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2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 6085 words || 
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1. Shalin, Dmitri. "Emotional Wellness, Emotional Intelligence, and Emotion Template Analysis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p105621_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The relationship between the social and affective processes is a two-way street: society shapes its members’ affective life which, in turn, affects society’s basic processes. Democracy pays a heavy price when its members are emotionally illiterate, where emotional littering is rampant. This paper explores the interfaces between affective life and social processes. After discussing different ways of measuring emotional intelligence and its impact on democratic polity, the paper introduces the Emotional Template Matrix (ETM) analysis, a self-assessment tool designed to track emotional wellness, and describes the ETM Survey based on this methodology. The last section of this paper summarizes preliminary results of the ETM Survey.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Day, Kimberly., Neal, Amy., Smith, Cynthia. and Dunsmore, Julie. "Relations between Parent Emotion Coaching and Children’s Emotionality: The Importance of Cognitive and Emotional Self-Regulation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p957355_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Children with poor self-regulation have been found to be at risk for negative outcomes. Two important strategies of cognitive and emotion regulation are children’s private speech and effortful control, respectively; however, the joint impact of these strategies has not been examined within the same study. To address this, we investigated the interaction of private speech (PS) and effortful control (EC) as predictors of negative emotion, expecting that children who used less non-beneficial PS and had higher levels of EC would be less emotional. Additionally, parents who coach emotions teach their children how to regulate emotions and thus these children would be expected to have higher EC. Emotion coaching is child-centered and focuses on teaching through steps, similar to scaffolding. Because scaffolding has been found to relate to private speech, we expected that more emotion coaching would be related to less non-beneficial PS. We examined how PS and EC may be different regulation strategies that would both mediate the relation of parent emotion coaching to child negative emotionality.

Participants included 156 preschool-aged children (79 boys) and their primary caregivers. Parental emotion coaching was observationally measured as encouraging of negative emotion when discussing a time when children were upset. Transcribed and coded during a cognitively-focused card sorting task, children’s non-beneficial PS included: vocalizations (sounds that were not words; “Dookadooka”), task-irrelevant (unrelated to the task; “Roll and scroll roll and go”), and negatively-valenced task-relevant (related to the task but inhibited efforts; “But I can't do it by myself.”). Children’s EC (attention shifting, attention focusing, and inhibitory control) and negative emotion (anger and sadness) were measured using parent-report from the Child Behavior Questionnaire.

A path model using composite variables was investigated (Figure 1). Children’s EC significantly mediated the relation between parental emotion coaching and children’s negative emotionality. While emotion coaching did not predict children’s non-beneficial PS, children who used less of the non-beneficial PS were less emotionally negative. Children’s private speech and effortful control interacted to predict their negative emotion (Figure 2). It was found that children who were low in EC were high in negative emotion. However, the children with higher levels of EC were less negative when they also used less non-beneficial PS.

This research demonstrates the importance of considering both cognitive and emotional development together because private speech and emotion regulation interacted to predict negative emotionality. Parents who talked about causes and consequences of negative emotions had children who had higher levels of effortful control and in turn were less negative. Children may have learned how to handle negative emotions from their parents because of their acceptance of negative emotions. Even though emotion coaching was not associated with non-beneficial private speech, children who used more non-beneficial private speech were more negative. Most researchers focus on the beneficial forms of private speech in research, but these findings show that non-beneficial private speech is also an important measure of children’s self-regulation. Future research needs to include cognitive and emotional development together to have a complete understanding of children’s development of self-regulation.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7928 words || 
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3. Brown, Kenly. and Gonzales, Daisy. "Emotional Specialist or Emotional Wrecks? Emotional Labor in Police Civilian-interactions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p722464_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using Hochschild’s analysis of service providers’ emotional labor, this article identifies the interactional skills required for emotional labor to be performed in police work. Through a close analysis of police-civilian encounters (using the methods outlined in Heritage and Clayman, 2010), we examine four cases drawn from a larger database of encounters collected in a major city in California. These cases materialize routine mechanics through which police officers practice emotional labor in everyday interactions with civilians, and the range of outcomes these practices promote. We show how de-escalation and empathetic techniques lead to compliant and comforted civilians. Additionally, verbal irony and neutrality are observed as problematic uses of emotional labor that result in angry and frustrated civilians. This article provides a visual dataset and conversation analytical perspective of police officers practicing emotional labor in their interactions with civilians.

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