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2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 38 pages || Words: 9598 words || 
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1. Claassen, Ryan. "Information Effects and Campaign Effects: Maximum Effects for Minimum Citizens?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-12-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p280014_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2018 - ICA's 68th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Broekman, Francette., Piotrowski, Jessica., Beentjes, Johannes. and Valkenburg, Patti. "Effects of Haptic Movement and Hotspot Salience on the Usability and Educational Effectiveness of Children’s Educational Apps" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 68th Annual Conference, Hilton Prague, Prague, Czech Republic, May 22, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-12-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1361470_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Given the increasing popularity of literacy apps among young children, it is vital to take a closer look at the design of apps as well as their effects. Current theory suggests that when the design of an app is mismatched with the child’s abilities (e.g., the task is too easy or too difficult), educational content comprehension is likely to suffer as a result of poor usability. This study investigated how tactile and visual features affect children’s vocabulary learning as well as explore how usability plays a role this relationship. An experiment among 128 children aged 4-5 showed that, although children were able to learn words from the app in a relatively short time, the manipulation of both features did not lead to improved vocabulary learning. The findings did reveal that cognitively-easier visual (salient or non-salient hotspots) as well as tactile (tapping and dragging) features affected different attributes of usability.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5092 words || 
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3. Besamusca, Janna. "Effects of Social Position and Institutional Contexts on Motherhood Effects in Self-employment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2018-12-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1376014_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Previous research in Anglo-Saxon countries has shown that women are more likely to be self-employed if they have children and proposed two explanations based on women’s positive or segmented/bimodal selection into self-employment. The positive selection hypotheses views self-employment as an avenue for privileged mothers who are not breadwinners to reconcile career ambitions with intensive mothering ideals. The segmented selection hypothesis, on the contrary, argues that women in high social positions select into professional self-employment regardless of motherhood status to realize career ambitions, while their peers in low social positions are negatively selected into non-professional self-employment through work-family conflict.
In this article, I use the IPUMS international dataset to study the effects of women’s social position and institutional context on probabilities of being self-employed. Using a two-stage multilevel design, I test the positive selection and segmented selection theories in 23 high and middle-income countries and explore the extent to which country level variables with regard to alternative reconciliation strategies, inclusiveness of the social security system, and gender equality in the labor market can explain country variation. Preliminary results indicate that there is evidence supporting the positive selection theory in France, the Dominican Republic, and Romania, whereas the segmented selection theory is supported in Belarus, Botswana, Canada, Ecuador, Ghana, Mexico, India, Panama, Portugal, and Vietnam, while ten out of 23 countries do not conform to either pattern. Country comparisons indicate that more gender equality and part-time work are negatively associated with motherhood effects, but only after reaching a 20% incidence rate. The relation between the inclusion of self-employed workers in social security schemes has opposite effects for motherhood effects for women in high and low social positions: the relation is positive for the low social position group and negative for the high social position group.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 22 pages || Words: 7031 words || 
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4. Potter, David. "The Illusion of a CNN-Effect? Using Japanese Foreign Disaster Assistance to Examine the Effect of Stochastic Policy Environments" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2018-12-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p250899_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Policy uncertainty is often cited as a cause of the CNN-effect, with some arguing that an uncertain policy environment is a necessary condition for media-driven foreign policy. While the logic appears compelling, with the rise of the debate over a CNN-effect following so closely on the heels of the end of the realist foreign policy environment of the Cold War, the claim is contradicted by rigorous empirical analyses of the influence of the news media on sets of foreign policy actions. Far from the media influence becoming predominant in a period of policy uncertainty, the longstanding correlation between media coverage and the global aid response to disasters disappeared with the end of the cold war. This study provides a detailed analysis of how periods of policy uncertainty affects the influence of media coverage and other factors related to the provision of Japanese disaster assistance.

2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 16 pages || Words: 8699 words || 
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5. Biddle, Stephen. and Long, Stephen. "Democratic Effectiveness? Reassessing the Claim that Democracies are More Effective in Battle" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2018-12-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p65597_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The democratic peace thesis has attracted an enormous literature. Recently, it has been joined by an argument that democracies are distinctive not only in their choices between war and peace, but also in their effectiveness as combatants once committed to war. Empirical researchers including David Lake, D. Scott Bennett, Dani Reiter, Allan Stam and others have argued that democracies are substantially more successful in wars and battles than non-democracies, and they have pointed to unique properties of democratic decision making, leadership styles, or popular commitment to state policy as reasons.

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