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2010 - The Law and Society Association Words: 316 words || 
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1. NeJaime, Douglas. "Convincing Elites, Controlling Elites: Contextualizing Elite Support in the Legal Mobilization Framework" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Chicago Hotel, Chicago, IL, May 27, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p407291_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Within the legal mobilization framework, sociolegal scholars point to elite support as a key indirect benefit of litigation. These scholars demonstrate how court-centered strategies help to generate support from both state and non-state elite actors, and this support in turn helps a movement to achieve its social reform goals. When government officials sympathize with a movement’s claims, they are more likely to make policy consistent with those claims. When private elites embrace a movement’s claims, they may influence opinion on those claims and contribute resources to the movement. A close examination of elite support in the gay rights context, however, suggests that a more nuanced approach to elite support is required within the legal mobilization framework. Instead of assuming elite support to be a decidedly positive step in a social movement’s trajectory, a more contextual analysis conceptualizes elite support as a complex, contingent factor. While such support often aids a social movement’s progress, it might also pose significant legal and political risks to the movement. My analysis reveals that elite support seems to help a movement when it leads to action that is procedurally or strategically consistent with the movement, even if there is some substantive or doctrinal dissonance. On the other hand, elite support may pose significant risk when it prompts action that is procedurally or strategically inconsistent with the movement, even if the action is substantively or doctrinally consistent with the movement’s position. Here I am describing the choice to undertake some action – whether legislative, executive, or court-centered – as procedural or strategic, and the claims or reasons asserted in support of the action as substantive or doctrinal. To map out this typology and to analyze the contingent, multidimensional effects of elite support on a social movement, I analyze four separate instances of elite support in the gay rights movement’s marriage equality campaign.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 13243 words || 
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2. Yavas, Mustafa. "Alienation of Elite Labor? Work Experience of Elite Global Business Professionals in New York and Istanbul" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1375527_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, I focus on the most prestigious fraction of middle class in contemporary Turkey, the global new middle class, which mostly consists of professionals and managers employed by prestigious transnational corporations and who are embedded in the transnational field of business. Drawing from interviews with the elite white-collars working in Istanbul and Turkish expats working in New York City, and from the emerging genre of self-reflexive books written by white-collars with the motto “de te fabula narratur,” I answer the following questions: What sorts of grievances and discontents do lie beneath the enviable life-styles and jobs of the prestigious white-collars? Why and how even elite business professionals can be dissatisfied with their works, and eventually, with their lives? In addition to burnout syndromes, the themes of inauthenticity, social isolation, performance pressure, and status anxiety constitute the elements of grievances that emerge in these interviews and texts. Relying on these findings, I argue for a case of the alienation of elite workers, and attempt to extend the theory of alienation.

2015 - Bergamo Conference on Curriculum Theory and Classroom Practice Words: 219 words || 
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3. Howard, Adam., Stewart, Patrick. and Thinley, Sangay. "Globally Elite: Educating for Global Citizenship within an Elite Context" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Bergamo Conference on Curriculum Theory and Classroom Practice, Bergamo Conference Center, Dayton, Ohio, Oct 15, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1075948_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although elite schools educate a relatively small percentage of the population, these institutions produce graduates who disproportionately occupy influential positions in business, industry, politics and the professions who have very influential networks (Cookson & Persell, 1985; Kenway & Koh, 2013). Research shows how, despite some internal differences in terms of class, race, gender and sexuality, such schools and their populations work intensely to repress internal fractions and frictions, to cohere populations and, overall, to ensure educational advantage and economic and social success (e.g. Walford, 1986). Their intense mobilization of resources and educationally and culturally ‘integrative’ practices and their highly selective intakes support this project. The largely qualitative research that has emerged recently (e.g., Gaztambide-Fernandez, 2009) illustrates how particular elite secondary schools undertake contemporary class making and how students themselves perceive their own privilege (e. g., Peshkin, 2001).

Although there has been a recent increase of focus on elite secondary schools throughout the world (e.g., Kenway & McCarthy, 2014), we know little about what lessons their students are taught about themselves, others, and the world around them. This paper draws on a multi-sited global ethnography on the self-understandings of students attending elite secondary schools in six countries (Australia, Brazil, Denmark, Ghana, Jordon, and Taiwan) to explore how global citizenship pedagogy and curriculum reinforce privilege as a collective identity within these schools.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Adams-Santos, Dominique. "Elite Schools, Exclusive Spaces: Symbolic Violence in the Residential System of an Elite Women’s College" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1120652_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While the landscape of U.S. higher education has become increasingly diversified, class and racial minorities continue to face challenges unique to their minority status, including lacking a sense of belonging in the academic and social aspects of college life. Current literature in sociology and education studies illuminate underrepresented students’ struggles in gaining access to higher education, as well as the academic problems that persist among students of subordinate groups. Other literature recognizes that while underrepresented students are gaining access to higher education, they are less likely to apply to and attend selective liberal arts schools. However, little scholarship has focused on the academic and social experiences of race and class minorities in the elite educational setting, a setting that has systematically excluded students of underrepresented groups. This case study uses qualitative methods, including textual analyses and student and staff interviews, and employs Pierre Bourdieu’s theories on symbolic violence, to examine residence life at a selective liberal arts college. Textual analyses and student interviews reveal the ways in which the college’s housing system privileges whiteness and affluence at the institutional and student level. Furthermore, findings suggest that the construction and perpetuation of a white affluent narrative within the college’s housing system excludes class and racial minority students, which adversely affects their sense of belonging in housing and in the college at large.

2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 9455 words || 
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5. Cummings, Craig. and Shapiro, Robert. "Studying the Effect of Elite Leadership on the Public's Policy Preferences and Confidence in Elites with a Split-Ballot Design" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p60838_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper we emphasize the need to use experimental designs to complement and supplement research on leadership and public opinion. While conventional individual level and aggregate level time series studies can provide compelling evidence regarding which leaders and what political communications can influence public opinion, further research is needed to address problems of causal inference in correlational and multivariate studies in identifying effects that can be attributed to the persuasive power of political leaders and others who attempt to influence the public. While the use of experiments is not new to studies of the effects on individuals of new information and the content of reports in the mass media, we advocate more directed and systematic effort to study the effects elites can have through the positions they take on important policy issues. Specifically, experiments should increasingly be used in tandem with other evidence in ways that can have external validity by attempting to simulate the complexity of processes of education and persuasion that can occur. While experimental studies of persuasion expose subjects to communications and information in controlled ways that do not correspond to what happens in real-world contexts, they can provide insight into what kinds of cause and effect relationships are possible. Experiments should use subjects that are representative of the public at large and expose them to some of the complexity of political communication and debate. Experimental designs should be developed to examine how multiple leaders or elites may address multiple issues, so that the public may be exposed to countervailing and conflicting messages. Perhaps most important, since experiments using national samples of adults are costly, we need efficient designs for studying these complicated possibilities of leadership and persuasion, that involve a number of possible influences at the same time. This should include also how leaders' position-taking can subsequently affect public attitudes toward these leaders. We describe how we have utilized a commonly used split-ballot design to study what can be simple or more complicated processes of influence on public opinion.

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