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2014 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7871 words || 
Info
1. Eisen, Daniel. and Laxson, Kaeli. "From Ethnic Shame to Filipino Role Model: Ethnic Identity Development After Asserting a Filipino Identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p708001_index.html>
Publication Type: Formal research paper presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although a colonial mentality is prevalent among Filipinos across the world, it is especially strong among Filipinos in Hawaii. The long colonial history and degradation of the Filipino culture in the Philippines is further strengthened by Hawaii’s plantation history, which created a social structure that continues to marginalize Filipinos. The marginalization of Filipinos is further supported by the structural concentration of Filipinos in the service sector and the privileging of a local identity, which leads many Filipinos to distance themselves from their Filipino ethnic heritage. This process of distancing oneself from their ethnic heritage, leads many individuals to know very little about Filipino culture. Although the participants in this study grew up ashamed of being Filipino, they achieved high levels of academic achievement and broke the stereotype about Filipinos being uneducated service workers. A grounded theory analysis of semi-structured interviews with 25 Filipinos in Hawaii allowed for an examination of the complexities of identity construction for these individuals, who had not explored, committed, or developed positive affect about being Filipino when they began asserting a Filipino identity. This research suggests that although these individuals are viewed as role models and begin asserting a Filipino identity, they processes they engage in to develop positive affect about being Filipino may reinforce stereotypes about Filipinos and, ultimately contribute to the continued marginalization of Filipinos in Hawaii.

2016 - The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 155 words || 
Info
2. Anicete, Raymond Charles. "The Relationship of Filipino Muslims with their Filipino Christian Fellow-Community in Batangas City, Philippines" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1085980_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In today’s context of several conflicts among different faith groups, it became necessary to understand the nature of successful interactions among groups. The current research utilized theories regarding the interaction of different faith groups. It concentrated on the nature of interactions among Muslim migrants with their Christian neighbors in the Batangas City, Philippines. Three in-depth interviews were utilized in the study, wherein 4 Muslim respondents were purposively interviewed. To build rapport, the author first conducted participant observation and pakikipag-kuwentuhan with members of the Muslim community. The research design followed an ethnographic-like style, where methods were used in order to understand the nature of the interactions and the context of the Muslim community. Seven categories emerged, social identity, reasons of interactions of the Muslims, kinds of interactions, acts that strengthen interactions and relationships, obstacles in interactions, and conflict resolution strategies. The author was able to construct an initial interaction model.

2013 - Ninth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 145 words || 
Info
3. Ignacio, Emily. "Marketing the Philippines as "Home": Solidifying Filipino Identity and Economic Security through The Filipino Channel" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Ninth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 15, 2013 <Not Available>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p645080_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Fifteen years ago, online researchers largely engaged in a debate as to whether social groups on the internet and Web could even be defined as “communities.” Since then, we have accepted that real communities form on the internet, and this and other new technologies have been used by members of various diasporas to keep in touch with their family members, keep abreast of policies back “home,” and, generally to foster a sense of solidarity and create a “home” among all participants. Analyzing two common storylines in both news shows and programming on The Filipino Channel (TFC) from a cultural studies, post-colonial lens reveals which reveal a much larger, meta-thread: that of the neocolonial relationship between the United States of America, the Filipino diaspora, and the usefulness of TFC for Filipinos and the corporations (especially those that have its origins in the USA) that hire them.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 7848 words || 
Info
4. Eisen, Daniel. "From Ethnic Shame to Filipino Role Model: Ethnic Identity Development After Asserting a Filipino Identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 09, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p650355_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although a colonial mentality is prevalent among Filipinos across the world, it is especially strong among Filipinos in Hawaii. The long colonial history and degradation of the Filipino culture in the Philippines is further strengthened by Hawaii’s plantation history, which created a social structure that continues to marginalize Filipinos. The marginalization of Filipinos is further supported by the structural concentration of Filipinos in the service sector and the privileging of a local identity, which leads many Filipinos to distance themselves from their Filipino ethnic heritage. This process of distancing oneself from their ethnic heritage, leads many individuals to know very little about Filipino culture. Although the participants in this study grew up ashamed of being Filipino, they achieved high levels of academic achievement and broke the stereotype about Filipinos being uneducated service workers. A grounded theory analysis of semi-structured interviews with 25 Filipinos in Hawaii allowed for an examination of the complexities of identity construction for these individuals, who had not explored, committed, or developed positive affect about being Filipino when they began asserting a Filipino identity. This research suggests that although these individuals are viewed as role model and begin asserting a Filipino identity, they processes they engage in to develop positive affect about being Filipino may reinforce stereotypes about Filipinos and, ultimately contribute to the continued marginalization of Filipinos in Hawaii.

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