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2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 36 pages || Words: 15763 words || 
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1. Tiberghien, Yves. "Global Forces, Political Mediation, and the Fragmentation of Corporate Governance Patterns: The Cases of France, Japan, and Korea" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p59863_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper analyzes pathways of corporate governance reforms since 1995 in three state-coordinated systems: France, Japan, and Korea. Observing a process of fragmentation within established types of capitalist systems and within national models, it focuses on root causes of this fragmentation process.
In contrast to explanations rooted in coalitional politics or partisan politics, the paper advances the concept of political mediation of external forces. It identifies global codes and global equity markets as the key external forces. These external forces are not sufficient to push for corporate governance change, given the centrality of national politics. Corporate governance reforms in state-coordinated systems follow four possible pathways: political entrepreneurship, bureaucratic mediation, institutional boomerang, or mediation through non-profit organizations and proxy agencies. The paper provides both quantitative data and process-tracing of selected reforms in all three countries.

2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 28 pages || Words: 8547 words || 
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2. Anner, Mark. "Between Solidarity and Fragmentation: Labor Responses to Economic Globalization in the Americas" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p59661_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores labor responses to international production outsourcing in Latin America. The author analyzes the tendency of some labor groups to develop broad national and transnational social alliances to pursue their claims, while other groups fragmented and developed close relations with management on a plant level. The author argues that industrial structure, national labor relations regimes, and labor ideologies shape four forms of labor responses: transnational activist networks, transnational labor networks, microcorporatism, and clientelism. Field research for this paper was conducted in El Salvador, Honduras, Brazil, and Argentina.

2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 42 pages || Words: 12002 words || 
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3. Knack, Stephen. "Donor Fragmentation and Bureaucratic Quality in Aid Recipients" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p40420_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We analyze the impact of donor fragmentation on the quality of government bureaucracy in aid-recipient nations. A formal model of a donor’s decision to hire government administrators to manage donor-funded projects predicts that the number of administrators hired declines as the donor’s share of other projects in the country increases, and as the donor’s concern for the success of other donors’ projects increases. These hypotheses are supported by cross-country empirical tests, using an index of bureaucratic quality available for aid-recipient nations over the 1982-2001 period.

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 42 pages || Words: 12894 words || 
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4. Trochev, Alexei. "Fragmentation? Defection? Legitimacy? Explaining Judicial Behavior in Post-Communist "Colored Revolutions"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152766_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: Georgia, Ukraine and Kyrgyzstan are the only post-Soviet states that underwent “colored revolutions” between 2003 and 2005,1 mass protests, which toppled incumbent governments. One factor that appears of central importance but has so far received little attention is the unique role assumed by the courts in supporting the process of these revolutions. In addition to street protests, the political opposition actively used litigation to expose vote fraud and annul election results. Unexpectedly, Constitutional Courts in Georgia and Ukraine, often heralded as champions of the rule of law and democratic values, had little or no role at all in these revolutions. Unexpectedly, Supreme Courts, which are staffed with Soviet-era judges recruited and trained through the same system, cancelled rigged elections, thus opening the way for a peaceful change of government.

2004 - American Sociological Association Pages: 17 pages || Words: 4497 words || 
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5. Kudler, T. "Are We Living Civil Religion?: Connecting and Making Meaning in a Fragmented Society" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p110304_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Bellah’s initial thesis of civil religion proposed an America socially integrated through widely institutionalized symbols, beliefs and rituals reflective of a universal religious reality embodying the American experience. In this paper, I will formally layout Bellah’s thesis and demonstrate the impact of civil religion on the last 30 years of research in the sociology of religion. I will draw upon discussions of religion and modernity to show how social differentiation and the loss of faith in institutions leads to desires for more meaningful personal experiences. I will focus on today’s global society, outlining the current process of “de-differentiation” or “deprivatization” as exemplified through empirical work on health, intermarriage and the small group movement. Then I will look at the rise of the counterculture as a revolt against civil religion. Ultimately, arguing that in our increasingly fragmented and global society, a renewed need to define a shared present exists. Insofar as a civil religion can come to embody global religious and political meaning, it will be a useful concept today.

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