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2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 7959 words || 
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1. Dhingra, Pawan. "Forming Community Far from Fellow Immigrants" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p184738_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Most research on immigrant communities documents groups living among co-ethnics in major urban destinations, often in ethinc enclaves. How immigrants create community outside of those spaces remains overlooked. This paper focuses on Indian American motel owners in Ohio, in both urban and non-urban settings. These are middleman minorities. The paper demonstrates how these middleman minorities create a sense of community despite their racial and economic positions, as well as despite their location in Ohio, a state with little international migration. The implications of these findings for theories of immigrant adaptation are also discussed, namely the need to move beyond the common framing of immigrants of color as primarily either immigrants or minorities.

2008 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 292 words || 
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2. Velazquez, Mirelsie. "Bienvenidos Fellow Americans!: Revisiting Puerto Rican Migration to Chicago, 1940-1966" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency, Albuquerque, New Mexico, <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p245040_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: The migration and labor history of Puerto Ricans to Chicago speaks to the diverse experiences of Latinas/os across U.S. cities. This migration beginning in the 1940’s facilitated a labor need created by various factors, including the U.S.’ participation in military action abroad, the industrialization of the island of Puerto Rico, and also immigration limitations placed on other groups. Their unique status as U.S. citizens quickly differentiated them from other immigrant groups during this period, and initially affected the relationship between Puerto Ricans and the city of Chicago. In this paper I will discuss the ways in which Puerto Ricans were initially welcomed, discussed, and then racialized which came to aid the development of what Felix Padilla refers to as a “Puerto Rican consciousness”. As the numbers of Puerto Ricans in the city increased, the disenfranchisement felt by this community intensified, which in turn altered the way in which this group was viewed by the city of Chicago. During this time period, Puerto Rican students within city schools are also targeted by city officials, teachers, and the media as a way to facilitate the transition of Puerto Ricans into the American way of life. I will examine reports published and presented by both the Welfare Council of Chicago and the Mayor’s Committee on New Resident’s in the 1950’s and 1960’s, significantly affecting the ways in which Puerto Ricans established themselves within the city. With their reports both agencies contributed to a city wide awareness of this new group of migrants, educating wider social agencies on the perceived cultural differences inhabited by Puerto Ricans. Local media accounts from 1940 to 1966 will also aid in my discussion on this community of migrants initial relationship with the community in which they now came to inhabit.

2011 - AASHE Words: 241 words || 
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3. DeKnight, Brittany., Halfacre, Angela. and Kransteuber, Katherine. "Engaged Learning and Furman University’s Student Sustainability Fellows Program" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AASHE, D. L. Lawrence Convention Center, Pittsburgh, PA, Oct 09, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521449_index.html>
Publication Type: Briefing
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Engaged and place-based learning are innovative ways to educate students about sustainability. At the same time, a significant challenge for university sustainability programs is the limited amount of staff time for implementing and sustaining sustainability initiatives. With small offices and wide-ranging responsibilities on campus, there are always programs and opportunities that cannot be implemented due to staffing constraints. To provide additional support, as well as to provide valuable co-curricular experiences for students, institutions have created student intern and volunteer opportunities. This briefing will share the experiences of David E. Shi Center for Sustainability at Furman University, a 2650 student private liberal arts university in Greenville, South Carolina, in developing a successful and competitive Student Sustainability Fellows program over a three year time period. Furman’s approach features several key components: the development of grant and gift funding for student fellows; the creation of four separate fellows programs, with differing financial and time commitments; a focus on providing student experiences for research and service activities; recruitment of students from a wide variety of academic backgrounds; and connection with the broader campus and local community. The briefing will focus on the successes and challenges of the program to date, as well as sharing the lessons learned. Furman’s success in helping students of all majors to experience ways to study sustainability has been critical in gaining broader student support for sustainability initiatives and is a key component of the university’s success in advancing sustainability.

2015 - 17th Annual ILA Global Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Liu Wong, Maria. and George, Geomon. "Relevant and Responsive Urban Leadership Development: A Case Study of the Ministry Fellows Program" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 17th Annual ILA Global Conference, Centre Convencions Internacional Barcelona (CCIB), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, Oct 14, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1017617_index.html>
Publication Type: Display Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Facing increasingly complex challenges, urban ministry practitioners need accessible, affordable, and relevant theological training. This study examines the impact of a cohort-based, certificate level urban ministry leadership program emphasizing experiential learning in a diverse community. In a study of graduates from 2009-2014, lessons learned are presented for discussion.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 254 words || 
Info
5. Bracic, Ana. "Fellow Victim or Muslim Outsider? Serbian Reactions to the Refugee Crisis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1117085_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: When thousands of refugees passed through the Balkans in recent months, they encountered a population familiar with displacement. At the peak of conflict during the Yugoslav wars in the 1990s, Serbia housed about 600,000 refugees and internally displaced persons, mostly Serbs. Today, approximately 200,000 remain. I leverage the variation in personal experience of displacement and religiosity among Serbs (who tend to be Serbian Orthodox), and explore their levels of empathy and altruism towards the refugees, as well as their preferences on socio-political issues. On the one hand, previous experience of violence and displacement may help increase levels of empathy and altruistic behavior towards the refugees that are newly passing through. On the other hand, as most of the refugees passing through are Muslim or perceived as such, highly altruistic behavior might not extend to them. They are not only members of an out-group, but also likely targets of anti-Muslim sentiment that has persisted since the Yugoslav wars among some Serbs. I provide a nuanced test by capturing reactions to refugees who can be seen as fellow survivors or as members of a Muslim out-group. More specifically, I explore whether manipulating the salience of one identity (survivor of displacement) over another (not a Muslim) leads to different levels of empathy and altruistic behavior among Serbian participants. The project uses data from a survey experiment administered to a Serbian population and offers a perspective on the limits of altruistic behavior towards strangers with a shared experience of hardship.

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