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2005 - American Association For Public Opinion Association Words: 260 words || 
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1. Landreth, Ashley. and Hunter, Jennifer. "First-level interactions and final outcomes: Adding value to behavior coding" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association For Public Opinion Association, Fontainebleau Resort, Miami Beach, FL, <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p17135_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper/Poster Proposal
Abstract: Behavior coding methodology employs a systematic analysis of verbal interactions between an interviewer and a respondent. Its purpose is to identify overt problems by quantifying the interviewer/respondent behaviors that connote difficulties in both asking and answering survey questions. Typically this is accomplished by limiting the analysis to the “first-level” of interviewer/respondent interaction, because major problems present themselves when the question is first asked and as respondents initially react or respond. While first-level coding is necessary for detecting flawed questions, it does not provide information about the final response “outcome” when respondents at first fail to produce an answer that meets the measurement objective. Flawed questions with response problems that cannot be overcome through interviewer/respondent negotiation may suffer from fundamentally different issues than flawed questions that are eventually resolved. Coding the final response outcome may provide more robust analysis of question performance, without creating undue burden for coders.

In this research, in addition to analyzing the first-level interaction, we also coded and analyzed the final response outcome with regard to questions’ measurement objectives. The outcome was coded using a basic framework of behavioral codes applied to audiotaped face-to-face interviews that collected demographic data as part of the nonresponse follow-up to the 2004 Test Census. This research explores the advantages of coding this aspect of the interviewer/respondent interaction; it provides additional information about the response process, data quality, and potential approaches to fixing question problems. In addition, we will discuss whether the additional data generated justify the extra effort on behalf of coders.

2006 - American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Words: 242 words || 
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2. Meeker, Elena. "Evaluation of a Pharm.D. Curriculum Using a Survey of Preceptors of Final Year Rotations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, San Diego, California, USA, Jul 05, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p118607_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Objectives: The University of Washington School of Pharmacy (UWSOP) is currently evaluating its existing Pharm.D. curriculum. The goal is to produce a generalist pharmacy practitioner capable of practicing in multiple patient care environments. In order to determine strengths and weaknesses of the curriculum in meeting this goal, preceptors of final year rotations were asked to evaluate their students with respect to several key traits of effective generalist practitioners. These traits were defined according to the five competencies described as essential for all health care providers in the 2003 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report entitled “Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality”. Methods: An anonymous, voluntary online survey of preceptors at the 49 most active UWSOP sites in 2004-2005 was conducted. Among other things, questions asked preceptors to rate how well students met the IOM core competencies. Permission to conduct the survey was obtained from the University of Washington Human Subjects Review Division. Results: Results are still being analyzed at present. Implications: The survey results are expected to provide insight into whether the UWSOP curriculum effectively assists students in acquiring the five IOM competencies and, thus, succeeds in preparing them to become skilled generalist practitioners. Results will be compiled and presented to the UWSOP Curricular Review and Planning Committee with the aim of informing the School of preceptor perceptions of progress toward demonstration of the IOM core competencies and focusing the Committee’s efforts on the areas most in need of review or revision.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 6522 words || 
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3. Shearman, Sachiyo. and Dumlao, Rebecca. "Who Gets the Final Words?: An Analysis of Young Adults’ Recall of a Major Conflict With Their Parents" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p169832_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: 208 undergraduate participants were asked to recall and detail a major conflict they had experienced with their parents. The conflict episodes reported were coded based on 1) topical content of a conflict, 2) conflict strategy used by parents, 3) conflict strategy used by the young adults, 4) outcome of the conflict, and 5) reported consequences of the conflict to them or to their relationship. 4 general categories for topical conflicts were identified: life and educational decision, social and socializing behavior, moral or appropriate code of conducts, and parent’s behavior. The most frequently reported strategy selected by parents was distributive one, while the young adults’ most common choice was the avoidance strategy. Interestingly, the outcome of the conflict was a preferable to the parents in the current data set. In other words, parents are getting the final words. Lastly, although the many participants reported that the conflict experience was inconsequential, nearly half reported that it had a positive impact to them or their relationship with their parents.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 324 words || 
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4. Hagan, Joe. "Coalitions at the Brink: Fragmented Crisis Decision Making and the Final Step in the Domestic Road to War, the July 1914 Case" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p178688_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Drawing upon on a larger project on domestic oppositions in the Great Powers since 1815, this paper will examine the politics of decision making in each of the key powers involved in the July 1914 crisis. As a contribution to the panel 's focus on parliamentary systems and foreign policy, it will offer several insights based on cross-national historical evidence on the immediate causes of WWI. First, even though authority typically becomes exceptionally concentrated in crisis situations, decision making does not necessarily become politically more cohesive and, in fact, may become more fragmented and polarized. In July 1914, with the exception of Russia, coalition decision units (perceived or real) were surprisingly pervasive across all Great Power governments. Second, the dynamics of coalition decision making at the brink of war represent, in effect, a separate (in fact, third) stage in a longer term domestic road to war involving the prior rise of political opposition and leaders' subsequent attempts to cope with internal crises. Yet, the operation of coalitions at the peak of pre-war crises is not simply a direct culmination of such prior political patterns; rather, as illustrated by the pre-WWI case, they take on new, unanticipated dynamics and thus represent a distinct step in the domestic road to war. Third, these complex coalition dynamics ultimately confound the strategic interaction of contending powers. In July 1914, the original crisis calculations of the key leaders were dramatically undercut by the intensification of coalition pressures within their own governments and those of their allies, although in one case (France) it was the failure of past coalition constraints to re-emerge that undercut the militant diplomacy of its adversaries. This paper will conclude with generalizations about the politics of crisis management in other key 19th and 20th CenturyGreat Power conflicts, i.e., the Crimean War, the Wars for German Unification, and World War II, while also acknowledging the exceptional coherence of Soviet and U.S. decision making in Cold War crises.

2008 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 6724 words || 
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5. Scherlen, Renee. "Bright Beginnings, Failed Finales: The Sexenio Pattern of US Perceptions of Mexican Counter Narcotics Efforts" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel Intercontinental, New Orleans, LA, Jan 09, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p212232_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: For over two decades, the drug war was been a central policy concern for Mexican presidents. Yet, despite government efforts, drug trafficking remains a tremendous challenge. This paper compares and contrasts past Mexican administrations’ drug enforcement policies. The findings indicate that all of the administrations had a common “sexenio pattern.” This suggests that the current efforts of the Calderon Administration are likely to fall into the same pattern. The paper argues that policy change would help achieve better results in the drug war, but are unlikely to be adopted. Political pressure on the part of the United States, as well as insight into policy making from prospect theory, explain the persistence of this failed policy.

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