Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 150 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 30 - Next  Jump:
2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 7968 words || 
Info
1. Stewart, Nathan. "High School Debate and Extra-Curricular Activities: An Examination of the Perceived Effects that Debate Participation has on other Extra-Curricular Activities in High School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p365958_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The academic climate in our high schools emphasizes heavy and diverse participation in extracurricular activities for college admissions. Competitive academic debate is an extensively studied extracurricular activity that has proven to be beneficial for students’ college preparation. This paper examined how high school students perceived their participation in competitive academic debate in relation to other extracurricular activities. Implications for future application of the results and the method present the heuristic characteristics of this inquiry.

2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
2. Chung, Erin. "Incorporating the Noncitizen: Immigrants, Foreign Residents, and Extra-Electoral Forms of Political Participation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p64215_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the relationship between citizenship policies and noncitizen political behavior, focusing on extra-electoral forms of political participation by Korean residents in Japan. I analyze the institutional factors that have mediated the construction of Korean collective identity in Japan and, in turn, the ways that Korean community activists have re-conceptualized possibilities for their exercise of citizenship as foreign residents in Japan. My empirical analysis is based on a theoretical framework that defines citizenship as an interactive process of political incorporation, performance, and participation. I posit that the various dimensions of citizenship—its legal significance, symbolic meaning, claims and responsibilities, and practice—are performed, negotiated, and restructured in a triangular interactive relationship between the state, citizens, and noncitizens.
I address a puzzle that is both specific to Koreans in Japan and generalizable to foreign permanent residents in other advanced industrial democracies: Given their high levels of cultural assimilation, why does citizenship remain the last vestige of identity within the Korean community in Japan? Unlike previous studies that have focused on stringent citizenship policies at the level of the state alone, this paper explores the interactive process between institutions and communities. Based on their legal status, we would expect social movements in Japan’s Korean community to center around the quest for citizenship acquisition. Yet, the findings of this paper demonstrate that Korean organizations have concentrated their efforts on securing the community’s foreign citizenship status. I argue that postwar Japan’s ethnocultural citizenship policies both shaped Korean political identity in Japan and structured political opportunities for Korean activists to negotiate the terms of their community’s incorporation. Especially in recent years, new generations of Korean activists have reinterpreted the meaning of Korean citizenship as identity and practice in movements to democratize Japanese society. Rather than naturalize and become a small section of the voting population, Korean activists have increasingly used their noncitizen status as their “voice” to express their opposition to state policies. Based on ethnographic research conducted in Tokyo, Kawasaki, and Osaka over a twelve-month period, this paper explores how citizenship policies affect the political identities, claims, and strategies of noncitizen communities.

2005 - International Studies Association Pages: 43 pages || Words: 12042 words || 
Info
3. Sarkees, Meredith. and Wayman, Frank. "Inter-State, Intra-State, and Extra-State Wars, 1816-2003" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p72020_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper reviews the five-and-a-half years of data that can now be added to the findings in Sarkees, Wayman, and Singer (2003). The period has raised interesting questions about trends in types of war. First, there have been three recent extra-state wars (Chechnya, Israel-Palestine, and Iraq 2004), a remarkable revival of a type of war that had disappeared for over two decades. There have been several inter-state wars since 1997, an increase in incidence of a type of war that had become very rare from 1990 to 1997. Of course, intra-state wars remain the most common type of conflict. The COW project has also identified a number of new conflicts of over 1,000 battle deaths that should be added to the 1816-1997 period, almost all involving non-state actors.

2008 - APSA Teaching and Learning Conference Pages: 7 pages || Words: 2132 words || 
Info
4. Ediger, Ruth. "Assessing the Usefulness of Extra-Textbook Materials" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Teaching and Learning Conference, San Jose Marriott, San Jose, California, Feb 22, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p245573_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Many ubiquitous issues plague higher education in the United States. Currently two of the many prevalent challenges are the level of geographic literacy and the price of college textbooks. The former is portrayed as woefully lacking and the latter as rising ridiculously higher every year. In a broad sense, this study intends to address both of these issues by conducting a study of the effectiveness of textbook supplements for geographic literacy.
Because many smaller colleges and universities offer few or no classes in geography, one way to combat geographic illiteracy is to integrate geographic learning into a variety of academic subjects, such as history and political science. However, materials integrating geographic knowledge into such subjects often are not included in standard textbooks and instead are added as textbook supplements. Including these supplementary materials contributes to the rise in the price of textbooks. If these supplements are found to be effective in increasing geographic literacy, then perhaps the additional cost is worthwhile.
This research involves determining the impact of specific textbook supplements on student proficiency as measured by quiz grades. Students from six undergraduate classes (GEO1110 World Regional Geography, UCOR2000 The West and the World, POL2330 International Relations) over two quarters (winter and fall 2007) are invited to participate in the research population (a potential total of 200 students) where the usefulness of extra-textbook resources is assessed using student quiz grades and survey responses. The data is analyzed with respect to the following question: how do the textbook supplements, alone or in combination, impact quiz grade, controlling for a student’s previous travel experience? This study adds to the growing research assessing supplementary materials for lower-division undergraduate education by seeking to determine which, if any, of the extra-textbook resources increase student performance.
The findings here suggest three things. First, textbook supplements can be beneficial as measured by student grades but since different testing procedures will make different study methods useful, it is up to the instructor to incorporate textbook supplements. Secondly, encouraging students to travel even for short periods of time can help their geographic knowledge as judged by quiz scores. And finally, breaking up large amounts of information into more than one test can improve student test scores.
Supporting Publications:
Supporting Document

2009 - ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE" Words: 37 words || 
Info
5. Jac, Alicja. "Intra and Extra EU Migraiton after Integration" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 50th ANNUAL CONVENTION "EXPLORING THE PAST, ANTICIPATING THE FUTURE", New York Marriott Marquis, NEW YORK CITY, NY, USA, Feb 15, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p312773_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this article, I will examine the literature on population mobility, multilateral economic agreements, bilateral immigration agreements and domestic immigration control policies in order to assess whether it is integration into the EU that is causing in

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 30 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy