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2006 - International Studies Association Pages: 15 pages || Words: 4471 words || 
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1. Armstrong, Patrick Mark. "Fighting the 'Right Way' and Fighting the 'Wrong Way': War-Fighting, Legitimacy and Hegemony" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p100110_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper looks at how norms of appropriate behavior in warfare are determined. The principle question driving the paper is why some modes of warfare are acceptable and why others are deemed inappropriate. In particular it looks at some of the normative restrictions on warfare and how these have been interpreted. The paper argues that global hegemons are able to establish codes of conduct for the practice of war that legitimize certain actions and means of fighting and delegitimize others. These norms can be interpreted to reinforce the specific strengths of the hegemon at the expense of potential challengers. The paper will look at how these codes of conduct are determined and why some specific rules of war are generally accepted in the international community and others are not by focusing on recent practices by the United States. The discussion will focus on both the actions and language employed by the United States and will attempt to relate these to the issues relating to technological advantages emjoyed by the United States. Some of this will be specifically relevant to the current 'Global War on Terror', but the focus of the paper seeks to move beyond this to determine how great powers and significant global actors have been able to decide what is the 'right way' and what is the 'wrong way' to fight a war.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Words: 38 words || 
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2. Weitsman, Patricia. "United We Fight: The Norm of Togetherness in American War Fighting Strategy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p414288_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since the landmark Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986, jointness has been at the core of strategic military thinking. The commitment to coordinating the different branches of the U.S. Armed Forces spilled over into arena of

2016 - 87th SPSA Annual Conference Words: 140 words || 
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3. Jones, Cara. "Fighting the Good Fight, Losing the War: interviewing in times of crisis" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 87th SPSA Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1072980_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper explores the methodological, ethical, political and social issues associated with conducting elite interviews with both government and opposition figures during the time of major political upheaval. The summer of 2015 saw dozens of deaths, hundreds of arrests and injuries, and the plummeting of Burundi's economy. How can one collect data in a meaningful way, given these circumstances, without placing subjects or themselves in harm's way? How adaptable are research methods and structures on "the brink of war", where credible data might be needed most? Finally, how does one address global concerns about data collection and the likelihood of project completion in the midst of this turmoil? Using Burundi as an exploratory case, I attempt to provide some preliminary answers to these questions, and further contribute to the body of work on methods, research ethics, and civil war scholarship.

2017 - ASEH Annual Conference Words: 224 words || 
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4. Harris, James. "Fighting War, Fighting Flu: The British Battle with Pandemic Influenza during and after the First World War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1169798_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: As the First World War was coming to its end a new environmental crisis was just beginning. The onset of pandemic influenza, which first struck in March 1918 at Fort Riley in Kansas, would have far greater lethality than the war itself. While the history of influenza in the aftermath of the Great War is well established, this paper examines the history of influenza during the last months of the Great War (flu mortality peaked in October 1918--one month before the war’s end) in order to examine the role of disease and war in the making of the interwar environment. While pandemic influenza was a global environmental crisis from 1918-1920, this paper focuses on the effects of pandemic influenza on the late-wartime experience in Britain. By considering how environmental forces (in this case a disease) shaped the last months of the war both on the fields of battle and on the British home front, this allows us to consider the proximate impacts of a global health crisis, as well as the interconnections of the histories of war and the environment. This paper will also examine how British efforts to combat the influenza pandemic played a major role in shaping interwar British public health efforts by examining how the pandemic forced concerns about high-impact infectious disease back into the center of British public health concerns.

2006 - International Studies Association Words: 174 words || 
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5. Gupta, Devashree. "Fighting to Lead the Fight: Explaining Factional Rivalry in Nationalist and Ethnic Movements" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p99525_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Nationalist and ethnic movements are rarely, if ever, homogenous entities. Though movement participants may share common aspirations for greater rights and recognition from the central state, internally they are frequently divided into competing factions that disagree over which aspirations should take precedence and how those aspirations should be realized. In this paper, I examine these intra-movement disputes and explore the mechanisms through which certain movement factions are more successful in promoting their particular preferences for movement strategy and ultimately, how such factions are able to acquire power and influence within the movement as a whole. I argue that certain environmental conditions, including the type of regime, the structure of political opportunities, and the presence or absence of allies can impact the relative balance of power of movement factions. Moreover, these external conditions interact dynamically with the strategic choices of factional leaders on issues of organizational structure, issue framing, and tactics. I test these various relationships using a combination of case studies and quantitative data from an original dataset of movements from 25 different countries.

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