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2012 - Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies 44th Annual Convention Words: 72 words || 
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1. Syvarth, Kristina. "Performing Foolishness: Daniil Kharms’ Life-art Performances and the Avant-garde" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Slavic, East European and Eurasian Studies 44th Annual Convention, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p567285_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper will examine the performative aspects of Daniil Kharms' work and life, specifically within the context of the avant-garde and the avant-garde's concept of "life art." It will not only draw on the influences of the avant-garde (especially Russian Futurism) to situate Kharms' work, but will also look towards the Russian tradition of the Holy Fool in order to better understand the spiritual or metaphysical aspects of Kharms' work and worldview.

2018 - 14th Annual International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 149 words || 
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2. Gray, Julia. "An aesthetic of relationality: embracing the embodied, imaginative and foolish possibilities of performance-research" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 14th Annual International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 16, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1370327_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An aesthetic of relationality is a conceptual frame that responds to calls for more for “more thoroughly theorized and critically-threaded approaches” to arts-based research (Harris, Hunter, & Hall, 2015, p. 1) that help us “unsettle traditional concepts of what counts as research . . . [and] as legitimate inquiry” (Denzin, 2017, p. 8). Drawing on the example of the research-informed play ‘Cracked: new light on dementia,’ of which I am the playwright and director, I will explicate an aesthetic of relationality as an aesthetic space within which the embodied, interpretive work of performance-based artist-researchers is extended into spatial, relational contexts. This includes three interrelated modes of practice, or the ways they engage in their practice: playful extending, foolish disrupting, and inventive disrupting. I will additionally discuss implications of this theoretical framework for a new critical inquiry that embraces imaginative, “foolish,” participatory, and active possibilities of engagement.

2016 - The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America Words: 116 words || 
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3. Kircher, Timothy. ""Better a witty fool than a foolish wit": Humanist Word Games and Other Sports" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 62nd Annual Meeting of the Renaissance Society of America, Park Plaza Hotel and Hynes Convention Center, Boston, MA, <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1049972_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The paper examines contests staged in Quattrocento humanist writings, in order to discover the philosophical dimension of these games. Using examples from Poggio Bracciolini (Facetiae) and Leon Battista Alberti (Della famiglia, Momus), it showcases the sense of a creative playing field, in which participants challenge one another in verbal jousting. These exchanges often occur on the level of competing linguistic registers, high and low, within the same idiom. Besides contributing to the contemporary language debates, the verbal contests demonstrate how play is a feature of humanist philosophizing, with the homo ludens, to use Johan Huizinga’s term, on central stage. Testing the tensile strength of language and culture, these serious games anticipate the investigations of sixteenth-century humanists.

2012 - ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars Words: 327 words || 
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4. Lierse, Sharon. "Teaching Instruments Out of Your Comfort Zone: Are We Fearless or Foolish?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISME World Conference and Commission Seminars, Thessaloniki Concert Hall, Thessaloniki, Greece, Jul 15, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p547662_index.html>
Publication Type: Spoken Paper (Abstract)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Instrumental music teachers are often perceived as educators who have the knowledge and expertise to teach more than their instrument of specialty. To an outsider, a clarinet and saxophone are very similar just as a piano is to a pipe organ. The skills required to play and teach these instruments do overlap. Often instrumental music teachers are required to teach outside their domain or comfort zone, be it geographic location, demand and supply of instruments or for financial reasons. However, are we doing a disservice to ourselves, the students, and to the music education profession? At what stage can an instrumental music teacher claim that they have the know how to teach another instrument to an adequate level?
These questions have arisen after working as a lecturer at an educational university where due to staff shortages in the less common orchestral instruments, I have become the specialist by ‘default’. This is for purely practical purposes and for the university to maintain a balance of instrument types in their flagship ensembles. There have been challenges especially when instruments do not work properly. Initially, prior to each lesson, there was a feeling of trepidation and dread. The anxiety of a student asking something I did not know or the student becoming more advanced than the knowledge I had to give.
Tertiary music institutions have the task of educating students so that they have a level of competence in a musical instrument. There is the dilemma that focusing on one instrument to the exclusion of others will not adequately prepare them for a life-long career in music. Adversely, teaching them basic skills in a wide range of instruments creates a ‘jack of all trades but a master of none’.
The paper is a discussion of the issues faced by instrumental music educators when teaching out of their comfort zone. What approaches and strategies can be taken by the music educator to ensure that there is a positive experience for all involved.

2016 - ASEEES Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Flory, Mark. "Holy Foolishness Illumined: On the Role of the Holy Fool in the Context of the Phenomenology of Enlightened Consciousness" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Washington Marriott Wardman Park, Washington, DC, Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1138806_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper presents a brief phenomenological account of enlightened consciousness (according to the Hesychastic tradition, but with reference to other forms of spiritual practice and meditation), and places the Holy Fool within the context of the transformative practices that result in enlightenment. I will argue that Holy Foolishness is an expression of the reintegrative moment of theosis, in which the enlightened person, by going beyond all norms (of consciousness, of morality, of society), becomes a conduit of God’s grace and transformation. The transformational and liberative potentiality of Holy Foolishness is found in this reintegrative moment. The Holy Fool presents a possible solution to the age-old problem of the relationship between personal salvation and social amelioration: neither is absolutely “prior” to the other; rather, they are mutually sustaining and transforming. Holy Fools, in this regard, provide us with one of the supreme examples of the transformative, incarnational grace of God at work.

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