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2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 34 pages || Words: 12430 words || 
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1. Kim, Moonhawk. "Trading Freely and Fairly: Distinguishing Sincere versus Protectionist "Fair Trade" Countries" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p253247_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Politicians from developed countries have recently increased demands for "fair trade" policies. The main claim is that inferior regulatory standards in other countries---e.g. lower labor standards---are unfair and constitute legitimate basis for imposing trade restrictions. Given that such rhetoric may be disingenuous, why do states pursue fair trade policies? The policies might be based on genuine societal values (i.e. belief in the morality of strong labor standards). Alternatively, the policies might simply be disguised protectionism. Although the insincere type has incentives to appear as the sincere type, I argue that the two types have different costs for foregoing fair trade policies and are distinguishable. For the central decision maker maximizing his tenure in power, the size of the relevant constituency for potential fair trade issues differs between the two types of states. The constituency and the cost of foregoing fair trade policies are larger in the sincere type, because demands for fair trade are based on broader societal concerns. I examine this argument in two empirical contexts---negotiations over international regulatory harmonization and settlement of trade disputes in international institutions. Sincere fair trade states are 1) less likely to pursue harmonization and more likely to 2) have a harder bargaining position in harmonization and 3) escalate to higher levels in dispute settlement. The finding rebuts the prevalent presumption that all fair trade policies are disguised protectionism. In addition to political science and economics, the research integrates sociology and philosophy (fairness and norms) and law (conflict of laws).

2009 - The Law and Society Association Words: 247 words || 
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2. Gilad, Sharon. "Talking about Fairness: The FSA’s Treating Customers’ Fairly Initiative" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Grand Hyatt, Denver, Colorado, May 25, 2009 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p303270_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Regulators are moving away from command and control regulation towards a variety of flexible forms of regulation, and greater reliance on individual firms and industries’ capacity for self-regulation. Among such flexible forms of regulation, Principles-Based-Regulation (PBR) has recently reached a prominent status, especially in the context of financial services. While the use of broad principles (in lieu of detailed rules) is not new, current PBR differs from its earlier manifestations in its further integration of performance-based and enforced self-regulatory features. Moreover, although the debates regarding the (dis-)advantages of using detailed rules vs. principles are familiar, empirical analyses of implementation of PBR are scarce.

This paper focuses on the UK Financial Services Authority’s shift towards greater reliance on principles in the regulation of retail finance, and in particular on principle 6 to the Financial Services and Market Act (2000) according to which ‘a firm must pay due regard to the interests of its customers and treat them fairly’. Since 2004, the interpretation, measurement and embedding of ‘Treating Customers Fairly’ (commonly referred to as ‘TCF’) have been the key focuses of the FSA’s regulation of the retail finance sector.

Informed by the assumptions of extant theoretical literature, the paper explores how TCF is interpreted by firms and the FSA, and the extent to which it results in flexibility and innovation. It further highlights the vulnerability of PBR in times of crisis. Methodology includes analysis of public and confidential documents and a convenience sample of interviews with industry participants.

2010 - ISPP 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 236 words || 
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3. Mentovich, Avital. and Tyler, Tom. "Fair or Equal? The Relations between Procedural Fairness and the Acceptance of Social Inequalities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting, Mark Hopkins Hotel, San Francisco, California, USA, Jul 07, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p420027_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Past research on outcomes disparities between social groups has shown inconsistent findings. On the one hand, favorable and distinct group-based outcomes are conceptualized to facilitate positive attitudes towards one’s group, and negative outcomes facilitate identity-threat, sense of ingroup deprivation and social unrest. However, the negative consequences of unfavorable ingroup outcomes cannot account for the prevalent acceptance of social inequality, specifically by members of disadvantaged groups. In the light of the central role of procedural fairness in enhancing the legitimacy of groups and authorities, we use procedural fairness to explore the conditions under which people would accept and endorse group-based inequality. First, we hypothesized that people prefer procedural fairness over favorable outcomes for their group. Second, we hypothesized that fair systems, unlike unfair systems, are viewed as more legitimate even by members of disadvantaged groups. Third, we hypothesized that the connection between procedural fairness and the endorsement of social inequalities is mediated by system justifying attitudes. Four studies examined the effects procedural fairness on the acceptance of social inequality. The results confirmed our hypothesis. As expected, participants preferred procedural fairness over the favorability of their group’s collective outcomes. Also, procedural fairness indeed elevated system justifying attitudes. These findings indicate that procedural fairness serves as a “gatekeeper” for collective outcome considerations, namely that people consider the favorability of collective outcomes only after procedural fairness has been established. Implications for society and for intergroup relations will be discussed.

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 15 pages || Words: 3757 words || 
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4. Blaeuer, Daniel. "Bodies at Work: Returning Sweat Labor to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT)." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p195313_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper explores questions of identity as they emerge within the contested terrain of the Fair Labor Standards Act. The authors follow the emergence the “worker” within the new economy and workforce. In the end, the authors look at labor practice and participatory management for suggestions on how we can reinterpret the field and practice of human resources and labor organizing.

2011 - BEA Words: 133 words || 
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5. Hall, Trevor. "Fair and Balanced: Implications of Hostile Media Perception in Light of a Fairness Doctrine Resurgence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Las Vegas Hilton, Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482428_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper/Presentation
Abstract: For decades the Fairness Doctrine was a staple of academic and political debate with respect to communications regulation.  The policy was an attempt to ensure equitable use of the spectrum for the public interest.  In the 1980's the policy was abolished by the FCC based on the conclusion it was not accomplishing its intended objectives.  Recent speculation has raised the possibility of a revival of the currently dormant regulatory policy.  During its existence, the Fairness Doctrine raised several constitutional and practical problems.  This paper suggests an additional problem: a renewed Fairness Doctrine would face the phenomena of the hostile media perception (HMP).  HMP occurs when viewers perceive media messages as biased against their own views, regardless of ideology or content.  HMP has significant implications for the viability of a reimplementation of the Fairness Doctrine.

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