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2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 27 pages || Words: 10110 words || 
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1. Milward, Marie. "Taking on the European Challenge to Foreign Policy: a Foreign Policy Analysis of the EU Foreign Policy in the Democratic Republic of Congo" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p252126_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Is there such a thing as Common European Foreign Policy? In evaluating European Foreign Policy (EFP), it is important to take into account that EFP is made by the institutions of the EU as well as the institutions of the member states. Recent conceptualizations of foreign policy analysis have focused on actor-specific theories, are best suited for explaining EFP. This paper analyzes the case of the European democracy promotion policies toward the Democratic Republic of Congo. Since the beginning of the 1990s the African Great Lakes region has been the target of continued involvement on the part of the European Union as a whole as well as some of its member states. Drawing on James Rosenau's framework, this paper seeks to demonstrate how and when different actors influence the initiation and implementation phases of foreign policy making. Within the analysis of each stage, this paper mainly focuses on comparing the respective role and influence of the institutions of the member states as well as the institutions of the EU. The analysis of the case presented in this paper illustrates the extent to which each of these actors is relevant to the making of foreign policy and whether or not it is justified to talk about a Common European Foreign Policy and what we mean by this.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 23 pages || Words: 5804 words || 
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2. Kuramoto, Yukiko. "Japan?s Foreign Aid Policy as a Vital Foreign Policy: Did Japan Achieve Its National Interests?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p181297_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Between 1989 and 2000, Japan was the largest foreign aid donor in the world. Meanwhile, Japanese Official Development Assistance (ODA) had played a prominent role in Japan’s foreign policy. Yet public recognition of Japan’s ODA as a critical foreign policy tool seems low, and the effectiveness of this foreign policy is uncertain. Therefore, this paper analyzes Japan’s national interests and how Japan’s foreign aid attained its foreign policy goals. First, Japanese national interests will be examined by content analysis using white papers prepared by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Second, it surveys Japan’s foreign aid policy as a foreign policy tool. Third, this study attempts to assess if Japan’s national interests were achieved while Japan was one of the largest ODA donors in the world. Quantitative studies reveal whether Japan’s ODA provided positive impact on Japanese economic, diplomatic, and security interests. Finally, the research findings suggest how Japan should define and formulate its foreign aid policy as a foreign policy tool in the future.

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 250 words || 
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3. Rosner, Yotam. and Auerbach, Yehudith. "Foreign Policy in Times of Crisis: An Analysis of US, Britain, Germany and France foreign policy regarding the events of the Arab Spring in the years 2010- 2012" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1241939_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One of the fundamental questions in the field of foreign policy analysis (FPA) is why certain nations choose cooperative approaches to promote their goals in the international arena, while other nations prefer aggressive approaches. Previous research provides a number of explanations to this phenomenon: leader’s beliefs, internal politics and balance of power in the international system. Despite the lengthy discourse over this issue there has been a lack of a comprehensive model incorporating all these variables of different levels of analysis. The current research addresses these issue by examining the foreign policy behaviors of the United States, Britain, Germany and France regarding the events of the Arab Spring in the years 2010– 2012. The independent variables are belief system (Operational Code) of four heads of the discussed states (Obama, Cameron, Merkel & Sarkozy) and the political constraints they are facing in both the domestic and international arenas. The leaders' Operational Codes are gathered from their public speeches and analyzed using VICS (Verbs In-Context Analysis) method. The data concerning the political constraints (domestic and international) is collected from online newspapers. The dependent variable - the foreign policy behavior of the four analyzed nations - was aggregated from online media to WEIS events data, and then coded into a continuous time series representing conflict or cooperation between the discussed nations and the countries affected by the Arab spring. The initial findings indicate that Germany conducted the most cooperative foreign policy (1.83), followed by the UK (0.85), France (0.38) and USA (0.34).

2017 - Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology Words: 227 words || 
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4. Marsden, Sarah. "Fighting in Foreign Lands: Narrative Identity and Political Imagination in ‘Foreign Fighters’’ Life Histories" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1252915_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Combatants’ perspectives on the long term impact of conflict rarely feature in work on political violence. Existing literature tends to emphasise questions of mobilization, strategy, and organisation rather than lived experience. Hence, although increasingly urgent questions are being asked about returning ‘foreign fighters’, knowledge about the effects and experience of involvement in transnational conflict remains weak. This paper draws on the life history accounts of a small number of ‘foreign fighters’ who took part in jihad over the last 30 years; from Afghanistan in the 1990s to Libya in 2011. Former combatants’ life histories offer a rich source of material by which to understand why people move away from violence, what involvement in conflict means to them, and how these experiences influence the pattern of their lives. In exploring these issues with a focus on individual processes of sense-making, the paper examines what informs post-conflict trajectories. It does so by interpreting accounts of narrative identity in the context of wider collective political, religious, and ideological narratives, and in relation to the political imagination reflected in their life histories. Based on interviews with ‘foreign fighters’ involved in jihad this paper offers a rich, qualitative account of their memories of becoming involved, how disengagement and reintegration are subjectively experienced and recalled, what the longer-term biographical effects of involvement in political violence are, and how current selves interpret former selves.

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