Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 47 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10  - Next
2012 - Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies 44th Annual Convention Words: 101 words || 
Info
1. Corbett, Joyce. "Folklore and Folklorism: Independent Research in the Former Austro-Hungarian Empire." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies 44th Annual Convention, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p567926_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Research with a focus on folk costume and textiles in Central and Eastern Europe conducted over a thirty-year period will be discussed. This paper will contrast research conducted as an independent scholar versus studies made with institutional support. Research in folk art immediately draws the investigator into regions in which the territorial borders no longer exist, have changed, or are in the process of being re-evaluated. This presents both challenges and opportunities for the independent scholar. Examples of woman’s folk dress will be presented from Bistrita-Nasaud, Romania; Kalocsa, Hungary; and Moravia, Czech Republic in which costume reflects nationalism, folklorism, and continuity.

2013 - Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies 45th Annual Convention Words: 83 words || 
Info
2. Mihailova, Mihaela. "Animated Folklore and Soviet Propaganda in Samoyed Boy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies 45th Annual Convention, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p653495_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This talk will focus on the 1928 animated short Samoyed Boy (dir. Valentina and Zinaida Brumberg). It will explore the use of Samoyedic folklore and imagery in the film (particularly vis-a-vis the figure of the shaman) and the problematic space folklore occupies in the propaganda strategy of the piece. Specifically, the paper will discuss the ways in which the treatment of folklore in Samoyed Boy both illuminates and complicates contemporary attitudes towards religion and towards the incorporation of "peripheral" peoples into the USSR.

2015 - Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Whitley, Hannah. "Diversity Disconnect At Universities in the Pacific Northwest: Folklore, Myths and Misconceptions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Pacific Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Long Beach, CA, Apr 01, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p979426_index.html>
Publication Type: Undergraduate Poster Presentations
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 7646 words || 
Info
4. Reijnders, Stijn. "The people’s detective: true crime in Dutch folklore and popular television" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112718_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: ‘Peter R. de Vries’ is a Dutch true crime television programme in the tradition of ‘America’s Most Wanted’. Critics say it is a threat to the moral order and the paradigm of an over-commercialised, degenerate television culture. This paper argues differently: programmes such as ‘Peter R. de Vries’ follow an existing tradition and morality in the history of popular culture. The nineteenth century saw various forms of entertainment that revolved around true crime. A comparison between these forms and the ‘Peter R. de Vries’ episodes revealed striking similarities. Nevertheless, ‘Peter R. de Vries’ is not a straightforward translation of folklore to television codes. The program also incorporates features of more recent genres. ‘Peter R. de Vries’ takes up a position in the vacuum between the official system of justice and the popular sense of justice, fulfilling a traditional need using new media.

2008 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 462 words || 
Info
5. Mellard, Jason. "An Enemy of Reactionary Demagogues: Southwestern Folklore, Civic Engagement, and the Multifaceted J. Frank Dobie" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Oct 16, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-11-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p244858_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Henry Nash Smith wrote of Southwestern folklorist J. Frank Dobie that he “was a man of two widely different public personalities. One of them is a personification of the Old West, a picturesque and harmless figure out of the past. The other. . . is a powerful controversialist with a zest for speaking his mind on economic and political issues.” This paper revisits the career of J. Frank Dobie with a critical eye towards this bifurcated persona, investigating Dobie’s troubled navigations between popular scholarship and civic engagement in mid-twentieth century Texas. Speaking in front of non-academic audiences and writing in syndicated newspaper columns, Dobie cut the figure of “Mr. Texas,” a veritable celebrity of home-spun frontier wisdom, but he also adopted political stands on labor unions, the New Deal, race, and anti-communism that were well-nigh heretical to much of his readership and, as it turned out, to his employers on the University of Texas Board of Regents. The paper draws on rich archival sources at the University of Texas at Austin and Texas State University to demonstrate four consecutive points. First, I will introduce Dobie as a Thirties Regionalist and undervalued influence on early work in American Studies (Smith had, after all, prefaced Virgin Land by thanking Dobie for convincing him of the significance of the American West as a subject). Second, I explore Dobie’s career as public intellectual, split between his performance as the “cowboy professor” and the critical ire that led him to brand his conservative adversaries in the state as “homemade fascists.” Next, I turn from this public persona to Dobie’s body of work itself, some two dozen books of folklore fixated on rattlesnakes, cowboys, longhorns, and buried treasure. Dobie’s public engagement evaporates in his scholarship which, if anything, would seem to construct a vision of the Anglo-Texan herrenvolk with which his homemade fascists might have found little to quibble. It is Dobie’s exceedingly problematic engagement with race and place in his written work that raises my final point. Just as Dobie figured into the origin narratives of American Studies, his skewed work on the borderlands served as an important counterpoint for foundational scholarship in the field of Mexican American Studies. If Dobie counts among Henry Nash Smith’s muses, he numbers as well amongst Américo Paredes’s bête noirs. Parsing through these various Dobies of ivory towers, barricades, and chaparral may seem at first glance to be an antiquarian exercise. However, Dobie’s example, though largely a negative one, remains instructive for our continued efforts to define what it is that we as American Studies practitioners do, balancing the demands of critical scholarship with a desire to communicate our conclusions and habits of mind in a wider public sphere.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10  - Next

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy