argument that democracies are distinctive not only in their choices between war and peace, but also in their effectiveness as combatants once committed to war. Empirical researchers including David Lake, D. Scott Bennett, Dani Reiter, Allan Stam and others have argued that democracies are substantially more successful in wars and battles than non-democracies, and they have pointed to unique properties of democratic decision making, leadership styles, or popular commitment to state policy as reasons.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 6619 words || 
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4. Nabi, Robin., Finnerty, Keli., Domsche, Tricia. and Hull, Shawnika. "Exploring the Therapeutic Effects of TV Viewing: The Effect of Regret on Selective Exposure to and Impact of Experience-Relevant Programming" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p14574_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Extant theorizing and research suggests that media are used to meet social and psychological needs, emotional ones in particular, yet despite the research on media-induced fear and need for coping, the literature says very little about the use of television programming for coping with personal problems. Regret, in particular, has been wholly overlooked in the realm of media study. This research explores how regretted past experiences impact interest in experience-relevant television programming as well as the effect of such programming on felt regret and enjoyment. 144 participants, half of whom had been unfaithful in a romantic relationship, were asked to rate a series of storylines for interest in viewing. They were then exposed to one of two versions of a TV program segment edited to have different endings – regret for cheating or rationalization. Consistent with hypotheses, those who had both cheated and felt regret about their behavior were more likely than others to show interest in viewing cheating-related programming. Further, they appeared to enjoy the cheating storyline more than others, particularly the version with the dissonance-reducing ending. Overall, regret appeared to have been reduced, though this was not contingent on which ending had been viewed. We conclude that television can be a sought after and effective source for coping with regret.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 44 pages || Words: 12589 words || 
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5. Lee, Byoungkwan., Salmon, Charles. and Witte, Kim. "The Effectiveness of Entertainment-Education as Media Health Campaigns: The Effects of Entertainment Narrative and Identification on HIV/AIDS Preventive Behavior" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p13943_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the persuasive effects of narrative content in the entertainment program of popular media in order to explain why Entertainment-education (E-E) messages have the effects. In order to examine the roles of narrative engagement and identification with the characters of an E-E program, this study proposed and tested a recursive structural equation model with specific hypotheses. Survey data drawn from listeners of a radio serial drama for HIV/AIDS prevention in Ethiopia were analyzed for the study.
In a proposed model, this study found that an audience member’s identification with a character played a mediating role in the relationships between narrative engagement and individuals’ beliefs about HIV/AIDS although this mediating role was partially supported. In addition, the direct effects of both affective engagement and cognitive engagement on individuals’ health beliefs were found. Based on the findings, Theoretical and practical implications were discussed.

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