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2008 - WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION Pages: 32 pages || Words: 9620 words || 
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1. Buccola, Nicholas. "The Civic Liberalism of Frederick Douglass" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the WESTERN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION, Manchester Hyatt, San Diego, California, Mar 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p238226_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 40 pages || Words: 11064 words || 
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2. Waymer, Damion. and Heath, Robert. "Non-profit Activist Public Relations and the Paradox of the Positive: A Case Study of Frederick Douglass’ “Fourth of July Address”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p185295_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The paper’s purpose is to build upon and advance the discussion of non-profit public relations especially that associated with activism. It examined the strategic positioning and messaging of one event during the 19th Century anti-slavery movement in the United States. The various elements of that movement challenged the status quo position on slavery and racial discrimination. It included events such as Frederick Douglass’ Fourth of July Oration. It was one of many instances that anti-slavery communicators worked with to create strain by pointing to a legitimacy gap between hallowed values and the application of those values to the lives and conditions of people living and working in the United States.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 108 words || 
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3. Harder, Joseph. and Reinhardt, Teresa. "Between Order and Liberation:Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass,and the Problem of Civil Religion." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p362890_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper is an analysis of Abraham Lincoln's and Frederick Douglass' contrasting approaches to "Civic theology",as exemplifed by Lincoln's youthful "Perpetuation Speech" ( 1837),and Douglass' "What is the Fourth of July to a Slave?"(1854). I argue that Lincoln's speech exemplifies an " theology of order", which is deeply conservative. In contrast, Douglass' speech exemplifies a "theology of Liberation" which is profoundly radical. I conclude my paper by arguing that Lincoln the president transcended the dichotmy between the theology of Order and the theology of liberation in The Second Inaugural. I also argue that Lincoln's cvic theology,at its highest, exemplified the "Augustinian Liberalism" defended by Paul Weithman and others.

2009 - 33rd Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 412 words || 
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4. Gibson, III, Ernest. ""Where Are My Kinsmen? The Trope of Loneliness in Coopers' The Last of the Mohicans and Douglass' Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 33rd Annual National Council for Black Studies, Renaissance Atlanta Hotel Downtown, Atlanta, GA, Mar 19, 2009 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p302289_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Nineteenth century America represented a young nation struggling with a “social” problem heavily grounded in race. By mid-century, these “United” states are divided into warring entities slightly held together by an economic and international need for one another. Yet, this warring time captured America’s historical and contemporary preoccupation – freedom. Writers of the time studied/felt this American dilemma, and scripted the internal conflict of a nation coming to terms with a history of injustices and crimes against humanity. Two writers in particular, understood America’s trek towards freedom and despite writing from two distinct racial groups, two different literary genres and two distinguished time periods, are subtextually linked in their treatment of freedom. One of these writers, James Fennimore Cooper, is noted as being one of America’s first novelists, and his historical novel The Last of the Mohicans narrates a powerful wrestling with the concept of freedom. The other writer, Frederick Douglass, is known for being the autodidactic ex-slave whose acquisition of literacy fueled his individual migration to be free, while his Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave became a literary icon in American literature. A discussion of these two members of the American literati needs explanation, as their differences are too large to ignore. Cooper a white writer from the north writes historical fiction in 1826, whereas his contrast, Douglass a “Negro” ex-slave from the south writes in the genre of “narrative” in 1845. However, the racial, geographic and temporal distinctions of these men are not enough to disconnect how they similarly chronicle the individual’s departure from slavery. Their works both highlight how when a “man” leaves the structure or institution of slavery (that is to say, leaves “his” place of origin), “he” inevitably encounters a profound moment of loneliness where he can no longer claim the kinsmen he left behind. In an ironic paralleling of Cooper’s “Hawkeye” and Douglass’ “Self”, I argue that Cooper and Douglass record the loneliness that plagues one as “he” ascends from slavery. More importantly, juxtaposing how both writers treat this emotional moment of freedom, rewrites and revisions how America understands freedom. “Where Are My Kinsmen?: The Trope of Loneliness in Cooper’s The Last of the Mohicans and Douglass’ Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave offers a new way of understanding race, freedom and the nature of emotion in an America consistently at war with itself.

2010 - 95th Annual Convention Words: 346 words || 
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5. Wiggan, Greg. "First Black Presidents, Barack Obama and the Political Economy: A Comparative Analysis with Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p424385_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The issue of racial and ethnic equality has posed one of the most enduring challenges in the history of the United States. During the nineteenth-century, Frederick Douglass emerged as one of the most important black leaders and abolitionist. Douglass, a towering intellectual who was admired and supported by many white Americans, devoted his life to improving race relations and the social conditions of African Americans. However, in spite of Douglass’ work, racial and ethnic Apartheid persisted in the United States and this was most evident to non-whites. At the turn of the twentieth-century, W. E. B. Du Bois argued that the “problem of the color line” was the most serious threat to the notion of an American democracy. During this time, Booker T. Washington succeeded Frederick Douglass and was symbolically anointed as the “first President of black America,” an honor bestowed upon him by mainstream press, northern philanthropic foundations, many white Americans and even some African Americans. During the early twentieth-century, Washington, the politician, educator, strategist and “black President;” was the most important black leader in America. Although at times he was misunderstood and often forced into compromising decision-making, as “President,” Washington used his popularity, power and resources to create new opportunities for African Americans. This paper proposes that a century later, the historicity surrounding the Presidency of Barack Obama, is both a continuation and a culmination of the work done by previous generations and historic black leaders. It further argues that Obama’s presidency symbolically reflects how far the nation has come in improving racial and ethnic relations, and how much more work it needs to accomplish. The paper explores the lives and contributions of Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington and Barack Obama in relation to the political economy. While synthesizing and contrasting the work of these three popular black figures, the findings reveal social and political strategies and contradictions, as each leader, particularity Washington and Obama; attempt to simultaneously improve race relations and the democratic process at home and abroad; while meeting the expectations of special interest groups and while preserving the hegemonic capitalist empire.

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