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2014 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7552 words || 
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1. Lee, Young-Im. "First Daughter, First Lady, and First Woman President: Geun-hye Park’s Presidential Campaign in 2012" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, The Hyatt Regency New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 08, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p695495_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, I am going to explore how gender stereotype shaped barriers and opportunities for Geun-hye Park’s successful presidential campaign in 2012. The late authoritarian leader’s daughter being the first woman president in South Korea drew domestic and international attention as well as raised concerns over the future of democracy in the relatively recently industrialized and democratized country.
Following a framework presented in Cracking the Highest Glass Ceiling edited by Rainbow Murray (2010), I am going to examine the gendered media coverage of Park in Presidential Election in terms of gender stereotypes, media framing, double binds, and external factors. I am going to conduct content analyses of the way five major newspapers in South Korea across the ideological spectrum framed the first woman presidential candidate for four months during her bid for the office, from the day she won the candidacy of Saenuri Party to Election Day. Through this study, I will assess how useful the existing theories and frameworks on women running for top national executive offices in explaining the role of gender in the recent presidential election in South Korea.

2018 - Comparative and International Education Society Conference Words: 320 words || 
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2. Jacobo, Yensi. "From South to North, from ABCs to PhDs: Impact of being a first-generation American and first-generation college student" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Conference, Hilton Mexico City Reforma Hotel, Mexico City, Mexico, <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1349106_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper explores what it means to be a first-generation college student, while being a first generation American-Mexican. Are these identities in conflict with each other? Utilizing Gloria Anzaldúa’s ways of knowing, concocimiento, further allows to view the first-generation student’s southern perspective in a way that helps “educators [to] strengthen their own ways of knowing and create a more equitable pedagogy for all students [and] help co-construct the bridges families…have already begun to build.” (Kasum, 2016, p.129).
Being both a first-generation American and college student comes with a unique set of challenges, but at the same time, if adequately acknowledged can be a source of strength. “For first-generation students, going to college represents a significant separation from family and heritage, and parents, siblings, and friends who have no experience with college” (Ward, Siegel, & Davenport, 2012, p. 73) thus creating a level of uncertainty within the student. Utilizing the Ethic of Critique theory (Owens & Valesky, 2015), educational leaders can help link the southern perspective of first-generation American students to their northern, undergraduate educational environment. According to Owens and Valesky (2015) the Ethic of Critique takes into account the individual strengths diverse student bring to the forefront that then can be utilized for their own growth. In this way, educational leaders can facilitate a process by which students integrate these aspects of their identities, with the basis that their home culture has value and can positively inform their experience at the university level.


References
Kasum, S.G. (2016) Transnational Mexican-origin families' ways of knowing: A framework toward bridging understandings in U.S. Schools. Equity & Excellence in Education, 49(2), 129-142. DOI: 10.1080/10665684.2015.1086243.
Owens, R.E. Jr., & Valesky, T.C. (2015). Organizational behavior in the education: Leadership and school reform, 11th ed. Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon Educational Leadership. SBN-13: 978-0133489033.
Ward, L., Siegel, M. J., & Davenport, Z. (2012). First-generation college students: Understanding and improving the experience from recruitment to commencement. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral.proquest.com.

2014 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 975 words || 
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3. Leukou Nzoutchoum, Ornella. "Stress and Coping Mechanisms Experienced by First-Generation College Students and their Non-First-Generation Peers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, Oregon, Mar 27, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p708156_index.html>
Publication Type: Undergraduate Poster Presentations
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2015 - Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 144 words || 
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4. Debassige, Brent. "First Nations Reconceptualize Assessment: an Investigation into Indigenous Forms of Measurement across Three First Nations Communities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eleventh International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 20, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p991466_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Until recently there has not been a comprehensive approach for measuring First Nations, Metis and Inuit learning in Canada (Canadian Council on Learning [CCL], 2009). While the holistic lifelong learning models produced by the CCL have initiated frameworks for measuring students learning, the findings from the CCL reports specify the need for tailoring the models to fit specific locales. In this session, the presenter shares preliminary findings from a SSHRC-funded qualitative study focusing on reconceptualized approaches to understanding assessment in First Nations contexts. The researcher used semi-structured conversational interviews to investigate how members of three First Nations communities in southern Ontario, Canada come-to-know Indigenous Knowledge and how that knowing is assessed, generally. The preliminary findings indicate that Indigenous forms of measurement occur when focussed on observing informal learning experiences that are context-specific and based on when a learner indicates that the time is right.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 8858 words || 
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5. Capizzo, Luke. "The First Generation: Lessons from the public relations industry’s first university-trained social media practitioners" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282915_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Public relations educators are grappling with the best methods to prepare undergraduates for the constantly shifting world of social media practice. The recent graduates (2011-2016) interviewed for this study constitute the first generation of practitioners with robust, formal social media training. Their experiences in school and in the workforce reinforce some current best practices—such as the value of internship experiences, the resonance of case studies, and the importance of excellent writing skills—but also point toward the need for increased emphasis on strategic social media, brand writing, visual communication, and the continued importance of a deeply integrated curriculum. Using social cognitive theory as a guiding framework, this study examines the salience of observational learning, behavior modeling, and self efficacy for building pedagogical theory for the social media classroom.

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