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2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 7394 words || 
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1. Lauricella, Alexis., Alade, Fashina. and Wartella, Ellen. "Media and the Modern Family: The Influence of Family Structure on Enjoyment and Use of Family Media Activities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p982183_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Media dependency theory suggests that societal structure and social relationships have a major influence on media use. Recent data suggest that 30% of all households with children are single-parent households (U.S. Census, 2012), yet much of the existing research on families looks solely at two-parent families and rarely is media use studied as a function of family type. This study utilized a nationally representative survey of 2,326 parents of children 0 to 8 years old to understand the impact of family structure (widowed/never married, divorced/separated, or married/living together) on enjoyment of media and family media activities. Results indicate that single parent households use media with children differently than two-person households. Further, widowed/never married parents differ from divorced/separated parents in the amount of background TV use and their enjoyment of watching TV together with their children. These results are discussed with regard to the effects they may have on child development.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 5995 words || 
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2. Pedersen Stevens, Daphne., Minnotte, Krista Lynn., Kiger, Gary. and Mannon, Susan. "The Brighter Side of Work and Family Life: Family-Friendly Benefits and Positive Family-to-Work Spillover" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104081_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: We use role theory to direct our analysis of the association between family-friendly policies, family role quality, and positive spillover from family to the workplace. Taking data from 104 dual-earner couples with children, we find that a supportive workplace culture is both directly and indirectly associated with positive family-to-work spillover for men and women. Whereas family role quality and positive spillover are mainly associated with time factors for a wife’s job, workplace environment and pressure are important facets of a husband’s job. We also find that women’s experience of positive spillover is associated with her partner’s ability to take care of sick children when the need arises. These findings can be viewed through the lens of gender theory and may be representative of traditionally structured institutions and roles.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 33 pages || Words: 11489 words || 
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3. Day, Angela. "Family Currency: Family Business Daughters’ Business and Familial Contributions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p299363_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Since family business children play prominent roles in their family businesses it is important to explore the personal level tensions they experience. Using dialectical relationship theory, this paper explores how family business daughters experienced personal level relational contradictions. The contradiction of connection/separation is central to the experience of family business daughters. The localized version of the connection/separation tension shows up in the experiences of family business daughters, particularly as they grapple with their overlapping roles of “good worker” and “good daughter” and in the in concept of relational currency.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 6817 words || 
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4. Geva, Dorith. "From Family Breakup to Nuclear Family Governance: The four eras of US Familial Welfarism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p109219_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper argues that accounts of the welfare state as a form of labor market regulation fail to note the long history of the regulation of marriage and family life through US welfare policy. Feminist critiques of labor market approaches have implicitly accepted the emphasis upon welfare as a mechanism for labor market regulation. However, such a focus cannot explain current “pro-marriage” initiatives in the US. Accordingly, this paper traces the long history of the US regulation of family, so that we can better understand how precedent has led to contemporary regulation, and what is distinct about current welfare initiatives. By replacing the framework of “welfare as labor market regulation,” with the Foucauldian account offered by French sociologist Jacques Donzelot, I seek to explain why contemporary legislation is focusing upon the production of nuclear families and marriage. I argue that American welfare has regulated poor families for over a century, however, the definition of a “problem family,” along with state interventions offered, have shifted over time. Consequently, I suggest that the history of US familial welfarism can be conceptualized into four eras of family regulation; Family Breakup (1820-1890); Family Preservation (1890-1962); Nuclear Family Support (1962-1996); and Nuclear Family Governance (1996-present). Such an analysis also suggests a new relationship between poor families and the state in the context of contemporary neoliberal governance.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 5527 words || 
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5. Balsam, Monique. "Sibling Relationships in Nuclear Families, Divorced Families, and Remarried Families" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p22079_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Abstract
The remarried family (also known as blended, bi-nuclear, and reconstituted family) is projected to become the dominant family form in the United States by the year 2010. However, contemporary society provides few guidelines for organizing families in remarried kinship systems. Uncertainty about who is part of the new remarried family and who is not is characterized as the “unclear family”.
Scholars suggest that the high divorce rate in remarriages can be attributed to problems with sibling relationships in the remarried household. Yet with a few exceptions, there is a lack of research regarding sibling solidarity in remarried families.
Remarried families originally start as an intact or nuclear family. Siblings, who are now in blended sibling groups, at one time for a number of years, grew up in a traditional nuclear family constellation. Four middle range theories (attachment theory, family systems theory, rational choice, and evolutionary theory) and their applicability to sibling relationships in traditional nuclear families, divorced families and remarried families are examined. Lastly, the paper addresses current empirical research -drawing on solidarity concepts developed by Bengtson and Silverstein- where the focus is on solidarity within blended sibling groups (full siblings, half siblings and stepsiblings) in remarried families.

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