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2018 - Northeastern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Jones, Michael. "Feminism’s Sons: FtMs, Epistemological Privilege, and the Development of a Trans-Positive Feminism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Canada, Nov 08, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1418619_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: FtMs (or transgender men) occupy an uncertain and often uncomfortable position within feminist theory and politics. Feminist responses to transmen are sometimes ambiguous and at others, hostile. Is it necessary that as FtMs journey toward their complex and, to varying degrees, masculine identities, they forfeit their feminist credentials? Is a trans-positive feminism possible and potentially more potent in the fight against the patriarchal gender binary? FtMs literally embody the disruption of sex/gender congruence. This paper presents an analysis of the reasons why FtMs have often been excluded from feminist communities and argues that based on common goals and shared oppressors, they have much to gain from the establishment of a trans-postive feminist theory and practice. The result of this collaboration could lead to an intersectional politics that is welcoming, robust, and ultimately successful.

2011 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 104 words || 
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2. Tobin, Erin. "Transforming the Faces of Feminism, Learning Feminism Through Film" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, SHERATON HOTEL (DOWNTOWN) ATLANTA, Atlanta, GA, Nov 10, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p513513_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Both feminist and non-feminist scholars continue to debate the current status of feminism, the effects of its achievements, and its current role in contemporary society. From Second Wave to Third Wave, Post-Wave to "Post-Feminist," the "faces of feminism" are as diverse as the definitions of the term. This poster examines how various contemporary filmmakers portray feminism and work to transform the image of feminism to appeal to their specific audiences. These films' different messages and representations of feminism strategically deploy certain feminisms that appeal to their audiences, and in turn transform the meaning of "feminist" and its role in contemporary culture.

2011 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 185 words || 
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3. Chakravarty, Debjani. "Indian Feminism, Feminisms in India and the Internet: New Media as New Agency?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, SHERATON HOTEL (DOWNTOWN) ATLANTA, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p512704_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: My paper examines how the internet is being increasingly mobilized as a site and space for feminist activism in India. While questions of access and technology integration remain when one considers internet usage in India it is still an exciting terrain, unbound by time and space manifesting contemporary Indian feminist intervention, or women’s activism (to represent those who “shun” feminism as an alien and/or inappropriate expression). Looking at three spaces, one that firmly proclaims an Indian feminist position (Ultraviolet), one that eschews feminism calling itself a “journal of women and society”- (Manushi, the oldest feminist journal in India, now fully online) and a third that publishes articles that embrace and denounce feminism -both nominally and essentially (Countercurrents), I analyze the nature of new media as a kind of queer, hybrid intersubjective space of mediation where the self (or selves) exist as textual body, taking on a virtual identity, becoming what Butler called “subjects of desire” emerging within discourses that do not always follow the rules of conventional epistemic production. Thus this space provides rich possibilities of performance of national and gender identities, justice and feminisms.

2016 - 87th SPSA Annual Conference Words: 321 words || 
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4. Ferguson, Michaele. "Cooptation or Complicity?  A Genealogy of the Rhetoric of “Women’s Empowerment” from Radical Third World Feminism to Neoliberal First World Feminism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 87th SPSA Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, <Not Available>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1094325_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The rhetoric of “women’s empowerment” is often invoked in global development policy discussions, and these days more often than not in the context of microfinance programs that aim to turn poor women into microentrepreneurs and debtors, fully integrated into a neoliberal economy.  Yet this usage of the phrase is relatively recent, and represents a shift from what it meant in development circles in the 1980s, when a group of Third World Marxist feminists first used this phrase to call for the poorest women to be integrated into policy-making and organized collectively to challenge neoliberal structural readjustment.  Many feminists have claimed that this rhetoric has been “coopted” by neoliberals, thereby denying any responsibility for its neoliberal usage.  I counter this view by offering a geneaology of the phrase “women’s empowerment” that traces its origins and development up to the present day.  The genealogy of the phrase resists the tendency in other scholarship to treat feminist and neoliberal rhetoric as separate and separable phenomena, and so shows the complicated interconnections between feminism and neoliberalism.  Feminists, I argue, have often been complicit in the neoliberalization of this rhetoric; this is not a simple story of cooptation.   It also reveals how neoliberal feminist rhetoric works to appeal simultaneously to people with competing ideological views, and in such a way as to foreclose critique, activism, and resistance.   Finally, I show that simply trying to define and use “women’s empowerment” for feminist purposes is insufficient as a technique of resistance, and doing so may insufficiently prepare feminist activists to resist neoliberal logics.  I draw inspiration from the Third World feminists who originally used this language to redirect feminist attention to collective action, structural critique, and a healthy skepticism of capitalism.  I conclude that effectively resisting neoliberal feminism requires owning feminist responsibility for its development as an ideology; when we own our responsibility, we can see our agency in both the rise and the overcoming of neoliberal feminism.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Mbunyuza-Memani, Lindani. "Resisting Feminisms: Africana Womanism Versus African Feminism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1105599_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: To communicate effectively and with power scholars ought to use appropriate and contextual concepts Yet, Black women’s lives have long been examined through a feminist lens. Feminism(s) is assumed to be universally applicable. This paper, drawing from an in-depth analysis of Africana womanism and African feminism challenges the universality of feminisms.
This analysis reveals that Africana womanists and African feminists acknowledge that predominantly, African women organize with men against racial oppression. Also, both concepts highlight the centrality of the ‘African’ culture and the important role of women as the nucleus of life. Contestation mainly centers on terminology. Africana womanism positions itself as an alternative to feminism while African feminism by using the feminism tag embraces some of its perspectives.
These concepts advocate for African inspired frameworks that challenge ‘western’ feminism and disrupt western theories.
This study contributes to womanhood studies that critically examine Black women’s experiences in the African diaspora.

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