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2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 51 pages || Words: 16672 words || 
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1. Gourevitch, Peter. "Political Explanations of Corporate Governance Regulation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-11-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p64334_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We explore the role of politics in shaping patterns of corporate governance, and in explaining why patterns differ.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 10108 words || 
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2. Pedahzur, Ami. "The Changing Profile of Palestinian Suicide Bombers: A COR Theory Explanation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-11-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p40695_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: THE CHANGING NATURE OF SUICIDE ATTACKS – A SOCIAL NETWORK PERSPECTIVE
In recent years, there has been a breakthrough in the study of the phenomenon of suicide terrorist attacks. Various studies showed how suicide bombers were used as a means to force elements in the international arena to alter their policy in asymmetrical territorial disputes, or as a factor that explains the increase or decrease in public support. Those studies paved the way for employing rational assumptions and an organizational perspective in explaining this phenomenon. Despite the wide range of factors used in these analyses, it appears that all the researchers view organizations and their elites as central figures in the initiation of suicide attacks.
Most of these studies substantiate their claims on the basis of case studies of organizations such as Hezbollah, the LTTE, the PKK, and the various Palestinian organizations. The key to this impressive theoretical advancement lies in the fact that all these organizations featured an orderly hierarchical structure that operated according to the directives of a leader or an identified echelon of leaders. Additionally, these organizations have all proclaimed the liberation of territory or struggle for the rights of a certain ethnic minority as their raison d’etre.
The paradox which is the current article’s point of reference is that the majority of these organizations, apart from the Palestinian ones, ceased employing suicide bombers at the end of the last decade. Nevertheless, suicide terror has not become a thing of the past. In fact, quite the opposite. The number of suicide attacks in the last 5 years is 2.7 times greater in comparison to the period beginning in the 1980s and lasting until 1999; and the use of human bombs only increases. Even so, while the number of suicide attacks perpetrated by established organizations with hierarchical structures is on the decline, the numbers of attacks carried out by organizations lacking an easily identifiable structure or established leadership is on the rise.
In order to comprehend the development of suicide attack terrorism of recent years, and especially with regard to both Al-Qaeda and the Palestinian organizations, we suggest that the organizational approach should be substituted with a social network perspective. By using social network analysis on Palestinian suicide networks, we found that in contrast to the prevailing perception, which views suicide attacks as a product of strategic decisions made within organizational frameworks, to a great extent, decisions were actually made by local activists, and struggles between local and family groups proved to be the best predictor in their decisions to act in this manner. We also found that the networks of suicide terrorism do not develop arbitrarily or without a guiding hand, rather that, over the course of time, their hubs (actor at the center of the map where most connections in the network either lead to or derive from) proved to be the main vehicle in getting various actors to join the network. Another important finding was that a share characteristic of most networks is the peripheral nature of the suicide bombers in them. That support the assumptions of most researchers in this field, i.e., the suicide bomber is a weapon in the service of the elite, which prefers to send individuals who are of minor importance and who contribute little to the continued operation of the network.
Finally, we found that the existence of cohesive subgroups within a network have proven to be a predictor of the network’s effectiveness, as well the number of hubs a network has, the more suicide attacks it carries out the more hubs are operating in it. We end the paper by showing that network analysis can also be of considerable assistance from the standpoint of combating suicide attacks. To demonstrate; on the one hand, we identify the network’s central actors and the figures who are essential for its continued existence, or, by the same token, whose absence would bring about its collapse. On the other hand, we predict who are the actors with the greatest potential in becoming suicide bombers according to their location in the network.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 39 pages || Words: 10269 words || 
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3. Eidlin, Fred. "Two Kinds of Explanation in Social Science: Finding a Cause Versus Conceptual Breakthrough" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-11-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p209885_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: All explanations are “efforts to deprive puzzles, mysteries, and blockages of their force, and hence, existence" (Brown, 1963: 41). In everyday usage many kinds of statements may serve as explanations. While the search for explanations is also at the heart of social science, most social scientists would agree that scientific explanations must meet higher standards than those of everyday life or of magical systems, for example. A scientific explanation, it is widely believed, removes the puzzling character of a phenomenon by giving its cause. Some mechanism is found, the phenomenon is shown to be a specific case of some law-like generalization, or a gap in initial conditions is discovered and filled. But there is a different genre of explanation that is usually overlooked in accounts of scientific explanation. This is explanation by conceptual breakthrough. A conceptual breakthrough removes the problematic character of a phenomenon by inventing some new way of looking at the phenomenon that breaks through a blockage in thought. It accomplishes this, not by finding previously unknown facts or law-like generalizations or mechanisms, but by seeing things in a new way. New knowledge in science often consists of such imaginative breakthroughs. The problematic character of a puzzling phenomenon is often rooted in assumptions that have been taken to be self-evident, or held unconsciously. Such assumptions are often provided by some conceptual framework, theory, paradigm, or commonsense way of looking at reality. Scientific discovery often consists of such a wrenching away from taken-for-granted ways of thinking. Known facts or data are seen in a new way, a new vision is invented. To be sure, an explanation by conceptual breakthrough must work. The phenomenon to be explained (the explicandum) must be deducible from the explicans that is, from initial conditions and law like generalizations, or mechanisms. Yet it is the removal of a blockage in thought, a new imaginative construction, or some new way of looking at the facts that solves the problem that gave rise to inquiry. It is thus the conceptual breakthrough, not new facts, mechanisms, or law-like generalizations that actually do the explaining. The new vision represented by a conceptual breakthrough may include as signal some of what had been excluded as noise by the vision it replaced. Or, it may exclude as noise information that figured as signal in the replaced explanatory account. In this paper, a view of explanation as problem-solving is provided, which integrates various kinds of causal and stochastic explanation with conceptual breakthrough. I argue that there can be genuine growth of or improvement of knowledge which, rather than giving a cause, consists in breaking out of old, established ways of thinking, and inventing new ways of interpreting or constructing the facts. It is the new vision or discovery, not new facts or laws that solves the problem.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 12470 words || 
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4. Keister, Jennifer. "Towards A Resource-Based Explanation for Insurgent Behavior: A Relational Contracting Model" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-11-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p210691_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Insurgencies require resources with which to support their campaign. The mechanisms by which insurgencies chose to fulfill their resource needs and the consequences of the manner in which they do so have not yet been fully explored. This paper argues that the source and terms of resource extraction may be understood in contracting terms, and that sources of variation across groups and within groups over time may be explained by a bargaining framework. This bargain has important ramifications for a variety of insurgent behaviors; including how and why they treat various populations in different ways, why some engage in extremely coercive behavior towards civilians while other insurgencies build social services, and so on.
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document

2003 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 4793 words || 
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5. Deibert, Gini. "Teens, Drugs and the American Dream: A Partial Test of American Institutional Explanations of Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-11-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p107203_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The American Dream has long served as an explanation for crime causation for predatory crimes. This paper extends previous research by applying American institutional explanations of crime to a less serious crime: substance abuse among teenagers. Using data from Monitoring the Future (1976-2000), this paper provides partial testing of two competing theories: Lafree’s Losing Legitimacy (1998), and Messner and Rosenfeld’s Crime and the American Dream (2001). After an extensive theoretical review, these theories are then tested using multivariate analyses. The preliminary results indicate support for the institutional anomie theory presented by Messner and Rosenfeld. The implications for future research are discussed.

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