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2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10320 words || 
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1. Flockhart, Tyler. "Family, Evangelicalism and Gender: How Family and Marriage Inform Gender Ideology among College-Age Evangelical Men" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p721865_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Because family serves as a central function in organizing family life among evangelicals, prior research considering the relationship between evangelicalism, family and gender does so in a manner that focuses predominantly on married evangelicals. The present article provides a contribution to the literature by using in-depth interviews to explore how ten unmarried college-age evangelical men use the evangelical family and marriage as resources to draw from in order to make sense of their current gender role ideologies. The findings suggest that participants (1) draw from the gender relations enacted by their parents during childhood; (2) use the family as a model for “practicing” to be a godly husband and leader; and (3) use a combination of biology and evangelicalism to justify the roles of women and men. Among this sample of unmarried college-age evangelical men, the Christian marriage and family remain central resources that these men draw from when constructing their gender role ideologies.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 50 pages || Words: 14597 words || 
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2. Kaufman, Jason., Bean, Lydia. and Gonzalez, Marco. "Are American Evangelicals More Politically Conservative Than Canadian Evangelicals? An Empirical Investigation Using Multiple Data Sources" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p103746_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper contributes to the existing literature on the political role and influence of Evangelical Protestants in the United States by comparing them alongside Canadian Evangelicals using both quantitative and qualitative data. Our findings contrast with those of previous studies in several ways: First, we find, using survey data, that American Evangelical Protestants are not necessarily as fiscally conservative or anti-government as previously thought; Second, our interview data show that, in some ways, Canadian Evangelicals are actually more devout, more committed to their religious identity than their American counterparts, contrary, again, to common belief. In sum, we find surprising similarities in the political/moral values of Canadian and American Evangelicals but also surprising dissimilarities in their professed political affiliations and goals. Theoretically, these results are reminiscent of Gorski’s (2000) observations about the changing relationship between the religious sphere and other social spheres in post-Reformation Europe: Amidst an increasingly secular Canadian society, Canadian Evangelicals have become both more religiously devout and more politically mainstream. In the US, by contrast, Evangelicalism is rather mainstream, while, at the same time, Evangelicals have used matters of faith as rallying cries for political upheaval and electoral mobilization. These trends are a result, we believe, of the small numbers and marginal social profile of Evangelicals in Canada, in contrast to their widespread presence and influence in the United States. The different construction of political parties and federal-local jurisdiction in these two polities has also influenced the role of Evangelical religious networks in the political sphere.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 8225 words || 
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3. Monsma, Stephen. "The Evangelicals are Coming! The Increasing Involvement of Evangelical Protestants in Providing Human Services and its Public Policy Consequences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p86570_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper presents mounting evidence that evangelical Protestant organizations are becoming more active in providing needed human services than are mainline Protestant organizations, and explores the public policy implications of this trend.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 19 pages || Words: 4707 words || 
Info
4. Kang, Jennifer. "Religious Values, Cultural Normatives, and Civil Society: Korean-American Evangelicals' Evangelicalism and Civic Engagement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p242526_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Abstract: In an age of changing demographics in America, sociologists should consider studying the interplay of religion and culture in the lives of the religious young adults in America. Ecklund (2006) posits that Korean-American evangelicals in fact could serve as a model for civic involvement in their generation, carrying with them a strong background in church attendance as well as strong work ethic principles from their parents, among other qualities as young religious adults. In this study, I propose after the review of the literature a causal model tracing the combined effects of religious values and cultural normatives in religious young adults, and the resulting form of evangelicalism they hold, which in turn leads them toward certain types of civic activity. I propose studying particular Korean-American evangelicals and non-evangelicals (non-religious) young adults in America, with a sample of roughly 15-20 young adults, predicting that first-generation cultural influences are strong in effects on second-generation religious young adults and non-religious young adults, such that the Protestant work ethic predominates their thinking, even overshadowing altruistic motives within their consciousness when making major decisions, such as choosing whether to serve in social work settings through their churches or area civic groups.

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