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2014 - SSSA Annual Meeting Words: 172 words || 
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1. Chavez, Mario. "Employment patterns employed by DACA recipients: What are the impacts of social capital on DACA recipient’s employment patterns?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SSSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Riverwalk, San Antonio, Texas, Apr 16, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p717857_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced that people who came to the US as children and meet certain criteria may request consideration for deferred action for two years and would be authorized for employment. This consideration is known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). This study investigates the employment patterns and conditions that DACA recipients experience after receiving legal status. This study analyzes 15 in-depth qualitative interviews with DACA recipients that were recruited by utilizing snowball sampling technique to unpack these patterns and conditions. A social capital theory instrument, strength-of-weak-ties, was utilized to determine if the use of social capital yielded positive or negative results. The results of this study compliment social capital theory, solidify Strength-of-Weak-Ties theory, and particularly provide support for either weak or strong ties. By understanding this phenomenon (DACA) we may begin to understand the impact that this type of legislation may have on the lives of the remaining undocumented immigrants. Then we may stipulate its impact on the economy and create policy accordingly.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 21 pages || Words: 6253 words || 
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2. Hipp, Lena. "Contracts, Confidence, and Continuous Employment. The Effects of Employment Institutions on Perceived Job and Employment Security" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p306974_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper investigates the impact of national labor market institutions on employees’ perceived job and employment security. While economists have looked at the effects of labor market institutions on employment outcomes, this paper is concerned with employees’ perceptions and expectations of employment outcomes. Can dismissal protection and unemployment benefits make workers feel secure about their jobs or, at least, make them less worried about the prospect of losing them? Multilevel modeling techniques are applied to analyze three cross-sectional panel datasets from the International Social Survey Program (ISSP) linked with country level information from the Organization for Cooperation and Economic Development (OECD). The analyses show that the actual strength of employment protection does not impact the perception of job security of all workers equally and has a recessive effect across time: With greater strength of dismissal protection, elderly workers are more confident about keeping their jobs, while their younger counterparts are less so. In 1989 and 1997 more stringent levels of employment protection still affected employees’ perceived job security positively, but this was no longer the case in 2005. More stringent levels of dismissal protection are also associated with lower levels of perceived labor market chances, especially for female workers, and more worries about losing a job. Based on these findings, pathways can be developed to address the concerns of those who are losing in the contemporary economic environment.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4193 words || 
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3. Morgan, Jennifer. and Dill, Janette. "Supporting Employability for Frontline Health Care Workers: Examining Employer Practices" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1379069_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many care work jobs are characterized by low job quality (low wages, few benefits, heavy workloads). One strategy to improve the quality of frontline health care job is to organize new advanced roles for workers that support quality and cost goals of health care organizations. This investment in the employability of care workers marks a rebalancing of risk that has been largely shifted to all workers but is particularly difficult for low wage workers to assume. The purpose of this research is to understand the development of these resources and partnerships in an effort to support job redesign, job quality and career advancement for medical assistants in primary care. Mixed methods case study data on four health systems are used to examine care team member roles, tasks and job quality before and after implementation of training to support work redesign intended to enhance MA roles in primary care. Data includes pre-post semi-structured interviews with key informants (N=128) (e.g., senior leaders, providers, human resource managers, and MAs) and quarterly administrative data collected on job quality and quality outcomes. Extensive educational infrastructure support was developed to support career ladder development for MAs including lengthened orientation, on-the-job training and skills assessments, in-person job shadowing, didactic learning and support for certification testing. Extensive human resources infrastructure support was developed to support career ladder implementation including standardizing job descriptions, promotion requirements, tailoring advanced roles (e.g. clinical, administrative and educational roles) and implementing career ladders. This study contributes to our understanding of the educational and employment supports needed to improve job quality in the health care sector for frontline care workers. Implications for educational institutions, labor market intermediaries, training funds and employers in varying labor market contexts will be discussed.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 9839 words || 
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4. Banerjee, Pallavi. "Subversive Self-employment: Intersectionality and Self-employment among Dependent Spouses of Indian Skilled-immigrant Workers in the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1379389_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Drawing on intersectionality theory, I examine how U.S. visa policies shape the informal self-employment experiences of Indian women and men who migrated to the U.S. on “dependent visas” to accompany their highly skilled spouses on temporary work visas. Dependent visa policy prohibits employment for the visa holders for a period that can last from six to twenty years. Despite this, only a handful (12 out 45) of those on dependent visas pursued informal self-employment in my sample, of which four were men and eight were women. This paper focuses on the self-employed dependent spouses and their experiences with self-employment, particularly their choice of businesses and the role of self-employment in their lives as dependents. I conclude that the complexities of the experiences of self-employment for my research participants are embedded in the intersections of their gender, class, race and immigration status. This, in turn, leads to self-employment becoming inadvertent acts of subversion.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10440 words || 
Info
5. Glavin, Paul., Filipovic, Tomislav. and van der Maas, Mark. "Precarious Versus Entrepreneurial Pathways into Self-Employment: Work and Nonwork Antecedents of Canadians’ Self-Employment Transitions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1377408_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: To what extent do contemporary self-employment trends reflect entrepreneurialism or labor market precariousness? We investigate the work, family and labor market antecedents associated with wageworkers’ transitions into self-employment. We distinguish between self-employment ventures that hire others from solo account operations. Analyses of a national panel survey of Canadian workers tracked over six years (Canadian Work, Stress, and Health Study) reveal that the solo account self-employed are approximately twice as likely to report low income (<$25,000) than wageworkers and the employer self-employed. Event history analyses based on a multinomial logit hazard model also reveal differences in the conditions that predict wageworkers’ transitions into each form of self-employment. Indicators of labor market insecurity predict the majority of self-employment transitions (solo account ventures), while job quality and good mental health predict entry into employer self-employment. Our findings support the value of using a ‘good jobs, bad jobs’ perspective to disaggregate the different pathways that wageworkers take into desirable versus less desirable forms of self-employment.

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