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2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 7555 words || 
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1. Lather, Julie. and Moyer-Guse, Emily. "How Do We React When Our Favorite Shows and Favorite Characters Are Taken Away? An Examination of a Temporary Parasocial Breakup" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p300788_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines viewer’s reactions to a parasocial breakup situation. The television writers’ strike in 2007 caused many popular television shows to be taken off the air for a limited but substantial amount of time. Individuals who had their favorite TV character and/or favorite TV show taken off the air because of the strike were asked about their parasocial relationships (PSRs) with their favorite characters, their general TV affinity and about the distress that was caused by the loss of their favorite character/TV show. Results show that those with stronger PSRs with their favorite television characters report greater distress when that character is no longer available for viewing and that those with greater television affinity report more distress when their favorite TV show is no longer available. Instrumental viewing was also found to predict greater distress while ritualistic viewing was not a significant predictor of distress.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 47 pages || Words: 10993 words || 
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2. Chung, Sungeun., Waks, Leah., Meffert, Michael., Velazquez, Ana. and Waheed, Moniza. "When My Favorite Candidate Opposes My Favorite Position on an Issue: The Effect of Incongruent Messages on Attitude Change Toward the Issue and Toward the Source" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p233802_index.html>
Publication Type: Extended Abstract
Abstract: The present study analyzes the effect of persuasive communication both on attitudes toward the issue and attitudes toward the source, particularly in political communication context. Based on the cognitive dissonance theory and motivated information processing, it is expected that when responding to incongruent messages, voters with strong party identification show less attitude change toward the candidates but greater attitude change toward the issue than voters with weak party identification (H1); the stronger initial issue position, the less attitude change toward the issue, but the greater attitude change toward the candidates (H2); voters with strong party identification and strong initial issue position will show a greater variation for both attitudes toward the candidates and toward the issue (H4). To test hypotheses, incongruent information about gun control (Study 1) and abortion (Study 2) is presented based on party identification and initial issue position. Attitudes toward the candidates and attitude toward the issue are measured after message exposure. Data collection will be completed by November 6, 2007.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6172 words || 
Info
3. McCabe, Janice., Harvey, Amber. and Richburg, Kayla. "Where are the Children? Examining Primetime Network TV Shows and Viewers’ Favorite Shows, 1994-2009" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563269_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Media representations of specific groups, including their absence, impact people’s perceptions of these groups. We examine all primetime network televisions shows in 1994, 1999, 2004, and 2009 to determine whether children are present and in central roles. We compare overall trends in the presence and centrality of children to those in the most-watched shows reported by people and, specifically, tweens and teens. We find that the proportion of shows on air including children present dropped from 1994 to 2009 (from 69% to 52%). This decline over time was sharper for the most popular shows, although, in each year, tweens and teens’ favorite shows are more likely to include children than are American’s favorite shows. Shows with children in central roles also declined sharply from 1994 to 2009; in 1994 approximately three-quarters of favorite shows (whether of people, tweens, or teens) included at least one child in a central role; however, this declined to less than one-third of shows in 2009. Tweens’ most-watched shows saw the largest decline in the proportion with children in central roles (from 79% in 1994 to 5% in 2009). The only gender difference was a sharper decline for teen girls than boys; the proportion of girls’ favorite shows including children in a central role dropped 55 percent over the 15 year period while that for boys dropped 25 percent. Children are not only seeing fewer representations of themselves on primetime network television in 2009 than in 1994, they also are watching fewer shows that include children.

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