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2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Kim, Molly. "South Korean Hostess Film and Film Censorship During Park Chung Hee's Military Regime (1960-1979)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1105697_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Park Chung Hee’s military regime (1960-1979) is notorious for state-operated censorship which exerted unprecedented power over film studios and directors. The military government purportedly used film censorship to distract the public from political consciousness by controlling political materials in films while condoning censorship control on sexual content. As a result, the production of soft-core adult films soared and became popular among Korean audiences. One of such films that thrived during this period, so called, Hostess Film (prostitute films) is worthy of attention because this strand of films is characterized not only for the exploitive employment of female sexuality but more importantly for the filmic representation of poverty, rape, and other lower-class issues which the state censorship board particularly sought to regulate.
In viewing such dynamics between state censorship and film, the following questions are inevitable: how was it possible that the state was willing to turn a blind eye on the explicit sexualization of women in hostess films when film censorship was at its peak? Why were the social and political aspects of this group of films about female sexual workers not seriously considered socially relevant by the government at a time when censorship was so high?
This articlw aims to unravel the above issues by scrutinizing the interplay between Park’s state censorship and hostess films using censorship records and notes. Furthermore, it offers an analysis of a hostess film, The Rose that Swallowed Thorn (Cheong, 1979) as a case study to show how this film strategically orchestrates visual and thematic elements to circumvent state censorship enforcement.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 54 pages || Words: 21671 words || 
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2. Furia, Stacie. and Bielby, Denise. "Bomb Shells on Film Reels: Women, Military Films, and the Enactment of Hegemonic Gender Ideologies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p96588_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Our research explores how the military’s institutional ambivalence toward women in its ranks is reflected in Hollywood’s hegemonic representations of gender in films about the armed services. As cultural products, films are social constructions that embody cultural beliefs, values, idioms, and stereotypes. Film production itself is mediated by institutional processes, many of which are, themselves, gendered. Our sample is comprised of films with narratives about the U.S. military that were produced and distributed by the Hollywood studios and production companies between 1932 and 2002. Our analysis, which focuses on the ways in which the composition of scenes, frames, and action depict gender, reveals in more nuanced and complex ways how the portrayal of military women is filmically constructed. Military films take for granted ideas of hetero-normative masculinity thus conflating masculinity with being male and consequently ignoring differences between men. Military films also construct women by their difference and as individuals rather than part of a team; consequently, women have little chance of acceptance within the military because of the group structure it maintains. While feminist scholars would argue that masculinity and femininity are equally important for understanding both women and men, military films reject the possibility of any single person existing within multiple gender categories. By presenting the dichotomy of two and only two genders, which exist in opposition to one another, military movies reinforce hegemony and frustrate viewers’ ability to come to a better understanding of the multitude of human gender experiences.

2010 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 10906 words || 
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3. Krämer, Nicole. and Witschel, Thomas. "Demystifying the Sad Film Paradox: A Critical Analysis of the Question of Why People Enjoy the Reception of Sad Films" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 22, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p404615_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One of the most interesting phenomena in the study of film-induced emotions is the sad film paradox. Although various approaches have been put forward to explain the fact that people watch movies that make them cry and supposedly feel sad, none has been deemed satisfactory. Recently, however, new ideas have been presented that are stimulating progress with respect to theories and models. Against this background, the goal of the present paper is to critically reflect the state-of-the-art with regard to the sad film paradox and to advance theory development. Based on an overview of current theoretical models on the nature of media-induced emotions and on classical and innovative approaches with respect to the sad film paradox, ideas for theoretical integrations are presented. Moreover, based on a consideration of the actual content of sad films, two strands for new explanations are derived.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Words: 139 words || 
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4. Burton, Aaron. "The Portrayal of Christ through Film History: A Rhetorical Analysis of Significant Christ Films" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p258221_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: The purpose of this investigation is to discuss American Christ Films and how the promotional strategies and cultural restraints have influenced the portrayal of Jesus. The study seeks to understand each film in the particular period that it was produced. These films have become part of the rhetorical dialogue and add to the discussion of Christianity. Six films have been selected for analyses that represent both the successes and failures of the Christ Film genre. The films selected are From the Manger to the Cross (1912), The King of Kings (1927), The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965), Jesus Christ Superstar (1973), The Last Temptation of Christ (1988), and The Passion of The Christ (2004). Using rhetorical analysis and history data, this investigation attempts to understand the ways that films about Jesus aid in spreading the message of the Gospels.

2014 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 150 words || 
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5. Mandt, Christina. "Film in Autumn: The Episode Film Germany in Autumn Read as Baroque Emblem" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, New York, NY, Hilton New York, <Not Available>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p677295_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: With the omnibus film Germany in Autumn, a generation of auteur filmmakers reacts collectively to the climax and end of RAF terrorism in West Germany, as well as to an aesthetic crisis in German cinema. The paper will read the film through emblematic practice: its text-image relations translate the traditional simultaneity of inscriptio, pictura, and subscriptio into the linear temporal structure of film. While the collage of heterogeneous scenes embraces moral ambivalence, titles at the beginning and end add a superior moral perspective to the events and turn the antithetic material into an audiovisual argument. The cinematic emblem Germany in Autumn thereby opposes the dogma of political reasoning in German terrorism discourse as an alternative form of contemplation; the film poses ethical questions about human dignity and establishes allegorical images in public discourse as well as in the collective memory of those events referred to as German Autumn ever since.

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