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2013 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 2083 words || 
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1. Torres, Kathryn. "Leadership Teams within Latino and ELL-Serving Schools: Team Discourse Surrounding Accountability and ELL Student Learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Hyatt Regency, Indianapolis, IN, Nov 04, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p674431_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Leadership for improving diverse student outcomes requires active problem-solving processes. However, school leaders in Latino and ELL-serving schools often struggle to utilize external expectations to support improvement activities. This case study examined team meetings within an elementary school that problematized and resolved group issues around sources of evidence, problems of practice, and instructional solutions. Findings indicate the potential for forming shared meaning around problems and solutions to practice within Latino and ELL serving schools.

2016 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 42 words || 
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2. Fones, Aliza. "High School English Language Learner (ELL) Teacher Agency and the Implementation of District ELL Program Policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Hilton Orlando, Orlando, Florida, <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1074700_index.html>
Publication Type: Colloquium Paper
Abstract: This qualitative study examined the agency of high school English Language Learner (ELL) teachers and their experiences implementing district ELL program policy. Within- and between-district comparison of ELL teachers’ revealed complex relationships between ELL teachers’ agency and the district policy context.

2018 - Association of Teacher Educators Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Judkins, Brandy. "Where Making meets ELL: Discussing a Collaborative, Makerspace Approach to ELL Methods" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators, Flamingo Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, Feb 16, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1297873_index.html>
Publication Type: Research Reports
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will discuss insights gained from collaboratively embedding design thinking experiences into an English language teaching methods (ELT) course for pre-service teachers.

2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 770 words || 
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4. Al-Bataineh, Adel. "The role of Differentiated Instruction (DI) in supporting English Language Learners (ELLs) in American School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 10, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634997_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Most educators would agree that classrooms today are filled with a wide variety of abilities and interests. In order to meet the academic, social, and emotional needs of all learners, many teachers implement a variety of differentiation techniques and methods. However, due to the overwhelming and ongoing nature of differentiation, many educators find the task daunting. This paper will investigate the role of Differentiated Instruction (DI) in supporting English Language Learners (ELLs) in American School.
The researchers sought to analyze teacher strategies for Differentiating Instruction and its impact in supporting ELLs abilities. It also focuses on examining teaches struggles and the reality of how differentiation is being implemented in today’s classroom with the enormous amounts of stresses and demands on teachers.
Classrooms today are more diverse than ever. Inclusion of special education students in general education classes, lack of funding for gifted education, increasing numbers of students whose first language is not English, new legislation, and a host of other factors seem to make differentiated instruction not only a common term used in educational companies, but also an increasing necessity in all classroom across the United States. The United States National Center for Educational Statistics (2003) reports that approximately 6 million students in the United States received special education services in 2001-2002 school year. Nearly four million are acquiring English as a second language. In addition to ELL learners, student diversity also can be seen in economic factors as well. Approximately 36% of students in the United States qualify for free or reduced lunch services. This information demonstrates the wide array of needs that students bring with them into classrooms across our nation
Differentiated instruction in its most simplistic state provides students with options for receiving information, comprehending the information, and demonstrating their learning (Tomlinson, 2001). In the 1970’s individualized instruction was a desired practice and thought to be an effective approach to teaching. However, there are differences between today’s differentiation and yesterday’s individualized instruction. Differentiation does not require a separate plan or lesson for each child within the classroom, which makes it much more manageable, and therefore more effective than individualized instruction (Tomlinson, 2001). Differentiated instruction provides numerous approaches and opportunities for students to encounter content, process material, and various ways to assess the content learned (Tomlinson, 2001). Differentiation also allows teachers to differentiate according to student differences such as readiness, interest, and rates of learning (Good, 2006). As one can imagine, differentiation requires a teacher to know his or her students and be in tune with the changing academic needs, as well as social and emotional needs. This process is just that - a process that is ever changing and differs for each student and each subject area. Many schools or districts may group students according to learning abilities through tracking, however at the classroom level the teacher is able to assess and meet students’ needs accordingly by knowing the students’ specific needs, interests, and rates of learning.
The majority of participants felt the most perceived effectiveness of DI was their differentiation of instructional approaches. This aligns with the fact that teacher participants have had the most training in this area of instructional approaches, therefore, researchers conclude that the more training and support teachers receive the more empowered teachers feel to implement DI in their classroom. The uncertainty regarding differentiation in assessments reflected in the survey responses may be reflective of the fluctuating nature of assessment practices in education today. There seems to be a push for using formative assessments to guide instruction, but not an abundance of professional development on how to implement that shift in thinking.
This study’s researchers conclude that teachers’ participants feel supported from their colleagues in their efforts to differentiate. This perceived support can be credited to the long history of supportive administrators who value differentiated instruction along with the fact that the school operates in teams and has an atmosphere of sharing. Not only does the Junior High School were this study participants teach have a history of supportive administration, they still report feeling strongly sustained in their efforts to differentiate. Although the researchers paired t test did not reveal a significant correlation between perceived effectiveness of DI and perceived support for DI, there is a high level of perceived support and perceived effectiveness at the Junior High School. Despite these results, this study researches still believe that the more supported teachers feel, the more effective teachers will be in their implementation of DI, which is also in agreement with the literature.

2012 - LRA 62nd Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 2292 words || 
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5. Lewis, Elizabeth. "Examining the Influences of Multimodal/Multimedia Composition on Adolescent ELLs’ Literacy Development and Identity Exploration" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 62nd Annual Conference, Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, San Diego, CA, Nov 28, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p578878_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

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