Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 31 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7  - Next
2010 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 438 words || 
Info
1. Martinez, Katynka. "The Latino Mayberry and other Fairy Tales: (re)producing Latino subjectivities through CNN’s “Latino in America” series" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, San Antonio, TX, <Not Available>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p418085_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: Transnational media corporations often relegate Latino audiences to the margins. However in October 2009 CNN foregrounded Latinos by launching its “Latino In America” series. The four-hour program aired during prime time over two days and was rebroadcast for weeks that followed. Although the series focused on Latinos living in the United States it is unclear whether CNN was speaking directly to this community or purporting to represent them to those unfamiliar with Latino experiences and concerns. Trying to answer this question becomes even more difficult when one considers the type of Latino news coverage that is commonly found on CNN. Frank Sharry, executive director of America’s Voice, a national pro-immigration reform group, said: “The truth is that CNN already airs a nightly program on Latinos in America. It’s called ‘Lou Dobbs Tonight,’ and for 260 hours a year CNN provides air time for anti-immigrant distortions and anti-Latino propaganda.” While Latinos in America may seem like an antidote to Dobb’s xenophobic commentary and unsubstantiated claims regarding Latino criminality and disease, many viewers were critical of simplistic representations promoting a neoliberal agenda.

This study examines how one set of viewers (California Latino college students) made sense of the series against the context of their own experiences. Methodologically it draws from transcripts of in-class discussions at San Francisco State University. Additional interviews were identified by students through a snow-balling technique. Students watched the series and wrote response essays on representations of Latinidad on the program. Because most students in the class are from California, few were intimately familiar with the cities profiled on the series. The geographical and imagined distance created by the representations of Latinos in the series contributed to the production of ideological distance. Given their uniquely different and complex experiences as California Latinos, few of the students could relate to CNN’s idealistic, homogenizing, and safe narrative or even make sense of the series as “real” or “factual,” and many were quick to describe the series as a “fairy tale story.” When participants were asked about how they would choose to visually and narratively represent their California hometown, a majority wanted to address issues of immigration, journalistic fear mongering, and racial, sexual, and class stereotypes in television and film. These audiences wanted to see more nuanced and complicated discourses about themselves. My study concludes with the observation that Latinos are not passive and indiscriminant consumers of Latino-oriented cultural productions, but rather informed and critical publics. Examining how the intersection of differences such as geography, race, gender, class, and immigration history inform audience readings of the media, questions mainstream efforts to represent Latinidad through the safe commodification of non- threatening difference.

2011 - North American Association For Environmental Education Words: 40 words || 
Info
2. Lemiec, Gail. "FOREST FAIRIES AND SEA SERPENTS: CONNECTING IMAGINATION TO EDUCATION" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North American Association For Environmental Education, Convention Center, Raleigh, NC, Oct 12, 2011 <Not Available>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p497820_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Discussion
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This presentation will explore how imagination and education can work together to teach conservation messages. Join staff from the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores to discover ways to add imaginative elements to programs and investigate evaluation methods.

2011 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 11527 words || 
Info
3. Valocchi, Stephen. "Historiography, Gender Identity, and the Case of the Missing Fairies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Caesar's Palace, Las Vegas, NV, Aug 19, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p495426_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There is now a prodigious body of scholarship in the field of lesbian and gay social history that has been written over the past 30 years. This scholarship provides rich descriptions of a wide variety of landscapes of same-sex desire, practices, associations, organizations, and politics. This essay calls particular attention to one aspect of these diverse landscapes – the erotics of gender and the complexities of gender identification among homosexual men – and argues that, in many of these histories, this diversity is smoothed over or left behind in the narrative frame of ‘the making of a gay community’ defined on the basis of object choice. These histories “accomplish” this shift from gender identity to object choice by turning their analytical attention away from sexual subcultures where much of the gendered nature of sexual subjectivity resides to ‘gay communities’ that displace, police, or avoid gender to focus on the organizing for social change in the name of object choice. In the paper, I argue that many of these histories take what is happening in the culture – the dominance of the hetero/homo binary as the organizing principle of many social institutions – and impose it on the lived experience of men with same-sex desire. As a way to restore gender identity and the erotics of gender to the study of the history of sexuality, I propose the use of a queer-inflected ethnographic practice to interrogate the nature of sexual subjectivity, sexual subcultures and sexual communities.

2013 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 48 words || 
Info
4. McGregor, Janice. and Müller, Mareike. ""I want the fairy tale": Language learning, imagination, and desire in a study abroad context" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Sheraton Dallas, Dallas, Texas, Mar 16, 2013 <Not Available>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p626039_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper draws on two independent case studies that investigate the role that imaginations and desires play in the study abroad experiences of one American and one Bosnian-Canadian undergraduate student. The interplay between their imaginations and desires vis-à-vis learning, language use, and community participation is analyzed and discussed.

2012 - 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 726 words || 
Info
5. Feuerverger, Grace. "Fairy tales, and other stories as spiritual guides for children of war: An auto-ethnographic perspective on the “education revolution”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 56th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Apr 22, 2012 <Not Available>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p557162_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This presentation is an interpretive/narrative inquiry into the use of folk tales, fairy tales and other children’s books as pedagogical tools for children in classrooms in offering a way to make meaning out of their lives and a pathway toward agency, dignity and hope. This is especially the case for vulnerable children suffering from the trauma of war and other oppressions in local as well as in international contexts. In a school-based auto-ethnographic research study in Canada’s tow largest urban centres, Toronto and Montreal, we offer a notion of storytelling as a transformative process in order to create a more nuanced, more reflective pedagogical discourse of intercultural understanding and harmony for newly-arrived children coming from a variety language, cultural, racial and religious backgrounds. Stories, whether traditional fairy /folk tales or more contemporary books, not only help define children’s multiple identities and understandings of self and society, but also help to make personal meaning out of difficult --- and sometimes terribly unjust --- events in their young lives. They also allow others to look into, appreciate, and embrace the cultural worlds of the ‘other’ and open a road toward cultural literacy, increased imaginative skills, and a new empathy for the suffering of oneself and one’s fellow human beings (Greene, 1995; Nussbaum, 1997).


Perspectives

It is time, now more than ever, in our global society to focus on issues of diversity and difference within the pedagogical experience of teaching and learning as a borderland between passion and intellect, analysis and subjectivity, ethnography and autobiography, art and life (Behar, 1996). Behar also tells us that it is essential to “locate oneself in one’s own [ethnographic] text (ibid, p. 13).” Researching vulnerably takes as much skill, nuance, and willingness to follow through on all the ramifications of a complicated idea as does researching invulnerably and distantly. This is certainly the case in terms of allowing ourselves to teach vulnerably, or as Elliot Eisner calls it, “to teach on the edge of incompetence” (1993, p. 5). The theoretical underpinnings of this auto-ethnography are consonant with interpretivists such as Geertz (1988) and Denzin (1988) who offer an understanding of theory not as explanation or prediction but as interpretation or "the act of making sense out of a social interaction." Only in this way do we have an opportunity to create a soulful atmosphere where peaceful living and compassion as well as knowledge are valued in schools and classrooms in Canada and around the world.

Mode of Inquiry, Data Sources and Significance of the Study for International Education


The worldwide education revolution is a phenomenon that is closely embedded within the historical spaces of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries which have been inhabited, in unprecedented numbers, by those fleeing the brutality of war, poverty and famine. Their sense of rootlessness, as well as their struggle to find voice, meaning and balance in their new lives can be regarded as a metaphor for the (post)modern urban condition. In consonant with Britzman (1998) one’s own telling is fragmented and dominated by the "discourses of our time and place.” The researcher will share participants’ psychic state of in-betweeness, as “border dwellers”, which is in fact a way being shared by many individuals in this postmodern and post-colonial world which is riddled with diasporas emerging out of global migrancy and movement.


As an educator immersed in an auto-ethnographic research inquiry, I am summoned to, in Maxine Greene's (1988) words, "the tasks of knowledge and action". Perhaps one of the main qualities of this auto-ethnographic perspective is that of my own stance as a child of refugees and as a “border-crosser” which offers textual reflections on multiple identities, notions of selfhood, of authentic voice, of displacement, psychic orphanhood and exile.
This inquiry opens up a new ways of reflecting on teaching and learning in classrooms from the researcher’s own lived experience of searching for “home,” first as a young student in need of a safe place in the world and later as a teacher hoping to make a difference in the lives of her own elementary students coming from similar circumstances of war, poverty and other oppressions, and even later as a university professor sharing notions with her graduate students (most of whom are teachers in the field) of the power of literature to discuss issues of language, culture and identity in diverse educational contexts around the world.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7  - Next

©2018 All Academic, Inc.