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Showing 1 through 5 of 6,543 records.
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2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 6817 words || 
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1. Geva, Dorith. "From Family Breakup to Nuclear Family Governance: The four eras of US Familial Welfarism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p109219_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper argues that accounts of the welfare state as a form of labor market regulation fail to note the long history of the regulation of marriage and family life through US welfare policy. Feminist critiques of labor market approaches have implicitly accepted the emphasis upon welfare as a mechanism for labor market regulation. However, such a focus cannot explain current “pro-marriage” initiatives in the US. Accordingly, this paper traces the long history of the US regulation of family, so that we can better understand how precedent has led to contemporary regulation, and what is distinct about current welfare initiatives. By replacing the framework of “welfare as labor market regulation,” with the Foucauldian account offered by French sociologist Jacques Donzelot, I seek to explain why contemporary legislation is focusing upon the production of nuclear families and marriage. I argue that American welfare has regulated poor families for over a century, however, the definition of a “problem family,” along with state interventions offered, have shifted over time. Consequently, I suggest that the history of US familial welfarism can be conceptualized into four eras of family regulation; Family Breakup (1820-1890); Family Preservation (1890-1962); Nuclear Family Support (1962-1996); and Nuclear Family Governance (1996-present). Such an analysis also suggests a new relationship between poor families and the state in the context of contemporary neoliberal governance.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 5527 words || 
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2. Balsam, Monique. "Sibling Relationships in Nuclear Families, Divorced Families, and Remarried Families" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p22079_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Abstract
The remarried family (also known as blended, bi-nuclear, and reconstituted family) is projected to become the dominant family form in the United States by the year 2010. However, contemporary society provides few guidelines for organizing families in remarried kinship systems. Uncertainty about who is part of the new remarried family and who is not is characterized as the “unclear family”.
Scholars suggest that the high divorce rate in remarriages can be attributed to problems with sibling relationships in the remarried household. Yet with a few exceptions, there is a lack of research regarding sibling solidarity in remarried families.
Remarried families originally start as an intact or nuclear family. Siblings, who are now in blended sibling groups, at one time for a number of years, grew up in a traditional nuclear family constellation. Four middle range theories (attachment theory, family systems theory, rational choice, and evolutionary theory) and their applicability to sibling relationships in traditional nuclear families, divorced families and remarried families are examined. Lastly, the paper addresses current empirical research -drawing on solidarity concepts developed by Bengtson and Silverstein- where the focus is on solidarity within blended sibling groups (full siblings, half siblings and stepsiblings) in remarried families.

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 21 pages || Words: 5128 words || 
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3. Lambert, Andrea. "Fluid Families: A Theoretical Model for Determining Family Membership within Blended and Ex-Blended Families" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p194597_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Using grounded theory, this study examined family membership development from the perspective of blended family members. Fifty participants experiencing at least one parental divorce were interviewed. The interviews resulted in the development of the Model of Fluid Families. In the model, properties of fluid dynamics (pressure, velocity, density, permeability, entropy, and time and space) were used to illustrate the various factors that contribute to feelings of family among blended and ex-blended family members.

2011 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 98 words || 
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4. Sawyer, Katina. "Discovering Heterosexual Bias in the Measurement of Work-Family Conflict: Can Work- Family Conflict Exist if the Family Doesn’t?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, SHERATON HOTEL (DOWNTOWN) ATLANTA, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p512650_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Work-family conflict is defined as: “a form of interrole conflict in which role pressures from work and family domains are incompatible in some respect” (Greenhaus & Beutell, 1985). However, the current measures used to examine the extent to which individuals experience work-family conflict are heteronormative, reinforcing silencing structures for LGBT families at work. Biased measurement tools limit the extent to which employees are able to report work-family conflict accurately and completely. Recognizing multiple, intersectional identities of family, as opposed to taking a unidimensional view, will allow researchers to discover more inclusive solutions for all families at work.

2013 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 174 words || 
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5. Foshee, Vangie. and McNaughton Reyes, Luz. "Lessons Learned from the Adaptation of Families for Safe Dates for Latino Families and for Families of Teens Exposed to Domestic Violence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-04-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p666729_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: To date, only one family-based program for preventing teen dating abuse has been evaluated. That program, Families for Safe Dates (FSD), was found to be effective in promoting caregiver engagement in dating abuse prevention, reducing several proximal risk factors for dating abuse, and preventing onset of physical dating abuse victimization. FSD is a theory-based primary prevention program that consists of a series of six booklets delivered to families via mail that contain information and interactive activities for caregivers and teens to complete together. This presentation describes the processes used to adapt FSD for use with two specific populations at increased risk for dating violence: Latino families and families of teens exposed to domestic violence, in preparation for conducting randomized trials of the two adapted programs. Results of formative research with caregivers and teens will be presented that detail the feedback obtained related to program content and structure as well as changes made to program delivery and evaluation study designs for the randomized trials. Discussion will center on lessons learned from the adaptation process.

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