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2019 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 16755 words || 
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1. Johnson, Brett. and Epping, Shane. "Forum Delegation: The Birth and Transposition of a New Approach to Public Forum Doctrine" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Canada, Aug 07, 2019 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1553529_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores the concept of forum delegation: the power of government officials to suggest which forums to allow speakers to use. The concept is born out of a recent legal battle between the University of Minnesota and conservative speaker Ben Shapiro, in which the UMN required Shapiro to speak in a venue away from the heart of campus due to concerns over the school’s ability to provide adequate security for the event. The paper first analyzes the UMN case to assess the constitutionality of forum delegation in the context of regulating speech and public universities. Next, it applies Robert Post’s theory of constitutional domains to transpose forum delegation from the public university context to situations in which cities must deal with controversial speakers. The goal in explicating the concept of forum delegation within this latter context to is give cities a tool in which to constitutionally balance the interests of speakers, audience members, public safety concerns, and efficient resource management. Such a tool can be especially helpful at a time when provocateurs have sought to weaponize the First Amendment through politicizing and polarizing free speech principles.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 6873 words || 
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2. Smith, Jackie., Karides, Marina., Becker, Marc., Brunelle, Dorval., Chase-Dunn, Christopher., della Porta, Donatella., Icaza, Rosalba., Juris, Jeffrey., Mosca, Lorenzo., Reese, Ellen., Smith, Peter. and Vaszuez, Rolando. "The World Social Forums and the Challenges of Global Democracy (With updates on the Recent U.S. Social Forum)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p177724_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since 2001, the World Social Forum has become a space and a process where diverse movements and groups promoting alternatives to corporate-led globalization have come together to clarify their collective aims and identities and to forge new transnational partnerships. Despite the wide variety of groups and interests, there is a common call for a more democratic and equitable global order. The popularity of the WSF, as well as its rapid growth and expansion to regional and more localized settings, demonstrates its importance in contemporary global politics. But the WSF process is--just like the civil societies of which it is comprised—fraught with tensions and uncertainty as well as possibility. The social forum process is truly a new form of political participation with important implications for global democratization. In this paper we identify four main axes of tension that have stimulated debate within the WSF process: namely, its form as an open space or an actor; as a proponent of radical or reformist change; as a space solely for civil society or for a multiplicity of actors; and as existing primarily in global or local contexts. These tensions, we argue, encourage constant reflection and self-awareness among activists, sensitizing them to how inequalities impact democratic politics and to the ambiguities and uncertainties inherent in democracy. This has helped the WSF process evolve in ways that make it more effective as a vehicle for global democratization. Finally, conclude by considering how the WSF has been manifested in the United States at the recent U.S. Social Forum (to be held in Atlanta June 27-July 1, 2007).

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 30 pages || Words: 8320 words || 
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3. Chae, Young-Gil. "An Aspect of the Culture of the Public Sphere in U.S.: The Analysis of Online Public Forums in Local Online Newspapers." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p13770_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The field of communication tends to consider the concept of public sphere as a source for the democratic process within a society. However, the pragmatic attitude about the concept should be incorporated with the understanding of the conditions of the public sphere in the society since the clarification of the concept requires “a systematic comprehension of our own society” (Habermas, 1962, p.5). Current study, thus, aims to understand the social conditions and the culture of the public sphere in U.S. through the analysis of the online public forums in twenty-five local online newspapers. In addition to the identification of three aspects of the online forum, we explore to describe the forms and uses of the online forums in the local online newspapers across U.S. Findings of the study show that the forms and uses of the online forums in the local newspapers might be shaped by the institutional relations of the companies with their mother-corporations. In addition, the analysis also indicates that the forms and uses of the forum might be characterized as closed structures of the forums constraining user participation.

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 38 pages || Words: 10247 words || 
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4. Yum, Young-ok., Procter, David. and Schenck-Hamlin, William. "Facilitated Discussion Forums, Campaign Attitudes, and Trust: The Role of DebateWatch During the 2004 Presidential/Vice-Presidential Debates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p91467_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The present study investigated the extent to which the public expresses disaffection and support for the 2004 U.S. Presidential debates and moderated post-debate discussion forums, and the extent to which generalized trust had an effect on campaign disaffection and support. The respondents of the survey were 100 participants in DebateWatch 2004. The findings from the present study were mixed in that: (1) people preferred moderated discussion forums to presidential campaign discourse, (2) moderated discussion forums, if employed effectively, could help alleviate public’s cynicism toward political processes and enhance confidence in the political system, and (3) trust was not found to be a reliable determinant of political attitudes. The insignificant differences in political attitudes as a function of trust were surprising; however, it might not be entirely unexpected considering DebateWatch participants on average were rated high in trust and therefore creating realistically high and low trust groups was impossible. In addition, the findings may suggest that more dimensions of trust than benevolence and reliability need to be considered in order to accurately reflect political cynicism.

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