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2015 - ASALH Centennial Annual Meeting and Conference Words: 71 words || 
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1. Muhammad, Baiyina. "Finding My Grandmother, Finding Myself: NOI Pioneer, Mable Carrie Foreman (1908-1980)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASALH Centennial Annual Meeting and Conference, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA, <Not Available>. 2019-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1039608_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Mable Carrie Foreman was widowed at age 49 and raised six of her seven children as a single parent. Unlike many Black women coming of age in the rural Jim Crow South, Mable chose the "Nation" and not the "Church" to help her find solace. The NOI's message of God's concern for the liberation of Black people appealed to her and so many other women seeking empowerment in America.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5994 words || 
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2. Jang, Sou Hyun. "Finding Dr. Kim: Factors Associated with How Korean Immigrants Find Doctors in the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1377759_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Using a mixed method with a survey of 440 Korean immigrants and in-depth personal interviews with 120 Korean immigrants in the New York-New Jersey area, this paper examines how immigrants find doctors in the US and what factors are associated with their search. The study finds that the vast majority of Korean immigrants heavily depends on what is known as “Dr. Kim,” co-ethnic doctors in the US. Interpersonal methods are the most popular way to find doctors, followed by other methods such as using Korean business directories. By applying Andersen’s healthcare utilization model, this paper finds that different factors are related to different search methods. Predisposing factors are associated with interpersonal methods, whereas need and immigrant factors are associated with internet-based methods. The ethnicity of family doctors is also related to search methods. In addition to the factors introduced by Andersen, the analysis of in-depth interviews reveals that Korean immigrants’ legal status and engagement in the ethnic community - either professionally or religiously - are other important factors involved in their search for doctors in the US. This paper methodologically and empirically contributes to the literature on immigrant health by examining a substantial sample of one ethnic immigrant group in a particular area in the US. Moreover, it makes a theoretical contribution by confirming that Andersen’s healthcare utilization model applies to immigrants’ search for doctors in the US.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 12187 words || 
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3. Bass, Brooke. "Finding Work or Finding Identity? Job Search Strategies Among the Homeless" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562084_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study draws on data from interviews with a sample of 35 job-seeking homeless adults to demonstrate how the job search is informed by identity. I find that despite the reality of structurally constrained employment opportunities, homeless individuals use specific job search strategies (by either “settling” or “holding out” for work) in an effort to attain work which is consistent with their identity. However, while the latter strategy has the potential to increase their likelihood of securing a “good” job, it also undermines their likelihood of finding a job at all. For the homeless, who can afford little margin for error, this may further inhibit their chances of establishing self-sufficiency. Thus, the findings of this study suggest that even the most resource-constrained individuals heed the importance of identity consistency in their search for paid labor, thereby lending support to a theory that recognizes social psychological processes as an important piece of the job search puzzle.

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