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2010 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 102 words || 
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1. Yano, Kimberly., Weaver, Christopher., Karl, Philip. and Jackson, Rebecca. "Reported PTSD Assessment Practices of PTSD-focused and Forensic-focused Clinicians: Diagnosis and Overreporting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Mar 18, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399154_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We surveyed “PTSD-focused” and “forensic-focused” psychologists to inquire about their “usual practice” of and attitudes toward a number of elements of PTSD assessment, specifically including overreporting of symptoms. Analyses indicated differences in approaches to overreporting, despite similar estimates of overreporting and potential for secondary gain. Empirical support for PTSD measures was desired by respondents, but the empirical support of many current PTSD instruments was unknown to them. Implications for these preliminary findings and their impact on forensic practice include a) the potential need for an integrated assessment of PTSD and dissimulation, and b) the legal admissibility of PTSD-focused clinicians’ assessments.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6875 words || 
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2. Napierski-Prancl, Michelle. "Focusing on Mothers: Employing Focus Groups to Deconstruct the Mommy Wars" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 09, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p652588_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores the methodology utilized in a study on the institution of motherhood and the arenas in which mothering occurs. It brings together the voices of women at the heart of the “Mommy Wars:” working and stay-at-home middle class mothers of young children. Building upon the work of Rich (1976), O’Reilly (2006) and others, the focus groups explore both motherhood as an oppressive institution and mothering as an empowered choice. Focus groups allow the mothers to address the controversies themselves and respond to the scholarship that finds either a loss of independence or an opportunity for creative expression of self when one becomes a mother. By giving voice to the women our media and culture are talking about but not listening to, these focus groups provide valuable feminist insight. Through dialogue we learn where the mothers place themselves within this debate.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 151 words || 
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3. Gipson, Christina. and Bowers, Ashley. "Examining the Integrity of Focus Groups: Using journaling to augment focus groups" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 21, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p719732_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this presentation is to examine the integrity of focus groups when used with other methods in a study to understand current female students’ experiences and expectations within the sport industry. Focus groups are beneficial because they enable researchers to examine ideas, experiences, opinions, beliefs, storytelling, and self-presentation. In addition, through this research method, participants can generate their own questions and frameworks through discussions. Yet, researchers cannot guarantee that participants are honest. Further, researchers cannot understand how other focus group participants will impact other participants. To test the integrity of focus groups, three were developed with 4-5 female participants. One group participated in a traditional focus group with a question and answer session. The second focus group participated in a traditional focus group and kept a journal during and after the focus group. The third group participated in a virtual focus group conversation that was completed via email.

2013 - 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 575 words || 
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4. Yemini, Miri. "Focusing In and Focusing Out: A case study of history curricula transformation in the Israeli education system" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 57th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Hilton Riverside Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 10, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634901_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Historically, throughout the nineteenth century mass-schooling emerged to transmit a dominant social, cultural and political system to young people, with the goal of creating a cohesive nation-state (Coulby & Zambeta, 2005). Thus, schooling was exploited for the construction of closed national communities where citizens in the same geographic territory were conceptualized as a homogenous group, an 'imagined community', with an ethnoculturally distinct polity (Anderson, 1991). Indeed, national and local values are traditionally perceived as key factors in nation-building and socialization of young people. Schooling for the general public and state control of curricula and textbooks were an integral part of the process of nation building and the creation of social cohesion in the interest of emerging industrial societies (Wimmer, 2002). Today, in contrast, higher education institutions and workplaces seek out students and employees with global consciousness, thus forcing schools to prepare internationalized graduates – or internationalized pupils. In fact, international (cosmopolitan) capital in Bourdieu’s terms (1986) has become a desirable asset for middle-income families in developed as well as developing countries (Hayden, 2011).
Moreover, during the last decades, education systems worldwide have been facing increasing need to adapt to a rapidly changing post-industrial global environment laden with social, technological, economic and political transformations. The unprecedented growth, complexity and competitiveness of the global economy with its attendant socio-political and technological developments have been creating relentless and cumulative pressures on the education systems to respond to the changing environment. Indeed, the technological and dynamic 21st century environment results in children living and studying in a global world and using novel tools, devices and skills, thus forcing schools to adapt to the new way of teaching and learning in internationalized way (Valentine & Holloway, 2002). The pressures of cosmopolitanism emerge on top of the existing pressures of nationalization, thus forcing education systems to comply with contradicting influences and trends. Moreover, neo-institutionalists in large-scale international comparative studies demonstrated that schools' curricula, policy and organization converge in different nations due to top-down processes that developed in a network of international organizations and global society. Those isomorphic conversions are later adopted by individual nation states, promoted and transmitted through various powerful mechanisms (e.g., international standards, conferences and agreements) (Meyer, 2007; Frank et al., 2000). Thus, the dialogue between nation-building, socialization ideology and nationalism together with neo-institutional homogenizing influences creates complex multidimensional pressures on education systems that schools express in various ways.
Given the importance of history studies to the nation-state’s identity definition and collective memory and ethos, the global/local transformation in history curricula can serve as a litmus test in studying the internationalization intensity of education systems, (Resnik, 2007). This work aims to assess the global versus local variation in history curricula over time in the Israeli education system, based on a comprehensive examination of history matriculation exams and in-depth interviews with key professionals in the Israeli Ministry of Education.We undertake a comprehensive content analysis of compulsory matriculation exams in history for public, secular, Jewish Israeli schools. We complement this systematic content analysis with in-depth interviews with Ministry of Education central decision-makers to document and evaluate international versus national trends. The major aim of this work is to enquire whether and to which extent internationalization (in this sense inclusion of an international dimension in education) is taking place in the public Israeli history curriculum and to identify trends regarding this phenomenon over time. The Israeli case may serve as reference point in future research, advancing the study of internationalization processes in schools.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 125 words || 
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5. Magnus, Amy. and Willis, Carolyn. "Moving Between Infinity Focus and Aperture: The Researcher’s Lens and the Focus of Research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1044938_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable Paper
Abstract: Research methodology can take various forms. Qualitative work derives much of its strength from the interpretive lens by which researchers see and understand the social world. This paper provides discussion on methodological practices used by a team of researchers examining self-help services and protection order decision-making practices in a domestic violence specialty court. Each researcher on the team brings with them a unique lens through which they experience the research site, and interact with the data collected. This paper emphasizes the importance of individual researcher experiences within a collaborative qualitative research team and the value of realizing each researcher’s lens. Finally, this paper discusses the benefits of embracing a constant state of research “aperture,” and the resulting critical lens that persists in qualitative research methodology.

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