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2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 14234 words || 
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1. Earnheardt, Mary Beth. "Examining Political Motives and Elaboration when Using Television and the Internet: Testing the Multi-channel Political Motivation and Elaboration Model" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p259925_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Multi-channel Political Motivation and Elaboration Model was tested. Results showed those who used television and Internet for political needs were more gratified than those who used only one of these channels. Instrumental media use was related to central route message processing. For television viewers, age, education, affinity, and involvement predicted greater political activity. For Internet users, age, education, social interaction motivation, involvement, and need for cognition predicted greater political activity.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Words: 317 words || 
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2. Eveland, Jr., William. and Trepte, Sabine. "Elaborating on Elaboration: How to Grasp What Newsreaders Think and Learn While Discussing Politics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p715043_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: There is convincing evidence from survey research and anecdotal evidence that political discussion is a sine qua non of individual political development, knowledge gains and participation. Political discussion increasingly is considered the second pillar beside media exposure to explain how people learn from the news. However, we are not fully convinced that sufficient evidence yet exists to close the case. Indeed, many studies have failed to produce the expected results, and due to publication biases many of these go unpublished. In the light of contradicting results, political discussion reveals itself to be a particularly challenging topic to study. Why do we find clear relationships of political discussion measured with self-assessment items, but not if we manipulate discussion or measure it via direct observation? We will address three challenges in studying political discussion to answer these questions.

First, it seems time to further define what underlying processes we are theoretically modeling while studying political discussion. Discussion frequency or intensity should be considered largely as proxies for or prompts of the processes of cognitive elaboration. Examples for more sensitive measures will be suggested.

Second, our understanding of the relationship of political discussion and political knowledge is widely based on the assumption of causality, with discussion fostering knowledge gains. We will present an overview of studies showing that the sequence of causality is still an open question and thus an important domain for further study. Methods and approaches will be suggested of how to approach this question.

Third, discussion is usually treated as a stimulus in experimental approaches to political conversation. However, it seems questionable whether or not political discussion can be treated as a traditional experimental manipulation because it combines many ambiguities, non-independencies, and disrupting factors that would disqualify it as a “clean” independent variable. Two ideas will be discussed to address this challenge: First, making discussion a “clean” stimulus, second, understanding discussion as an intervening, rather than an independent variable.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 9600 words || 
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3. Lee, Eun-Ju. "When Are Strong Arguments Stronger Than Weak Arguments? Deindividuation Effects on Message Elaboration in CMC" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p229883_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The present experiment examined how the lack of individuating information affects message elaboration and conformity to group norms in text-based computer-mediated communication (CMC). Participants made decisions about choice dilemma scenarios and exchanged their arguments with three ostensible partners via computer. Consistent with the social identity model of deindividuation effects (SIDE), those who had exchanged personal profiles with their partners were better able to differentiate between strong and weak arguments and were more likely to make conformity decisions based on the message content than those who had not. On the other hand, those with no identity cues were more likely to factor in group identification for their conformity decisions. Results suggest that less systematic message processing and greater reliance on normative considerations account for how deindividuation moderates the effects of argument strength on group conformity.

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 53 pages || Words: 9347 words || 
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4. Carpenter, Christopher. and Henningsen, David. "The Effects of Passive Verb Constructed Arguments Within the Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p193250_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Different levels of agent prominence in a sentence (active voice, passive voice with the agent present, and passive voice with the agent missing) were examined as possible variables within the Elaboration Likelihood Model of persuasion. Agent prominence did not affect persuasion as a modifier of motivation. The data supports agent prominence acting as a central cue. There was a significant interaction effect of agent prominence and argument strength on the amount of outcome-relevant and value-relevant involvement the messages produced. There was also a main effect for argument strength.

2009 - ISA - ABRI JOINT INTERNATIONAL MEETING Pages: 33 pages || Words: 9633 words || 
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5. Vitale, Denise., Albuquerque, Maria Do Carmo. and Specie, Priscila. "Democracy and Civil Society in the Global Order: The Participation of the Indians, South Africans and Brazilians Non-State Actors in the Elaboration of the Environmental External Policy and in the UN Environmental Conference" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA - ABRI JOINT INTERNATIONAL MEETING, Pontifical Catholic University, Rio de Janeiro Campus (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Jul 22, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p381529_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This research aims to analyse the participation of the Indians, Brazilians and South Africans non-state actors in the deliberations on environmental issues, either in the elaboration of the external policy in each country, or in the United Nations environmental conferences. One of the main challenges opened up by the process of globalization refers to the need of more legitimacy in the democratic decisions in multilateral themes. While the substantive themes of politics are getting globalized, the institutions of the traditional political process remain internally oriented. The analysis of the possibilities and limits of the process of social participation of environmental movements and non-governmental organizations aims to contribute to a theoretical and practical qualification of the theme. In the theoretical plan, the research has the objective to contribute with the conceptual debate of some still blurred terms such as cosmopolitan democracy, international civil society and global public sphere. In the empirical plan, the results of the research aim to enhance the sensitiveness of the actors involved in the theme for the external dimension, and the articulation among them.

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