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2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Words: 222 words || 
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1. Loist, Skadi. "Assessing Film Circulation Patterns on the Film Festival Circuit" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, <Not Available>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1233279_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Film festivals have long been central to the circulation of taste. Their competitions bestow prestige, curate new waves, create auteurs and define what will circulate as global arthouse film. Festival awards do not only carry symbolic capital and impact global film circulation in terms of taste, but they also have direct impact on the circulation in terms of the further festival run and traditional distribution (Mezias et al. 2011). With the growth and professionalization of the festival circuit since the 1980s its significance as part of the film sector has grown and has become part of an alternative circulation system beyond traditional distribution. Based on data gathered for films that screened at the Teddy Award of the Berlin International Film Festival this paper will take a closer look at which factors (such as a film’s budget, genre, premiere status, awards) have an impact on the circulation pattern of a film as it moves through the festival circuit and to traditional distribution.
Skadi Loist is a postdoctoral researcher and lecturer at the Institute for Media Research at the University of Rostock, Germany. She is co-founder of the Film Festival Research Network (FFRN). Her most recent publication is Film Festivals: History, Theory, Method, Practice (Routledge 2016, coedited with M. de Valck and Brendan Kredell). Contact: skadi.loist@uni-rostock.de; Universität Rostock, August-Bebel-Str. 28, 18055 Rostock, Germany.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Kim, Molly. "South Korean Hostess Film and Film Censorship During Park Chung Hee's Military Regime (1960-1979)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1105697_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Park Chung Hee’s military regime (1960-1979) is notorious for state-operated censorship which exerted unprecedented power over film studios and directors. The military government purportedly used film censorship to distract the public from political consciousness by controlling political materials in films while condoning censorship control on sexual content. As a result, the production of soft-core adult films soared and became popular among Korean audiences. One of such films that thrived during this period, so called, Hostess Film (prostitute films) is worthy of attention because this strand of films is characterized not only for the exploitive employment of female sexuality but more importantly for the filmic representation of poverty, rape, and other lower-class issues which the state censorship board particularly sought to regulate.
In viewing such dynamics between state censorship and film, the following questions are inevitable: how was it possible that the state was willing to turn a blind eye on the explicit sexualization of women in hostess films when film censorship was at its peak? Why were the social and political aspects of this group of films about female sexual workers not seriously considered socially relevant by the government at a time when censorship was so high?
This articlw aims to unravel the above issues by scrutinizing the interplay between Park’s state censorship and hostess films using censorship records and notes. Furthermore, it offers an analysis of a hostess film, The Rose that Swallowed Thorn (Cheong, 1979) as a case study to show how this film strategically orchestrates visual and thematic elements to circumvent state censorship enforcement.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Kim, Molly. "South Korean Hostess Film and Film Censorship During the Military Regime (1960-1979)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1105703_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Park Chung Hee’s military regime (1960-1979) is notorious for state-operated censorship which exerted unprecedented power over film studios and directors. The military government purportedly used film censorship to distract the public from political consciousness by controlling political materials in films while condoning censorship control on sexual content. As a result, the production of soft-core adult films soared and became popular among Korean audiences. One of such films that thrived during this period, so called, Hostess Film (prostitute films) is worthy of attention because this strand of films is characterized not only for the exploitive employment of female sexuality but more importantly for the filmic representation of poverty, rape, and other lower-class issues which the state censorship board particularly sought to regulate.
In viewing such dynamics between state censorship and film, the following questions are inevitable: how was it possible that the state was willing to turn a blind eye on the explicit sexualization of women in hostess films when film censorship was at its peak? Why were the social and political aspects of this group of films about female sexual workers not seriously considered socially relevant by the government at a time when censorship was so high?
This articlw aims to unravel the above issues by scrutinizing the interplay between Park’s state censorship and hostess films using censorship records and notes. Furthermore, it offers an analysis of a hostess film, The Rose that Swallowed Thorn (Cheong, 1979) as a case study to show how this film strategically orchestrates visual and thematic elements to circumvent state censorship enforcement.

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