Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 444 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 89 - Next  Jump:
2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 320 words || 
Info
1. Nalder, Kimberly. and Martin, Danielle. "The Facts as I See Them: Gender Bias and Fact Checking in Presidential Campaigns" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 30, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1248866_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Amidst rising popularity of fact checking organizations and live fact checking during presidential debates, we question how gender bias and politically motivated reasoning influences voters’ response to fact checking. To test how voters respond to fact checks, we use an experimental design administered with two samples: a representative sample of Californians conducted the week prior to the 2016 California primary election and a student sample during general election presidential debate watch events. Our experiment manipulates whether participants see information from Politifact, a non-partisan fact checking organization, showing Hillary Clinton as the most truthful 2016 presidential candidate, then asks all participants to rate Clinton, Bernie Sanders, and Donald Trump on a series of valence items, including truthfulness and competence. We also ask participants to rate the reliability of fact checking organizations and the extent of sexism in the United States. We find that both gender bias and motivated reasoning play a role in participants’ evaluations of fact checking organizations and how much fact checks influence candidate evaluations. Participants with traditional gender role opinions rate Clinton lowest on truthfulness and competence. This evidence of gender bias persists even for participants who see Politifact ratings showing Clinton as the most truthful presidential candidate, indicating that fact checks have little impact relative to gender stereotypes. Democrats and Clinton supporters are the most likely to be influenced by the Politifact ratings, likely because the fact check shows their candidate as the most truthful, while Republicans and Trump supporters are the least likely to rate Politifact as reliable or Clinton as trustworthy. Viewing Politifact ratings appears to reinforce preconceived evaluations of candidates – evidence of motivated reasoning. Overall, our research shows that exposure to fact checks does not necessarily prompt the desired response of evaluating political information and candidates. Rather, fact checks may simply reinforce gender and political biases, exemplifying the adage that you can lead a horse to water, but cannot make him drink.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 10197 words || 
Info
2. Graves, Lucas. "Operating the Truth-O-Meter: Institutional Facts and the Epistemology of Fact-Checking" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p984712_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: How do professional fact-checkers reach factual conclusions in thorny political debates? Using a case study from ethnographic fieldwork with a major fact-checking outlet, this paper offers an in-depth examination of the newswork routines of journalists who specialize in testing the truth of political claims. Fact-checkers have been faulted for a "naïve” epistemology that fails to distinguish between matters of fact and of political opinion or ideology. I suggest an alternative view grounded in the notion of “institutional facts,” arguing that such facts are much less stable than we usually suppose -- and that this helps to account for fact-checking practices and for the controversy this emergent news genre invites. Drawing on studies of investigative journalism and of scientific work, I argue that objective practice among fact-checkers similarly highlights the role of tacit knowledge and trust in certifying facts, and thus the “intimate interdependence” of fact and value.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 192 words || 
Info
3. Henson, Abigail. "The Facts about FACT: An Evaluability Assessment of a Fatherhood Prison Program" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 15, 2016 <Not Available>. 2018-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1161008_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In order for an organization to provide services that are effective and efficient, it is of the utmost importance to determine whether best practices are being enacted through an evaluability assessment. An evaluability assessment improves a program by articulating the program’s measurable actions, clearly defining the program’s stated goals and determining whether they are being met by the particular processes in place, and ultimately producing a logic model that bounds the program, roots the program in theory, and can be used in later evaluations and grant proposals. Fathers and Children Together, a fatherhood program created at SCI Graterford with the objectives of reconnecting incarcerated fathers with their children in order to prevent delinquency and later criminality of the children, was initially established in 2012; however the organization has never been evaluated. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct this study in order to ensure that goals are being met, provided services are grounded in theory, and outcomes are measurable. The process of the evaluability assessment, including thorough document analysis and semi-structured interviews will be discussed, as well as the preliminary findings, difficulties and challenges encountered during the study, and recommendations for program improvement.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 89 - Next  Jump:

©2018 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy