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2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 11 pages || Words: 4680 words || 
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1. Verdaasdonk, Dorotheee. "Film Festivals and Awards as a marketing tool for film exploitation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p20396_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Do films that have been shown at the three major film festivals in Europe or have won a major award a better chance at the box office? This research covers the performance of films over three years in The Netherlands.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Kim, Molly. "South Korean Hostess Film and Film Censorship During the Military Regime (1960-1979)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1105703_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Park Chung Hee’s military regime (1960-1979) is notorious for state-operated censorship which exerted unprecedented power over film studios and directors. The military government purportedly used film censorship to distract the public from political consciousness by controlling political materials in films while condoning censorship control on sexual content. As a result, the production of soft-core adult films soared and became popular among Korean audiences. One of such films that thrived during this period, so called, Hostess Film (prostitute films) is worthy of attention because this strand of films is characterized not only for the exploitive employment of female sexuality but more importantly for the filmic representation of poverty, rape, and other lower-class issues which the state censorship board particularly sought to regulate.
In viewing such dynamics between state censorship and film, the following questions are inevitable: how was it possible that the state was willing to turn a blind eye on the explicit sexualization of women in hostess films when film censorship was at its peak? Why were the social and political aspects of this group of films about female sexual workers not seriously considered socially relevant by the government at a time when censorship was so high?
This articlw aims to unravel the above issues by scrutinizing the interplay between Park’s state censorship and hostess films using censorship records and notes. Furthermore, it offers an analysis of a hostess film, The Rose that Swallowed Thorn (Cheong, 1979) as a case study to show how this film strategically orchestrates visual and thematic elements to circumvent state censorship enforcement.

2016 - AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto Words: 248 words || 
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3. Nakajima, Seio. "Official Chinese Film Festivals and Film Awards: History, Configuration, and Legitimation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, <Not Available>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1103871_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: With the rise of interest and popularity in Chinese cinema, seminal studies of Chinese film festivals havebegun to appear. However, most, if not all, of the existing studies focus on independently organized film festivals, in which films made outside of the government-approved film industrial system are screened and evaluated. This paper shifts the focus by zeroing in not on the independent film festivals but on government-sponsored, “official” Chinese domestic film festivals, including the Shanghai International Film Festival, Changchun Film Festival, and Beijing International Film Festival, as well as government-approved Chinese domestic film awards such as the Golden Rooster Awards, Huabiao Awards, and Hundred Flowers Awards. This project is an exploratory study, and hence I will focus on answering three descriptive research questions as follows: 1) How and when did the festivals and awards come into existence? 2) What is the configuration (i.e., numbers and types) of the official film festivals and awards in China? 3) What are the organizational and institutional bases of the film festivals and awards (who sponsors, who organizes, who gives money, etc.), as well as different criteria of legitimation (e.g., Hundred Flowers Awards for popularity, Golden Rooster Awards for professional legitimation [film critics, filmmakers, film historians, etc.], and Huabiao Awards for political legitimation by the government)? Contra the widely shared image of official Chinese film festivals as cites of political correctness, I attempt to show the dynamism and multiplicity of logics—at times even contradictory—within the world of official Chinese film festivals and awards.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 54 pages || Words: 21671 words || 
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4. Furia, Stacie. and Bielby, Denise. "Bomb Shells on Film Reels: Women, Military Films, and the Enactment of Hegemonic Gender Ideologies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p96588_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Our research explores how the military’s institutional ambivalence toward women in its ranks is reflected in Hollywood’s hegemonic representations of gender in films about the armed services. As cultural products, films are social constructions that embody cultural beliefs, values, idioms, and stereotypes. Film production itself is mediated by institutional processes, many of which are, themselves, gendered. Our sample is comprised of films with narratives about the U.S. military that were produced and distributed by the Hollywood studios and production companies between 1932 and 2002. Our analysis, which focuses on the ways in which the composition of scenes, frames, and action depict gender, reveals in more nuanced and complex ways how the portrayal of military women is filmically constructed. Military films take for granted ideas of hetero-normative masculinity thus conflating masculinity with being male and consequently ignoring differences between men. Military films also construct women by their difference and as individuals rather than part of a team; consequently, women have little chance of acceptance within the military because of the group structure it maintains. While feminist scholars would argue that masculinity and femininity are equally important for understanding both women and men, military films reject the possibility of any single person existing within multiple gender categories. By presenting the dichotomy of two and only two genders, which exist in opposition to one another, military movies reinforce hegemony and frustrate viewers’ ability to come to a better understanding of the multitude of human gender experiences.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 7374 words || 
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5. Wong, Cindy. "Producing Film Knowledge, Producing Films: Festivals in a New World" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p233992_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: For decades, film festivals have provided sites for creation and exchange of film knowledge through screenings, discussion and other interpersonal exchanges. This has been especially evident in the power relations of European nations and wider national industries and films of the global South. In the last twenty years, many festivals have also taken more active roles in production through arrangements of co-production and funding, again allowing European festivals to promote films from specific areas, groups or figures of the developing world.
This paper draws on interviews, film analysis and festival structures to explore this important ongoing change, its functions and impact from Rotterdam, Berlin and Locarno to Pusan and Hong Kong. This analysis also allows us to understand the implications of this changing role for global power, within the world of film as well as across other global parameters.

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