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2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10076 words || 
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1. Boguslaw, Alissa. "Towards a New Sociology of Events: Living, Moving Events in Post-conflict Kosovo" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1378648_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Major, historical events, especially the kinds that radically transform everything about an individual or a society, are never linear trajectories. They can be confusing, chaotic, and many time, we do not even know when we are in one. The problem with way we normatively and theoretically approach events is under the assumption that they begin and end like the narratives we use to make sense of them. Narratives force events into storylines, preventing us from seeing and analyzing them as they are—living and moving. Whether extraordinary transformations like wars, declarations of independence, and political transitions, or everyday encounters, like birth, love, and death, events do not begin and end, but take different shapes and morph into new ones, as actors intervene, contexts shift, and other events cross their paths. Whether taking the form of a breaking-news headline, handshake, official report, monument, memorial, or tweet, it is the hand-offs of different forms which keep events alive (Wagner-Pacifici 2017). Breaking with traditional approaches to the study of historical events, this paper advances a new sociology of events, equipped with new analytical tools to investigate them, following the developments of Robin Wagner-Pacifici (2017). This comprehensive approach allows us to track ongoing events and better understand what happens to events and their meanings as they live and move across time and space. As they constantly undergo processes of bounding and unbounding, it is impossible to entirely determine the limits of an event. But because events are impacted by contact with other events, how do we locate the boundaries of one as it collides with another? How do we know which event we are in?

2010 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 100 words || 
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2. Gordon, Heidi., Connolly, Deborah. and Lee, Kang. "Children's reports of a personally experienced event: The effect of event frequency, modality, and prompt specificity on accuracy and language" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Mar 18, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p398540_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The current study examined the influence of event frequency, modality, and interview prompt specificity on accuracy and language used when describing an event. One hundred twenty-five children (Mage = 7.22 years, SD = 0.63 years) either read a story about a magician or watched a live magic show, which occurred one, four, or six times. Children in the single-event condition provided more correct responses about the magic story/show than children in the repeat-event conditions. However, report accuracy and specificity varied as a function of interview prompt for repeat-event children but not single-event children. Implications for interviewing child witnesses are discussed.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 200 words || 
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3. Forst, Brian. and Cubukcu, Suat. "Are Open-Source Reports of Terrorist Events Crowded Out by Other Major News Events?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1029568_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Open source data on terrorism are rich in contributing to our understanding of terrorism. Largely unknown, however, is the extent and nature of reporting biases in the data. This study inquires into one source of reporting bias: the episodic crowding out of news about terrorism events by other more serious events. We test this effect on the reporting of terrorist events in open source data by focusing on major catastrophic disasters, which receive extensive media coverage. The data on terrorism events is taken from the Global Terrorism Database (GTD), the most comprehensive data collected on terrorism, based mainly on publicly available information through the mass media. We look at the impact of the 20 most fatal disasters in the two decades from 1994 to 2013. The data on disasters is gathered through The International Disaster Database (EM-DAT). We compare the number of global terrorist attacks that are reported in the seven days prior to these major disasters with those reported during seven days following the disasters. We test the crowding-out hypothesis by comparing the mean differences of non-fatal terrorist attacks and the percent of non-fatal terrorist attacks reported in the GTD across the periods immediately before and after the disasters.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 255 words || 
Info
4. Wolfgram, William. and Stevens, Casey. "The Uses of Historical Narrative: Events and Non-Events in the Field of International Relations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p179116_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Much of the literature in international relations theory relies on historical narrative to support a particular theoretical position. For such a strategy to be effective, these historical narratives must be presented as coherent, meaningful, and relevant for the theoretical purposes the author specifies. This paper proposes to read historical narrative in international relations theory through the work of Jacques Derrida, and his concept of the ?event.? In particular, we examine how historical events become meaningful when articulated in the service of particular subjectivities, and how, as events of import, their elevated status affects the marginalization of other events, people, and subjectivities. The point here is greater than the observation that ?The winners write the history books.? What is at stake in the writing of historical events, we argue, is the production, reproduction, and limitation of particular kinds of thought about the possibilities of continuity and change in international political life. Specifically, in this paper, we look at the example of how the codification of World War I works to erase the role of anarchist thought in the political history of early 20th century Europe in order to support a statist conceptualization of the causes of large-scale war. We consider how of the role of anarchism is written (or written out) in: a) early coverage of WWI; b) contemporary IR analyses of WWI, and; c) Joseph Conrad?s The Secret Agent, in order to explain how ?the event? both creates and marginalizes political subjects, as well as to explore how else these historical subjectivities could be written.

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