Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 807 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 162 - Next  Jump:
2015 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 457 words || 
Info
1. Baird, Rebecca. "Creating an Anti-Establishment Establishment: The Challenges of the Free Clinic Movement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Centre and Towers, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1016723_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: The Free Clinic Movement, beginning with the founding of the Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic in 1967, represented a major shift in America’s health care delivery system. Based off of the ideals of no-cost and non-judgmental health care, the free clinics worked to provide quality care to indigent and under-represented populations. While the Free Clinic Movement started in California, it quickly spread throughout the United States, creating a network of health clinics that all focused on the same goals but often used different methods and means to achieve them. The clinics utilized ideology of the 1960s, including the New Left and the growing counterculture, creating a movement that has lasted to the present day.

The Los Angeles Free Clinic represents one part of this larger movement; its use as a case study is ideal in discussing both the successes and the failures of this unique push to effect change in America’s fractured health care system. Founded in the Fall of 1967, just months after the creation of the Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic, the Los Angeles Free Clinic brought together a diverse group of community activists focused on public service. While the Los Angeles Free Clinic specifically, and the Free Clinic Movement more generally, were each successful in challenging the health care status quo, they did face challenges and obstacles of their own.

This paper will focus on the challenges and miseries of the Los Angeles Free Clinic within the broader perspective of the Free Clinic Movement as a whole. While the 1960s “flower children” are often perceived as joy-filled free spirits, the realities of their existence and their lifestyle choices were quite different. Outcast from mainstream society, this group often had no place to turn to for help, especially when it came to health care. The challenges of the counterculture existence were exacerbated by life on the street. The free clinics sought to address these very real conditions and to provide aid to those who had no other options. Still, the clinics faced challenges and miseries of their own, fighting local community groups who disagreed with their methods and attitudes, and with local government organizations who saw the clinics as a threat and a community annoyance. When the free clinics ultimately banded together to create a national organization, internal conflict ensued which threatened to break up the Movement completely. All together, these problems demonstrate the challenges in creating a formal establishment based on anti-Establishment principles. The attempt to juxtapose counterculture ideologies with bureaucracy meant that struggles would abound. While free clinics such as the Los Angeles Free Clinic worked to legitimize their operations, they had to avoid alienating their unique client base as well.

2011 - 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 30 words || 
Info
2. Sack, Richard. "Historical context and factors that led to the establishment establishment of ADEA" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493591_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The is paper will review the historical context under which ADEA was created in 1988 and the factors that led to its establishment and its subsequent evolution over the years

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Words: 23 words || 
Info
3. Best, Robin. "Establishment-Party Polarization and Support for Non-Establishment-Parties in Advanced Industrialized Democracies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1350396_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Low levels of polarization among establishment-parties are found to encourage support for non-establishment-parties by increasing both protest and ideological votes for non-establishment parties.

2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 58 pages || Words: 23870 words || 
Info
4. Goldford, Dennis. "Establishing a General Theory of the Establishment Clause" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 20, 2006 <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p139606_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper seeks to articulate a general theory of the Establishment Clause based upon a pairing of a new principle of nonestablishment and a concept of coercion richer than what we normally find.

2016 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 231 words || 
Info
5. Berry, Matthew. "Did the Hung Kings Establish the Country or Did the Party Establish the Hung Kings? A Critical Examination of Socialist Archaeology in the DRV" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, <Not Available>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1054027_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In 1958 Bronze Age artifacts were discovered at Phùng Nguyên. Observers were quick to note the site lay only ten kilometers from the Temple of the Hung Kings, where in 1954 Hồ Chí Minh addressed troops about to take Hanoi by stating, “The Hung Kings established the country, now we must preserve it.” The task of scientifically validating President Hồ’s historical claim fell to the Institute of Archaeology and its director, Phạm Huy Thông. To prove the existence of the Hung Kings whilst demonstrating the superiority of socialist archaeology over its colonial and capitalist counterparts, Director Phạm required a vigorous scholarly offensive. The Institute of Archaeology thus held four conferences and published the proceedings in a series entitled The Hung Kings Established the Country.
From 1968 to 1971, eighty-two participants from fifteen institutions presented nearly two hundred papers addressing all manner of questions related to the Hung Kings, from radiocarbon dating to marriage and burial customs. Whereas early conferences saw a profusion of ideas and critical arguments, by the final conference Director Phạm was determined to bring things back together, summarize findings, and claim victory on behalf of the masses of Vietnam. By examining these conference records, I will show how alternative viewpoints were suppressed in the interest of fashioning a scientifically proven narrative whose outline and conclusion had been pre-ordained by Communist Party leadership.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 162 - Next  Jump:

©2018 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy