Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 5,142 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1029 - Next  Jump:
2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 27 pages || Words: 10110 words || 
Info
1. Milward, Marie. "Taking on the European Challenge to Foreign Policy: a Foreign Policy Analysis of the EU Foreign Policy in the Democratic Republic of Congo" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p252126_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Is there such a thing as Common European Foreign Policy? In evaluating European Foreign Policy (EFP), it is important to take into account that EFP is made by the institutions of the EU as well as the institutions of the member states. Recent conceptualizations of foreign policy analysis have focused on actor-specific theories, are best suited for explaining EFP. This paper analyzes the case of the European democracy promotion policies toward the Democratic Republic of Congo. Since the beginning of the 1990s the African Great Lakes region has been the target of continued involvement on the part of the European Union as a whole as well as some of its member states. Drawing on James Rosenau's framework, this paper seeks to demonstrate how and when different actors influence the initiation and implementation phases of foreign policy making. Within the analysis of each stage, this paper mainly focuses on comparing the respective role and influence of the institutions of the member states as well as the institutions of the EU. The analysis of the case presented in this paper illustrates the extent to which each of these actors is relevant to the making of foreign policy and whether or not it is justified to talk about a Common European Foreign Policy and what we mean by this.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Words: 151 words || 
Info
2. Villalobos, Jose. "Presidential Foreign Policymaking Success in Congress: Assessing the Role of Agency Input for Foreign Policy Proposal Passage" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p252079_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In foreign policy studies, scholars often overlook how organizational management of the executive bureaucracy affects presidential foreign policymaking. This paper explores how agency input, primarily that of the National Security Council (NSC), affects presidential foreign policymaking success in Congress. Blending studies on presidential foreign policymaking with the knowledge and theories of studies regarding presidential management, signaling, and bureaucratic policymaking research, I argue that agency input provides presidents with agency support and neutral competence as they develop their foreign policy proposals and submit them to Congress for consideration. Agency support denotes agreement between presidential and agency views on a foreign policy proposal, and neutral competence signifies a measure of objectivity (i.e. legitimacy) and, to varying degrees, expertise. Thus, I argue that agency input provides presidential foreign policy proposals with a measure of transparency and cooperation that encourages members of Congress to view a proposal more positively, which aids their passage into law.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 27 pages || Words: 10171 words || 
Info
3. Holland, Jack. "Coalition foreign policy in the ‘War on Terror’: A framework for analysing foreign policy as culturally embedded discourse" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p252537_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Building on O’Tuathail’s call for theoretical and conceptual clarity, this paper develops a framework for analysing foreign policy as culturally embedded discourse. In order to conceptualise the nature of ‘embeddedness’, O’Tuathail’s framework is developed in four stages. Firstly, building on Doty, it is argued that asking ‘how possible?’ must be split into ‘how thinkable?’ and ‘how sold?’ in order to encapsulate the circular, processual and recursive nature of foreign policy. Secondly, to understand the agency of foreign policy practitioners, within this circular framework, Jessop and Hay’s strategic-relational approach is used to overcome the structure-agency dualism prevalent in existing accounts. Thirdly, within a structural-relational understanding, Barnett’s notion of framing is introduced to encapsulate the way in which practitioners act strategically to sculpt a foreign policy discourse that will maximise resonance by plugging into foreign policy culture. Fourthly, when dealing with the dynamic political landscapes of democratic coalition states, it is imperative to consider for whom foreign policy is framed. Analysing foreign policy as culturally embedded discourse, this framework enables a comparative analysis of coalition foreign policy in the ‘War on Terror’.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 23 pages || Words: 5804 words || 
Info
4. Kuramoto, Yukiko. "Japan?s Foreign Aid Policy as a Vital Foreign Policy: Did Japan Achieve Its National Interests?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-01-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p181297_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Between 1989 and 2000, Japan was the largest foreign aid donor in the world. Meanwhile, Japanese Official Development Assistance (ODA) had played a prominent role in Japan’s foreign policy. Yet public recognition of Japan’s ODA as a critical foreign policy tool seems low, and the effectiveness of this foreign policy is uncertain. Therefore, this paper analyzes Japan’s national interests and how Japan’s foreign aid attained its foreign policy goals. First, Japanese national interests will be examined by content analysis using white papers prepared by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Second, it surveys Japan’s foreign aid policy as a foreign policy tool. Third, this study attempts to assess if Japan’s national interests were achieved while Japan was one of the largest ODA donors in the world. Quantitative studies reveal whether Japan’s ODA provided positive impact on Japanese economic, diplomatic, and security interests. Finally, the research findings suggest how Japan should define and formulate its foreign aid policy as a foreign policy tool in the future.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 1029 - Next  Jump:

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy