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2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 8927 words || 
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1. Cranford, Cynthia. "Flexible Work or Flexible Employment?: Flexibility against Security in the Private Home Care Sector in Los Angeles" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p184785_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: It is widely thought that there is an inherent mismatch between flexible services and economic security for the workers providing those services. However, the conflict between flexibility and security may be due to the conflation of flexible service-work and flexible employment. Part of a larger, qualitative study comparing public and private home care models in different locations, this paper examines the conflict between flexibility and security in the private home care market in the Greater Los Angeles Area. Using in-depth interviews with 20 owners and managers of home care companies, flexibility in service-work – that is, what, where, when, and how services are provided -- are analyzed alongside flexibility in employment relations -- namely the status of the workers as contractors or contractors and the temporary form of employment. The findings suggest that the conflict between flexibility and security stems from owners’ and managers’ use of flexible employment to secure their profit in a highly competitive market, rather than an inherent incompatibility between flexibility for clients and security for workers.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Fox, Kimberly. and Cantzler, Julia. "Many Faces of Flexibility: Managers’ Discourses of Flexibility in a Changing Work Environment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1122340_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This article examines the discourses surrounding the practice of flexible work arrangements (FWAs) among managers in the technology division of a Fortune 500 company. Much of the existing literature on the use of flexible work arrangements (FWAs) examines employees’ access to flexible arrangements and their role in the increased intensity of work (MacEachon et al 2008; See also Blair-Loy 2009, and Kelliher and Anderson 2010). Research contends that FWAs tend to prioritize workplace productivity rather than employee well-being (Cornfield et al. 2001). However, few studies consider how FWAs are understood and enacted within the workplace. Unlike other studies that have examined the discourses regarding flexibility, health and well-being by interviewing a variety of managers from different companies (MacEachon et. al.), we looked at managers within a single company and explore their practices within the same workplace as part of the larger, longitudinal Work, Family, and Health Study (WFHS). Based on discursive analysis of 103 baseline interviews, we find that managers employ a fair amount of agency in their implementation of FWAs. Unlike studies suggesting that managers use FWAs to emphasize workplace productivity above other considerations, we find that managers’ motivations are mixed, demonstrating concern for employee well-being as well as workplace productivity. What’s more, differences in the practices of, and motivations for, FWAs among managers seems tied to their proximity to upper-administration in terms of either geographic or hierarchical location.

2006 - International Studies Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 12780 words || 
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3. Dufour, Frédérick Guillaume. "Flexible Citizenship and Flexible Labour" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p100180_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper will address the relative absence of concern for unprotected labour in contemporary theorizing of citizenship and nationalism. Contemporary studies of nationalism and citizenship have developed along several key axes. At the normative level, they have questioned the issue of the co-existence between collective rights, minority rights and individual rights. At the empirical level, they have questioned how socio-cultural and socio-political processes have imprint nationalist movements and nationalist traditions with specific mechanisms of exclusion. This literature often situates its analysis at a purely political level as if the formation of meaningful citizenship could be detached from the analysis of the labour process. I argue that the exclusion from the recognition of citizenship in the everyday life is informed by a relational dynamic where the labour process and the recognition of citizenship are intertwined. In order to theorized the ways in which globalization creates new forms of exclusion, studies of citizenship must developed tools of analysis to question systematically the relation between the unprotected workers and the creation of zones of second class abject citizens.

2009 - SASE Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 8832 words || 
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4. Veenendaal, André., van Velzen, Martijn. and Looise, Jan Kees. "Be Flexible or Die? Exploring the Relation between Flexible Staffing Practices and Product Innovation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Sciences Po, Paris, France, Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p315471_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This contribution explores the thesis that innovative strength of firms can be enhanced through the use of flexible staffing practices. Here, ‘flexible staffing arrangements’ are defined as ‘temporary employment contracts’. The temporariness usually means that a contract ends after a predefined period or after the conclusion of a specified project. The underlying theoretical notion of this thesis can be found in the literature on ‘creative capital’ (Florida, 2002), which seeks to explain the innovativeness of permeable organizations, characterized by a relatively high influx of workers who remain temporary with a firm, apply their relevant skills and knowledge (i.e. ‘creative capital’), and then move on to another job elsewhere on the labor market. The ‘creative capital’ approach challenges conventional theories, notably the ‘social capital’ theory (e.g. Bourdieu 1986; Coleman 1990; Putnam 1995), which sees stability, notably in terms of employment security, as a prerequisite for innovation.

In this paper the question is addressed whether firms that use flexible workers in positions that are germane to innovation can gain innovative strength over firms that do not use flexible workers in these positions. In this contribution, we start to answer this question by drawing the framework for a case-study analysis of two dozen firms in the Dutch manufacturing industry, using company data from in-depth interviews with representatives and from questionnaires. Selection for the manufacturing industry is motivated by the fact that this sector, probably more than other industries in the Netherlands, feels the need to compete on quality, which calls for continuous improvement of both process and product. Furthermore, some empirical evidence for the creative capital notion has been found only in the information technology industry (e.g. Saxenian, 1994; Hyde, 2003; Nesheim et al. 2007). This warrants the question whether similar signs can be found in other industries as well.

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