Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 2,098 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 420 - Next  Jump:
2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 21 pages || Words: 6253 words || 
Info
1. Hipp, Lena. "Contracts, Confidence, and Continuous Employment. The Effects of Employment Institutions on Perceived Job and Employment Security" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p306974_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper investigates the impact of national labor market institutions on employees’ perceived job and employment security. While economists have looked at the effects of labor market institutions on employment outcomes, this paper is concerned with employees’ perceptions and expectations of employment outcomes. Can dismissal protection and unemployment benefits make workers feel secure about their jobs or, at least, make them less worried about the prospect of losing them? Multilevel modeling techniques are applied to analyze three cross-sectional panel datasets from the International Social Survey Program (ISSP) linked with country level information from the Organization for Cooperation and Economic Development (OECD). The analyses show that the actual strength of employment protection does not impact the perception of job security of all workers equally and has a recessive effect across time: With greater strength of dismissal protection, elderly workers are more confident about keeping their jobs, while their younger counterparts are less so. In 1989 and 1997 more stringent levels of employment protection still affected employees’ perceived job security positively, but this was no longer the case in 2005. More stringent levels of dismissal protection are also associated with lower levels of perceived labor market chances, especially for female workers, and more worries about losing a job. Based on these findings, pathways can be developed to address the concerns of those who are losing in the contemporary economic environment.

2014 - SSSA Annual Meeting Words: 172 words || 
Info
2. Chavez, Mario. "Employment patterns employed by DACA recipients: What are the impacts of social capital on DACA recipient’s employment patterns?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SSSA Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, Riverwalk, San Antonio, Texas, Apr 16, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p717857_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced that people who came to the US as children and meet certain criteria may request consideration for deferred action for two years and would be authorized for employment. This consideration is known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). This study investigates the employment patterns and conditions that DACA recipients experience after receiving legal status. This study analyzes 15 in-depth qualitative interviews with DACA recipients that were recruited by utilizing snowball sampling technique to unpack these patterns and conditions. A social capital theory instrument, strength-of-weak-ties, was utilized to determine if the use of social capital yielded positive or negative results. The results of this study compliment social capital theory, solidify Strength-of-Weak-Ties theory, and particularly provide support for either weak or strong ties. By understanding this phenomenon (DACA) we may begin to understand the impact that this type of legislation may have on the lives of the remaining undocumented immigrants. Then we may stipulate its impact on the economy and create policy accordingly.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 3890 words || 
Info
3. Zhao, Menghan. "The Informal Employment of Floating Workers in Beijing and Its Transition to Formal Employment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1005722_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This article focuses on the informal employees in Beijing, most of who are floating people (migrants) and excluded from the social insurance system with low income and working in marginal labor market. By adopting the data from the Survey of the Working Condition of Floating People in Beijing, this article compared the socioeconomic status between the formal workers and informal workers of floating people and also tried to expand previous research by exploring the determinants of informal employment and the transition between formal and informal status, which is not single-track. The results showed that except for the higher income, former migrants, including relatives or friends, may also be the impetus for the floating people workers to join the informal employment. Besides, the education level of floating people tends to be the most important determinant of the working status. Ex-formal workers with lower educational level may even transit to informal ones.

2017 - The 13th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 149 words || 
Info
4. Dwaikat Shaer, Nuha., Hanley, Jill., Salamanca Cardona, Manuel., Ben Soltane, Sonia., Larios, Lindsay. and Henaway, Mostafa. "Longitudinal case studies of agency workers’ employment trajectories: “ Placement and Recruitment Agencies as silent partners in migrant employment”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 13th International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 17, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1240597_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Placement agencies became important players for access to employment for immigrants in Canada, who often face barrier accessing standard employment. There is mounting concern that the role of agencies and the alienation of workers from their de facto employers may leave workers vulnerable to social and labour rights abuses. To address these issues, our study explores the role that placement agencies play in immigrant workers' employment. We used a longitudinal case study of 40 agency workers, documenting their employment trajectories over three years. This presentation explores the strengths and weaknesses of such methodology. Also, the challenges we faced along the way, how we navigated them and its implications for our research. Preliminary findings show that agencies restrict immigrant workers equal access to the labour market and limit their integration and social network building. These findings shed light for policymakers and human rights’ organizations on the importance of regulating agencies.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 196 words || 
Info
5. Bellair, Paul., Vuolo, Mike., LaPlant, Eric. and Apel, Robert. "Specifying the Employment and Street Crime Relationship: Employment Matters Most When There Is No Illegal Income" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1276646_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Despite the somewhat pessimistic outcomes of correctional job program evaluations and some other unsupportive evidence, many scholars embrace the potential for redemption embedded in higher quality bonds to employment. We examine the relationship between employment and street crime (self-reported property and violent offenses) during a period spanning eighteen “street months” preceding a prison spell, nested within a random sample of 250 prisoners. The spell was the first for about sixty percent of the sample. Thus, the months reflect a period in which they are at high-risk for street crime. For the remainder, who experienced between one to five prior prison spells, the months reflect a period of reentry. Employment measures distinguish employment versus non-employment, wages, hours worked, and subjective job commitment. We find that higher wages are associated with diminished odds of street crime in the subsequent month. Going beyond previous research, we further distinguish employed participants by whether they earn illegal income, and that is consequential. When participants are employed and have no illegal income, the odds of street crime in the following month are reduced by about 75 percent and that explains away the impact of wages. We discuss the implications for public policy.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 420 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy