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2011 - SCRA Biennial Meeting Words: 290 words || 
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1. Koenigs, Angela. and Ferrari, Joseph. "Mission-identity perceptions and faith maturity: Can a faith-based university's mission strengthen students' faiths?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SCRA Biennial Meeting, Roosevelt University/Harold Washington Library, Chicago, IL, Jun 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p497850_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Mission statements serve many important functions within institutions. For example, mission statements identify the overall purpose of the institution, indicate the plans the institution has for the future, and guide decision-making (Dominick, 1990; Gardiner, 1989). An institution’s identity is defined through its mission statement (Pearce & David, 1987). Institutional identity is the foundation on which an institutional value system is structured. At faith-based universities, the success of the institution at conveying its institutional identity and the extent to which students, staff, faculty, and administrators understand and embrace their university’s mission and values may have important implications for the moral and spiritual development of students and other stakeholders. The present study explores mission-identity perceptions as predictors of vertical and horizontal faith maturity among students at a faith-based university. Faith maturity reflects the extent a person exemplifies the priorities, commitments, and perspectives characteristic of a lively and developed faith (Benson Donahue, & Erickson, 1993). Prior research has suggested that a relationship between mission-identity perceptions at a faith-based university and faith maturity exists. For example, Rice and Gillespie (1992) found a relationship between the faith maturity of students and the perceived quality of the religious education program at the schools they attended. Participants were 304 undergraduates who responded to a survey concerning spirituality and institutional mission perceptions and were enrolled at a large, urban, faith-based university. Linear regressions were run with mission-identity perceptions, in terms of viewing the target university’s mission-identity as innovative and inclusive and religiously pluralistic, as predictors of vertical and horizontal faith maturity. Perceptions of the target university’s mission-identity as innovative and inclusive significantly predicted both vertical and horizontal faith maturity. However, perceptions of the target university’s mission-identity as religiously pluralistic did not significantly predict vertical or horizontal faith maturity.

2003 - American Political Science Association Pages: 32 pages || Words: 11252 words || 
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2. Shen, Francis. "Not Only Faith-Based But Faith-Centered, Too: A Reexamination of Dry Bones Rattling and Social Capital Readings of Faith-Based Organizations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p62273_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the past decade, an increasing number of scholars have reintroduced religion into the study of American politics. Included in this new wave of research is research focused on “social capital” in the United States. The social capital line of research has become interested in religion in part as it is manifest in the rise of Faith Based Organizations (FBOs). While increased scholarly interest in FBOs can serve to invigorate the discussions of how religious Americans shape politics and society, we must carefully note how religion is treated in these emerging social capital studies. What role do religion and Faith play in the social capital framework? What are religion and Faith credited with doing? When are religion and Faith no longer included in the analysis? This paper will attempt to address such questions by presenting a close-reading of Mark R. Warren’s Dry Bones Rattling.

The paper makes two central arguments. First, the paper argues that Warren places too much separation between the religious and the political, when in fact the political becomes religious for Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF) participants. Second, and building on this distinction between what constitutes the political and religious spheres, it will be argued that although Warren readily acknowledges the role of religion in the IAF, in the final analysis he writes Faith out of the picture.

The paper is organized into three sections. Section I provides an introduction to the issues at hand, attempting to address several prominent objections to the paper’s premise. Section II provides the bulk of the analysis, a detailed reading of Dry Bones Rattling text. Section II answers the question, “How exactly does Warren write about religion?” Section III presents a discussion of the implications of the findings in Section II, addressing the question, “Why does it matter that Warren treats religion in this way?”

Section II highlights three patterns of note. First, it will be argued that Warren consistently presents a story of social activism that is “based” in Faith, but eventually moves toward a more secular purpose. In one sense, this is the difference between a “Faith-based” vs. “Faith-centered” description of FBOs. Warren treats the idea of “Faith-based” as meaning primariliy that an FBO has its foundation and origin in Faith traditions. He does not give adequate attention to the notion that FBOs are also Faith-centered organizations – always and everywhere aware of God’s presence in their lives and work. Second, and related to the first point, the paper will argue that Warren repeatedly downplays or ignores comments from his research subjects that would point toward a more central role for Faith and God in the IAF’s story. Taking a close look at the way Warren treats these God-centered quotes reveals that although Warren is willing to put the quotes in front of the reader, he is not willing to dwell on the theological content the quotes contain. Third, the paper will suggest that Warren’s references to Sacred Scripture strip the Scriptures of much of what makes them unique to the Faith traditions from which they come.

In Section III, the paper will address three important implications of these three patterns in the text. First, because the IAF is not considered as a Faith-centered organization, a false dichotomy is created between the work of the IAF and the Christian Right. The theology of the IAF is not deeply probed, and the theology of the Christian Right remains unchallenged. Second, it will be argued that forcing the IAF into the social capital framework prevents the author from witnessing the whole IAF story. A brief comparison will be made between Warren’s work and Rogers (1990) Cold Anger. Third, the paper will conclude with a brief discussion of the public policy implications of Warren’s analysis.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 179 words || 
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3. Mukherjee, Sipra. "Islam in Other Faiths: Its Influence and Presence among the Minor Faiths of the Indian Subcontinent" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1194630_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Islam has had a somewhat diverse life in Bengal, an area that comprises Bangladesh and the province situated in east India. Distant from the mainstreams of Hinduism and Islam, the subcontinent’s religions, it has found expression in multifarious ways in a number of grass root faiths, often not explicitly associated with Islam. My paper will be on three of these minor faiths that live on in the remote rural areas of Bengal: Sahebdhani, Kartabhaja and Matua. It will attempt to explore how Islam has meshed with the other faiths present in rural Bengal to be accessible as a way of life, if not as a distinct religion.
Through this exploration, the paper will also attempt to enquire if, for a large section of the subcontinent’s population, the word religion needs to be understood differently. Not as ia word denoting deologies or faiths that stand distinct from each other, in binary opposition to the word ‘secular’, but as available philosophies which may be freely traversed across to arrive at a more fluid understanding of what it means to have faith.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 8717 words || 
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4. Hess, Amie. "Keeping the Faith? Examining Faith-Based Organizations as Quasi-State Agents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p22947_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Is faith stronger than bureaucracy? As part of larger transformations in the welfare state, Charitable Choice and other faith-based initiatives target increased participation by religious organizations. These shifts are based on the belief that faith-based organizations are somehow different from traditional social services providers, capable of avoiding the exigencies of bureaucracy. I conceptualize these legislative efforts as exogenous shocks intended to reorganize the social service delivery system. Using ethnographic data, I uncover multiple logics operating in the delivery of social services in one faith-based organization. The agency is guided by a set of bureaucratic imperatives that structure the formal organization, in this case dictating a move from intensive after-school programming to an in-school mini workshop format. However, in the implementation of programming, individual actors draw on multiple discursive strategies, including a technocratic logic and a logic of compassion. These findings suggest that faith-based organizations are not acting as spaces of personal transformation or providing social services in new ways based on institutionalized practices thought to inhere in religious organizations.

2008 - The Law and Society Association Words: 242 words || 
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5. Small, Mark. and McLeigh, Jill. "Defining the Role of "Faith" in Federal Faith-Based Initiatives" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Bonaventure, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 27, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p236877_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: As part of a Federal faith-based initiative, an Office of Violence Against Women pilot program funded three rural intermediary organizations to provide mini-grants to faith-based and community organizations. This paper describes an empirical study of the role that “faith” plays in the organizational structure and program administration of those organizations that received funding. Specifically, a pilot instrument survey was developed to measure the intensity of “faith” infused in an organization’s structure and function. The survey consisted of 14 multiple choice questions. Six of the questions addressed the organization’s structural characteristics, such as an organization’s mission statement, how it was founded and what affiliations it may have to external congregations or denominations. Four of the questions looked at an organization’s administrative practices, such as how board members are selected. The remaining four questions related to the actual activities and program(s) offered by the organization. The survey was administered to 49 individuals representing funded faith-based and community organizations. Ultimately, if Federal faith-based initiatives are to succeed, there must be some evidence that the role of “faith” is properly understood both by faith-infused organizations and their Federal overseers. Accordingly, this study represents one of the first efforts made to detail the role of “faith” plays in organizations receiving Federal funding under a faith-based initiative. The results are reviewed in light of other Federal definitions of "faith" and analyzed within the legal doctrines separating church and state.

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