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2007 - Mathematical Association of America Words: 348 words || 
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1. SCHIFFMAN, JAY. "Fortunate and Lesser Fortunate Numbers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Mathematical Association of America, The Fairmont Hotel, San Jose, CA, Aug 03, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p204470_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Reo Franklin Fortune (1903-1979) was a social anthropologist at Cambridge University and in 1941 joined the faculty at The University of Toronto. From 1928-1935, Fortune was married to social scientist Margaret Mead. What is surprising to many anthropologists was Fortune's role in the study of prime numbers. In Euclid's classical proof on the infinitude of the primes, one is exposed to the quantity MATHEMATICA calls $euclid(n)$ which represents the the product of the first n primes plus one. Hence $euclid(4) = 2 * 3 * 5 * 7 + 1 = 211$. It is unknown if there are finitely or infinitely many prime outputs for this function. Fortune considered the mapping from the natural numbers N into N defined by $f(n) = Next Prime(euclid(n)) - euclid(n) + 1$. To cite an example, the next prime after $euclid(4) = 211$ is 223 and $223 - 211 + 1 =13$ is prime. Fortune conjectured that all outputs for this mapping generated primes. In 1994, Richard Guy confirmed the truth of the Fortune Conjecture through n = 100 and Eric Weisstein of Wolfram Research, Inc. on November 17, 2003 verified the truth through n = 1000. With the aid of MATHEMATICA, I have confirmed the conjecture through n = 1900 and T.D. Noe through n = 2000. Analogous to the Fortune Numbers is a set dubbed as the Lesser Fortunate Numbers in which we consider the mapping from N into N defined by $f(n) = (euclid(n) - 2) - Previous Prime(euclid(n) - 2) + 1$. To cite an example, $euclid(4) - 2 = 209 and Previous Prime (209) = 199$. Thus the prime output of 11 occurs here. It has been conjectured that these numbers are likewise always prime. I have verified the truth of this conjecture through n =1200 and T.D. Noe through n = 1900. In this paper, a line plot for each mapping along with an analysis of the data will be furnished. While no new ground is broken, these numbers serve as an appealing excursion as well as extension to Euclid's genius over two thousand years ago.

2006 - International Studies Association Pages: 46 pages || Words: 18111 words || 
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2. Datz, Giselle. "Crisis and Reversal of Fortune? Sovereign Default, Debt Restructuring, and Economic Performance in Argentina" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p98592_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Relations between creditors and debtors have been at the core of the North-South divide throughout modern history. World inequality is at once mediated and perpetuated by financial relations between borrowers and lenders. Although much has been said about debt crises in Latin America and their political consequences, sovereign defaults have rarely been examined as political decisions. On the one hand, the costs of default have generally been overestimated in economists? reputational studies. On the other hand, debtors? restructuring strategies have been underestimated in the face of anticipated constraints on developing countries? policy autonomy believed to flow from financial globalization. Despite the increasing reliance of middle-income developing countries on borrowing through the issuance of bonds?rather than commercial bank lending as in the 1970s and 1980s?defaults are still happening. This presents a puzzle with regard to the assumed limited policy autonomy of governments in emerging markets in going against market preferences.Debt restructuring processes in the 1990s and early 2000s have involved often considerable debt discounts to private creditors, both foreign and domestic, followed by vigorous economic growth. This paper presents an explanation for this puzzle by analyzing default and debt restructuring through a framework that highlights the heterogeneity of creditors and their dynamic strategies in a post-default scenario, as well as debtor governments? reactions to these strategies. By focusing on the Argentine default of 2001 and debt restructuring (the largest and most complex in history to date) in 2005, I find that: (1) sovereign debt repayment is much less contingent on reputations, as economic theory would have it, and much more linked to the short-term nature of financial incentives in the bond industry, which are the most crucial determinant of the return of credit to defaulting countries and are based on snap shots of credibility rather than historic repayment records; and (2) governments have more room to maneuver in developing contentious policy measures in general?and debt restructuring terms in particular?than the globalization literature has so far indicated.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 32 words || 
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3. Pushkar, P.. "Religious Parties in India and Pakistan: The Contrasting Political Fortunes of the BJP in India and the Jama?at-I Islami in Pakistan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p86877_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this paper, we ask two questions: 1) Why are some religious parties more successful than others in coming to power? 2) Are moderate religious parties more successful than extremist parties?

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 13 pages || Words: 6067 words || 
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4. Hammond, Michael. "Reversal of Fortune: How Evolutionary Adaptations to Limit Inequality Become Fuel for Inflated Inequality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p241374_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Evolutionary adaptations that limited the expansion of inequality in our context of origin as nomadic foragers have a reverse impact with our exodus from that context. These very same adaptations come to fuel the escalation of inequality in a number of ways. By preconsciously limiting the appeal of repeated status arousers, individuals are sent off in the pursuit of a variety of status distinctions. Initially, the only variety available in sufficient numbers was with packages of moderate distinctions. However, with the post-exodus explosion of status arousers, these preconscious repetition limitations were overwhelmed, and attention could turn to creating bundles of high contrast inequality. Understanding this reverse impact increases the depth of analysis of the social evolution of inequality across our history.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 7965 words || 
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5. Kim, Daejoong., Nam, Yoonjae. and Kang, Sinuk. "An Examination of the Social Partnership Links between the Web Sites of Fortune 500 Companies and Environmental Organizations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p425126_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines hyperlinks in the environmental section of the corporate web sites of Fortune global 500. Results show that Asian companies are less likely to maintain partnership with environmental organizations than North-American and Western European companies. While companies are more likely to maintain partnership with non-profit environmental organizations than government or intergovernmental agencies, a hyperlink network analysis reveals that government or intergovernmental agencies play a central role in social partnership.

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