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2019 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 181 words || 
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1. Bjarnøe, Camilla., Boydstun, Amber. and Adams, James. "Does the Press’ Focus on Issues vs. Character Match Candidates’ Focus?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, Marriott Wardman Park, the Omni Shoreham, and the Hilton Washington, Washington, DC, Aug 28, 2019 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1522652_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: News coverage of candidates during election campaigns can influence who wins and who loses elections. Although candidates can decide how much of their campaign messaging to spend on portrayals of policy issue stances versus personal character, they have less control over how their messaging is represented in the news. We know little about how news representations of candidates’ self-portrayals (via quotations and paraphrases of candidate statements selected by journalists) compare with journalists’ portrayals of the candidates (via the portion of news coverage of candidates that is not cribbed directly from candidates’ messaging). Do candidates and the press present similar or different portrayals? We investigate this question using systematic content analysis of national news coverage of election campaigns across ten western democracies (20 elections in total), and find that while candidates talk about issues (as captured in their quoted/paraphrased remarks in the news), the press tends to downplay issues and talk more about candidates’ character. The findings have implications for candidates’ campaign strategies, for the relationship between the press and candidates, and for normative questions about the press’ role in contemporary democracy.

2010 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 102 words || 
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2. Yano, Kimberly., Weaver, Christopher., Karl, Philip. and Jackson, Rebecca. "Reported PTSD Assessment Practices of PTSD-focused and Forensic-focused Clinicians: Diagnosis and Overreporting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Mar 18, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399154_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We surveyed “PTSD-focused” and “forensic-focused” psychologists to inquire about their “usual practice” of and attitudes toward a number of elements of PTSD assessment, specifically including overreporting of symptoms. Analyses indicated differences in approaches to overreporting, despite similar estimates of overreporting and potential for secondary gain. Empirical support for PTSD measures was desired by respondents, but the empirical support of many current PTSD instruments was unknown to them. Implications for these preliminary findings and their impact on forensic practice include a) the potential need for an integrated assessment of PTSD and dissimulation, and b) the legal admissibility of PTSD-focused clinicians’ assessments.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 125 words || 
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3. Magnus, Amy. and Willis, Carolyn. "Moving Between Infinity Focus and Aperture: The Researcher’s Lens and the Focus of Research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1044938_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Paper
Abstract: Research methodology can take various forms. Qualitative work derives much of its strength from the interpretive lens by which researchers see and understand the social world. This paper provides discussion on methodological practices used by a team of researchers examining self-help services and protection order decision-making practices in a domestic violence specialty court. Each researcher on the team brings with them a unique lens through which they experience the research site, and interact with the data collected. This paper emphasizes the importance of individual researcher experiences within a collaborative qualitative research team and the value of realizing each researcher’s lens. Finally, this paper discusses the benefits of embracing a constant state of research “aperture,” and the resulting critical lens that persists in qualitative research methodology.

2015 - DSI Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Castel, Matthew., Vickery, Shawnee. and Narayanan, Sriram. "Hospital focus: the effects of focus mismatch on hospital outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the DSI Annual Meeting, Sheraton Seattle Hotel, Seattle, Washington, Nov 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1045657_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Hospital focus stresses the necessity for resources to align with the patient segment needs. However, not all patient needs are aligned with the hospital service profile. The question we center upon is: What happens to hospital outcome measures when the fit between hospital, patient, and condition do not align?

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 151 words || 
Info
5. Gipson, Christina. and Bowers, Ashley. "Examining the Integrity of Focus Groups: Using journaling to augment focus groups" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p719732_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to examine the integrity of focus groups when used with other methods in a study to understand current female students’ experiences and expectations within the sport industry. Focus groups are beneficial because they enable researchers to examine ideas, experiences, opinions, beliefs, storytelling, and self-presentation. In addition, through this research method, participants can generate their own questions and frameworks through discussions. Yet, researchers cannot guarantee that participants are honest. Further, researchers cannot understand how other focus group participants will impact other participants. To test the integrity of focus groups, three were developed with 4-5 female participants. One group participated in a traditional focus group with a question and answer session. The second focus group participated in a traditional focus group and kept a journal during and after the focus group. The third group participated in a virtual focus group conversation that was completed via email.

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