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2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 575 words || 
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1. Yemini, Miri. "Focusing In and Focusing Out: A case study of history curricula transformation in the Israeli education system" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 10, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634901_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Historically, throughout the nineteenth century mass-schooling emerged to transmit a dominant social, cultural and political system to young people, with the goal of creating a cohesive nation-state (Coulby & Zambeta, 2005). Thus, schooling was exploited for the construction of closed national communities where citizens in the same geographic territory were conceptualized as a homogenous group, an 'imagined community', with an ethnoculturally distinct polity (Anderson, 1991). Indeed, national and local values are traditionally perceived as key factors in nation-building and socialization of young people. Schooling for the general public and state control of curricula and textbooks were an integral part of the process of nation building and the creation of social cohesion in the interest of emerging industrial societies (Wimmer, 2002). Today, in contrast, higher education institutions and workplaces seek out students and employees with global consciousness, thus forcing schools to prepare internationalized graduates – or internationalized pupils. In fact, international (cosmopolitan) capital in Bourdieu’s terms (1986) has become a desirable asset for middle-income families in developed as well as developing countries (Hayden, 2011).
Moreover, during the last decades, education systems worldwide have been facing increasing need to adapt to a rapidly changing post-industrial global environment laden with social, technological, economic and political transformations. The unprecedented growth, complexity and competitiveness of the global economy with its attendant socio-political and technological developments have been creating relentless and cumulative pressures on the education systems to respond to the changing environment. Indeed, the technological and dynamic 21st century environment results in children living and studying in a global world and using novel tools, devices and skills, thus forcing schools to adapt to the new way of teaching and learning in internationalized way (Valentine & Holloway, 2002). The pressures of cosmopolitanism emerge on top of the existing pressures of nationalization, thus forcing education systems to comply with contradicting influences and trends. Moreover, neo-institutionalists in large-scale international comparative studies demonstrated that schools' curricula, policy and organization converge in different nations due to top-down processes that developed in a network of international organizations and global society. Those isomorphic conversions are later adopted by individual nation states, promoted and transmitted through various powerful mechanisms (e.g., international standards, conferences and agreements) (Meyer, 2007; Frank et al., 2000). Thus, the dialogue between nation-building, socialization ideology and nationalism together with neo-institutional homogenizing influences creates complex multidimensional pressures on education systems that schools express in various ways.
Given the importance of history studies to the nation-state’s identity definition and collective memory and ethos, the global/local transformation in history curricula can serve as a litmus test in studying the internationalization intensity of education systems, (Resnik, 2007). This work aims to assess the global versus local variation in history curricula over time in the Israeli education system, based on a comprehensive examination of history matriculation exams and in-depth interviews with key professionals in the Israeli Ministry of Education.We undertake a comprehensive content analysis of compulsory matriculation exams in history for public, secular, Jewish Israeli schools. We complement this systematic content analysis with in-depth interviews with Ministry of Education central decision-makers to document and evaluate international versus national trends. The major aim of this work is to enquire whether and to which extent internationalization (in this sense inclusion of an international dimension in education) is taking place in the public Israeli history curriculum and to identify trends regarding this phenomenon over time. The Israeli case may serve as reference point in future research, advancing the study of internationalization processes in schools.

2015 - DSI Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Castel, Matthew., Vickery, Shawnee. and Narayanan, Sriram. "Hospital focus: the effects of focus mismatch on hospital outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the DSI Annual Meeting, Sheraton Seattle Hotel, Seattle, Washington, Nov 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1045657_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Hospital focus stresses the necessity for resources to align with the patient segment needs. However, not all patient needs are aligned with the hospital service profile. The question we center upon is: What happens to hospital outcome measures when the fit between hospital, patient, and condition do not align?

2006 - American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Words: 242 words || 
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3. Huston, Sally. and Hobson, Eric. "Focusing attention on focus groups: strengthening methods to strengthen results" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, San Diego, California, USA, Jul 05, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p119034_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Objectives/Intent:
To educate the Assessment Committee and pharmacy faculty about purposes, methods, and caveats governing focus groups for data collection.

Methods/Process
Focus groups are structured small-group meetings to encourage exchange of opinions and feedback related to a topic of common concern. Focus groups contain three discrete roles: meeting facilitator, recorder, and informants.

The project drew upon the authors’ expertise and upon literature from outside of the discipline to construct a concise guide to methodologically-sound focus group use within the School.

Results/Outcomes
Focus groups are not complex; yet, their effectiveness depends upon their execution. The guide reviewed methodology, placed the method within the School’s assessment model, and outlined a pre-, during-, and post-session protocol. The goal was to systematize the method, reduce common methodological weaknesses, and amplify inherent strengths, so that results could be used with confidence. A faculty development program on focus group management followed.

Implications
Focus groups are powerful research tools for collecting qualitative information across disparate contexts, and are recommended for gathering information (formative and summative) relevant to faculty/staff issues, student experience, and curricular effectiveness. They accrue multiple benefits via one structure: collect information about the curriculum at the macro-level, assure timely professor-students exchange of perceptions of micro-level course effectiveness, and encourage broad participation in on-going attempts to improve School activities. As with any research methodology, however, results validity is conditioned by processes followed. Formalizing a protocol and training faculty to use it is important if regular student/stakeholder focus groups are a central assessment plan component.

2012 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Pages: unavailable || Words: 4099 words || 
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4. Orman, Evelyn. "Effect of Virtual Reality Exposure and Aural Stimuli on Eye Contact, Directional Focus, and Focus of Attention" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, Thessaloniki Concert Hall, Thessaloniki, Greece, Jul 15, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p553551_index.html>
Publication Type: Spoken Paper (Full Paper) for Commission Seminars
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study sought to determine the effects of virtual reality immersion and audio on eye contact, directional focus and focus of attention for novice wind band conductors. Participants (N = 34) were randomly assigned to a contact control group (n = 12) or a virtual reality group with (n = 10) or without head tracking (n = 12). Treatment consisted of 9–minute conducting/score study sessions twice a week for 4 weeks. Following each treatment session, participants answered questions addressing their focus of attention. Individual videotaped conducting sessions of a live ensemble before and after treatment were analyzed and served as pre and posttest measures. Even though all groups increased their eye contact and directional focus from pre to posttest, there were no significant differences (p > .05) in these changes due to virtual reality immersion. Further analyses with a larger dataset (N = 68) showed those working with audio (n = 34) as compared to no audio (n = 34) significantly increased (p < .05) their use of eye contact for the fast portion of the musical selection. No other significant differences among audio and no audio groups were found. Focus of attention analysis showed that virtual reality participants indicated they worked on eye contact significantly more (p < .05) than those in the control group. Findings indicate 1) a sense of reality is created during virtual reality immersion and 2) the use of sound during score study may be beneficial for increasing conductor eye contact.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6875 words || 
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5. Napierski-Prancl, Michelle. "Focusing on Mothers: Employing Focus Groups to Deconstruct the Mommy Wars" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 09, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p652588_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores the methodology utilized in a study on the institution of motherhood and the arenas in which mothering occurs. It brings together the voices of women at the heart of the “Mommy Wars:” working and stay-at-home middle class mothers of young children. Building upon the work of Rich (1976), O’Reilly (2006) and others, the focus groups explore both motherhood as an oppressive institution and mothering as an empowered choice. Focus groups allow the mothers to address the controversies themselves and respond to the scholarship that finds either a loss of independence or an opportunity for creative expression of self when one becomes a mother. By giving voice to the women our media and culture are talking about but not listening to, these focus groups provide valuable feminist insight. Through dialogue we learn where the mothers place themselves within this debate.

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