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2008 - International Congress for Conservation Biology Words: 200 words || 
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1. Wickliffe, Lisa. and Jodice, Patrick. "FISHERIES DISCARDS AS FOOD FOR SEABIRDS: FAST FOOD, JUNK FOOD, OR HEALTH FOOD?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Congress for Conservation Biology, Convention Center, Chattanooga, TN, Jul 10, 2008 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p244230_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Population dynamics of seabirds have been linked to availability of bycatch discarded from commercial fishery operations. In South Carolina, USA, populations of brown pelicans and royal terns have declined since the late 1980s, populations of sandwich terns and laughing gulls have increased, but the mechanisms underlying these shifts are unclear. South Carolina also supports a shrimp fleet that operates in inshore waters where these species forage. We examined the distribution and abundance of seabirds at shrimp trawlers in relation to colony locations. We also determined the fate of fish discarded as bycatch and the energy density of the discarded fish. Trawlers were attended regularly by all species of locally breeding seabirds out to ca. 30 km from colonies. Laughing gulls were the most frequently observed seabird at trawlers followed by brown pelicans, royal terns, and sandwich terns. Seabirds selected smaller discard items compared to larger items, and selected benthic fish that typically would not be available as prey. Laughing gulls may be affected most strongly by the availability of additional food via discarded bycatch but terns and pelicans forage at trawlers frequently enough that changes in the size or trawling patterns of the shrimp fleet could affect their foraging ecology.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 7604 words || 
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2. De Backer, Charlotte. and Ponnet, Koen. "Our Food Versus My Food: Investigating If and How Shared Food Practices During Childhood Relate to Adult Prosocial Behavior Among Belgian and Taiwanese Students" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p714341_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study focuses on the connection between prosocial behavior, defined as acting in ways that benefits others, and shared meals, defined as meals that consist of food(s) to be shared with others. Because food needs to be shared with multiple members, shared meals create situations where consumers are confronted with issues of fairness and respect in their interaction with others. One cannot be greedy and take all or most of a dish, but rules of polite food sharing need to be obeyed. From this it is assumed that those who often engage in shared meals will be more prosocial compared to those who less often take part of shared meals. To test this, data about past shared meal frequencies and current acts of prosocial behavior was collected by means of cross-sectional surveys in Belgium (n = 487) and Taiwan (n = 275).

2015 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 255 words || 
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3. Wishnick, Elizabeth. "The Debate over GM Food in China: Implications for Food Safety, Food Security, and Trade" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Hotel & Towers, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p949280_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In China genetically modified (GM) foods have been the subject of considerable debate. China only allows the planting of GM crops that are not used for food, such as cotton, though imported food crops from GM seeds, such as US soybeans, are allowed. China has banned the import of GM corn since 2013, thereby excluding US suppliers. In May 2014, just months after China’s Minister of Agriculture declared GM foods safe for consumption, the Chinese military cited health concerns in banning their consumption by the military.

This paper examines the recent debates in China over GM food in the context of growing concern in the country over food safety and food security. Due to concerns over rising food prices contributing to domestic instability, the Chinese government has long been preoccupied with maintaining self-sufficiency in grain production. Now that China increasingly relies on food imports, some observers claim that the debate over GM food in China is really about the preference for developing an indigenous GM capability to ensure food security and depend less on imports, rather than a reflection of over food safety risks from GM foods.

In the paper I outline the risk discourses by different groups of actors on GM foods in China and draw conclusions about their intent. I argue that while some officials and members are the public are concerned about food safety, increasingly the debate over GM foods is about food security, reducing reliance on Western food suppliers, and developing domestic GM capabilities.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Morrell, Erica. "Where are First Foods in Food Justice? A Field Analysis of Infant Foods and Feeding" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1253042_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Why are first foods—especially breast milk and infant formula—largely absent from most American food justice efforts? In this paper, I draw on Bourdieu’s ‘field’ concept and Feminist Political Ecology to answer this question. I show that in the US, first foods have been situated within differing fields. Prior to the 18th century, first foods were situated in what I refer to as a ‘social good’ field. In the 18th and 19th century, they were re-situated in a ‘domestic’ field. In the 20th century, first foods were again re-situated, first in a ‘science’ field and then ‘public health’ one. I argue that these field positionings have distanced first foods from their broader food systems significance, which helps explain why food justice has yet to adequately regard infant foods and feeding. Yet I demonstrate that each of these various field positionings have shaped and been shaped by oppressive notions among America’s dominant class with regards to gender, the body, and nature, among other issues. While these field positionings have helped distance first foods from food justice discourse and action, they are also thus precisely why food justice efforts must pay closer attention to them. Initiatives are emerging to re-situate first foods yet again, this time in a ‘food systems’ field. If successful, this may facilitate first foods in becoming a central food justice topic towards creating more equitable conditions for all.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
5. DeLong, Alia., Moore, Kelly., Swisher, Marilyn. and Smith, Suzanna. "It's Food Security versus Food Structure: Class Discrimination at Food Assistance Agencies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1254888_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Food insecurity is no longer a phenomena reserved for undeveloped or underdeveloped countries. It has become more prevalent in the United States since the UN declared the right to food a human right in 1948. One particularly vulnerable population is mothers. This research addressed the need to better understand how mothers responsible for feeding children deal with food insecurity. This research addressed relationships between food insecure mothers and institutional aid, specifically food assistance agencies. This research used semi-structured interviews to gain an in-depth understanding of women’s experiences. Results indicated that class discrimination plays a major role in predicting institutional trust and greater food security. Other contributing factors discussed are institutional prejudice and aid dependence. Future research should focus on the intersection between class and race for food insecure women who receive food assistance.

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