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2008 - The Mathematical Association of America MathFest Words: 60 words || 
Info
1. Horton, Leslie. "Factor, Factor - Who's Got the Factor?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Mathematical Association of America MathFest, TBA, Madison, Wisconsin, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p276299_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: My students in developmental algebra not only struggle with factoring quadratics,
but also often refuse to even try to learn the methods because of past failure.
This semester they were encouraged to at least try to factor
by a point system that gave partial credit for small successes:
for example, credit was given for correctly identifying the number of parentheses needed in the solution.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 89 words || 
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2. Jolliffe, Darrick., Sanchez-Perez, Noelia. and Farrington, David. "Empathy and Offending: Risk Factor, Promotive Factor, Protective Factor or ‘Middle Class Value'?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1029062_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Low empathy is a key individual difference proposed to have an impact on the likelihood of offending. The main aim of this paper was to investigate whether low empathy is best considered a risk factor, a promotive factor, an interactive protective factor or was unrelated to self-reported offending in a sample of 720 adolescents. The results suggested that empathy was a risk factor for frequent and serious offending but also had interactive protective effects for certain offenses. In addition the results differed considerably for males and females.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 33 pages || Words: 10722 words || 
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3. Steffek, Jens. "Explaining Cooperation between IGOs and NGOs: Push Factors, Pull Factors, and the Policy Cycle" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p252320_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The ever closer collaboration between many intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) is empirically well described but poorly theorized. The aim of this paper is to deliver a general theoretical framework for analyzing emergent patterns of cooperation between IGOs and NGOs, which may be used to generate hypotheses or guide comparative studies. The starting point is a rationalist conception of organizational actors as purposeful but resource-dependent. The paper then combines a ‘resource exchange perspective’ from organizational sociology with the model of a policy cycle from comparative politics. The result is an analytical framework that allows us to identify incentives for, as well as obstacles to, IGO-NGO cooperation along all phases of the policy cycle. In a concluding section the limits of this model and the underlying rationalist assumptions are discussed.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 29 pages || Words: 14514 words || 
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4. Goodrich, Ben. "The Vectors of Mind Is a Terrible Thing to Waste: An Algorithm for Inferring the Number of Common Factors in Factor Analytic and Related Models" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p362122_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Selecting the number of factors to include in a factor analysis model is a fundamental and long-standing question in psychometrics and other fields that utilize related models. In political science, this question of dimensionality arises in factor analysis models of survey responses, item-response theory models of legislative and judicial behavior, classifications of welfare state regimes, assigning democracy ratings, and other situations. However, these models unfortunately require the number of dimensions to be specified in advance, rather than left unspecified and subsequently inferred from the estimates. The estimator presented in this paper remedies this problem by going back to theoretical ideas that were put forward in the literature before computers were invented but were impossible to implement at the time. With substantively minor modifications, these ideas are feasible today and allow researchers to consistently estimate a factor analysis model whose primary purpose is to infer the number of factors from the output of the model. From there, the researcher can then estimate a different model that takes the dimensionality as given. An empirical example is given that illustrates all the steps in the algorithm.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 11176 words || 
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5. Kam, Jennifer. and Cleveland, Michael. "Discrimination as a Communication-based Risk Factor for Latina/o Youth’s Substance Use: Do Parent and Peer Resources Act as Protective Factors?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p305421_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: With general strain theory, it was hypothesized that as Latina/o youth experience discrimination, they are more likely to develop strain and then more likely to use substances. Two additional hypotheses examined how parents and peers function as buffers, decreasing the likelihood that strained youth will use substances. Latina/o youth (N = 728) from 23 schools in Phoenix, AZ completed surveys at three waves over two years. SEM results only provided support for the first hypothesis.

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