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2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Words: 230 words || 
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1. Brumbaugh, Susan., Lindquist, Christine. and Casson, Lucinda. "Lessons Learned From the SVORI Data Collection Effort: Implications for Collecting Data among Prisoners and Former Prisoners" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p202270_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The data collection effort for the longitudinal offender interview component of the SVORI impact evaluation has been a massive undertaking. A total of 11,400 cases were fielded to 30 field interviewers , who had conducted a total of 7,120 interviews as of March 2007 in 14 states [16 sites but 14 states] —locating, tracking, and interviewing respondents in over 300 correctional facilities (and numerous communities within the 15 states) as well as in a multitude of communities. The experience gained from this undertaking can be used to better design subsequent studies involving incarcerated (and formerly incarcerated) populations and inform our understanding about the actual circumstances facing these individuals and the systems by which they are affected. This presentation will summarize key “lessons learned” from the SVORI field interviewers and supervisors, based on focus groups held with these individuals after nearly 3 years of field work. The presentation will focus on two interrelated topics: 1) successful strategies for conducting interviews with prisoners and former prisoners (including locating and tracing techniques, successfully interviewing in jails and prisons, data collection barriers and solutions, and preparation for going into the field) and 2) “firsthand” knowledge about the challenges facing returning prisoners and the systems designed to deal with them (including field interviewer perceptions about system shortcomings, success stories witnessed, and the “real world” conditions facing returning prisoners).

2004 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 211 words || 
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2. Jomini, Talia. and Kenski, Kate. "Nonresponse and the 2000 Election Cycle: Topic Salience and Efforts to Increase Response" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs, Phoenix, Arizona, May 11, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p116104_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: It has long been documented that there is a relationship between survey response and topic salience, namely that individuals responding to a survey are likely to find the survey topic more salient than nonrespondents. For election surveys, nonresponse resulting from lack of salience can impact findings because respondents are generally more educated and politically involved; however, as interest in political campaigns increases over the course of an election, this type of nonresponse theoretically should decline. Using data from the 2000 National Annenberg Election Survey (NAES), which was conducted nearly continuously between December 14, 1999 and January 19, 2001, this study investigates the issue of nonresponse in a RDD telephone survey across the 2000 election cycle. The NAES employed a rolling cross sectional design, whereby each day represents a simple random sample cross section of respondents. The NAES made efforts to increase response rates by calling potential respondents back a maximum of eighteen times and using refusal conversions. This study investigates the representativeness of the sample over time by comparing respondents to the Current Population Survey estimates each month over time. Other variables investigated as explaining differences in survey representativeness over time include: temperature, sample size, and number of dials required to reach the respondent.

2007 - American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Words: 245 words || 
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3. Gortney, Justine., Slade, Julian. and Lewis, Grace. "Interdisciplinary Educational Effort Between Pharmacy and Nursing Colleges at a Community Hospital" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Disney’s Yacht & Beach Club Resort, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, Jul 14, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p196103_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Objectives: To enhance professional development and multidisciplinary training at a local community hospital.
Methods: To support a university-wide QEP and profession-wide goals, the colleges of pharmacy and nursing identified clinical practice sites available to pilot interdisciplinary training. Pharmacy students on APPEs and students in Nursing Care of the Adult Client I or II course were assigned to work in multidisciplinary pairs. Students worked together one full day a week for a five week period on a specified patient unit. Activities included physical patient assessment, medication reconciliation and administration, and chart review. Late day, the students and faculty members would meet as a group to discuss patient cases, medication or care issues identified and resolved, and skills learned from the process. Students were asked to complete a five-question survey, both Likert scale and room for individual comments, in order to ascertain their attitudes and perceptions of the process. Survey items included awareness of responsibilities, communication and teamwork, patient care, and professional development.
Results: One rotation of students in fall 2006, N=13 (P4s and adult II nursing course), appeared to have an overall positive experience (overall score=5 being the most positive, and score=25 most negative). Two rotations of students will be participating this semester.
Implications: Training students in an interdisciplinary fashion may be perceived positively by pharmacy and nursing students in this initial effort. A goal for the future is to improve the experience and evaluate its impact on patient care and medication safety at the institutional level.

2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 37 pages || Words: 9140 words || 
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4. Yang, Kaifeng. "Public Administrators' Trust in Citizens: A Missing Link in Citizen Involvement Efforts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p63095_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One important but often unattended issue in citizen participation efforts is whether public officials trust citizens, and, if not, whether they will formulate and implement policies that really engage, empower, and emancipate citizens. This study attempts to answer four questions: Is trust in citizens relevant and important? Is it a valid construct that can be differentiated from other similar constructs? What factors influence its level? And how does trust influence citizen involvement efforts? Based on 320 public administrators’ survey responses, the study finds that public administrators’ trust in citizens is a relevant and valid construct, and is a predictor to proactive citizen involvement efforts. Interestingly, public administrators generally have a neutral (neither trustful, nor distrustful) view of citizens. Finally, factors affecting the level of trust are identified at the individual, organizational, and societal levels.

2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 40 pages || Words: 10302 words || 
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5. Potter, Brian. "A deeper solution for the international commons: building an effort control regime for the Eastern Tropical Pacific tuna fishery." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-10-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p62531_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The parable of the tragedy of the commons tells that resources held under open access conditions are prone to over-exploitation. For fisheries, regulations to limit aggregate catch improve resource use yet in turn promote over-investment or a ‘race for fish.’ An optimal regulatory regime would limit the investments and labor dedicated to harvesting. While within a country limiting investment is more difficult than setting catch limits, achievement of either objective in global forums is quite rare.
Motivated by three reasons, the member-states of the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission have attempted this difficult task, in addition to implementing other conservation measures, for the purse-seine yellowfin fishery. First, increases in fishing capacity by existing participants and newcomers have resulted in financial losses for the major fleets. Without limits in fishing inputs, this process is likely to continue. Second, the resolution of the tuna-dolphin controversy promises to open markets long protected, thereby encouraging additional harvesting capacity in an already-crowded fishery. Finally, bureaucratic changes in some countries have empowered fishery professionals who balance sustainable resource use with economic development. The strength of these influences, as well as and efforts and concessions to create a regime, vary among the states involved.
The process of negotiations and likely success of international regulation of harvesting capacity in the Eastern Tropical Pacific yellowfin fishery provides a successful example of management of global common property.

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