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2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 5059 words || 
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1. Chao, Wen-Yu. "Negotiated Freedom: A Discussion of Chinese Government’s Attempts to Restrict Freedom of Speech on the Internet" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p427253_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the current state of the speech of freedom in Chinese cyberspace by drawing theoretical framework from different disciplines. The phenomenological observations are: 1) Internet users in China post traditionally considered taboos, challenging society in general to re-think cultural values, 2) people try to find a common ground that allows them to express their ideas as well as maintaining social stability., and 3) ideologies dominates current Chinese cyberspace.

2012 - 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 347 words || 
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2. Swain, Ayanna. "“We Who Believe in Freedom Cannot Rest”: A Life History Exploration of Teachers in an African-centered Freedom School" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 36th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Mar 07, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p560880_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: African descent students often are subjected to pedagogical practices and curricula that do not validate their home cultures or their individual and collective histories. In response to this problem, many teachers implement culturally relevant pedagogy and curricula to address the needs of this population. Focusing on two African descent teachers in an African-centered school, the purpose of this African-centered qualitative inquiry was 1) to examine how the ancient Kemetic philosophy, Ma’at, manifests in these teachers’ epistemologies, worldviews, and pedagogical practices, 2) to explore how these teachers’ epistemologies and worldviews inform their pedagogical practices, and 3) to understand how these teachers’ life experiences have shaped their epistemologies and worldviews. A holistic theoretical framework comprised of Afrocentric and womanist theories and a culturally relevant pedagogy theoretical approach informed the “retooled” life history methodology employed in this study. The culturally sensitive data collection methods included dialogue, storytelling, and participatory witnessing and a thematic narrative analysis technique was used to analyze the data. The significance of this study is fourfold. First, this study adds to the paucity of existing literature on exemplary African descent teachers by bringing to the fore how the epistemologies and worldviews of teachers shape their pedagogical practices in an African-centered school. Second, this study explores the intended liberatory effects of African descent teachers’ implementation of culturally relevant pedagogy for themselves and for their students, ultimately affecting how both groups position themselves in the broader society. Third, use of the cardinal virtues of Ma’at (truth, justice, righteousness, order, harmony, balance, and reciprocity) as the philosophical foundation for this study presents an ontological alternative to privileging western philosophical frameworks typically used in educational research. Finally, as the ancient Kemetic philosophy employed in this study and as this study’s philosophical foundation, Ma’at specifically encourages policy makers, researchers, and practitioners to reexamine their notions of contemporary education in terms of its purpose, methods, and conceptions of the whole child. The findings illuminate the ways in which Ma’at undergirds the participants’ epistemologies, worldviews, and culturally relevant pedagogical practices, enabling them to facilitate critical thinking, critical consciousness, and identity development with their students.

2014 - 38th Annual NCBS National Conference Words: 208 words || 
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3. Roberts, Christopher. "Africana Liberation Collision Theory to Africana Freedom(s): The Disciplinary Scaffolding and Architecture of a Model for Conceptualizing Africana Freedom(s)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 38th Annual NCBS National Conference, Miami Marriott Dadeland Hotel, Miami, Florida, <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p722137_index.html>
Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Abstract: Through a scholarly analysis of the literature in Africana Studies on trauma, healing, and African aesthetics interwoven with a re-interrogation of my thesis findings this work seeks to ground and re-operationalize Africana Liberation Collision Theory (ALCT) in the discipline of Africana Studies. ALCT is a theoretical framework that was introduced in my thesis (completed in the Spring of 2013) to analyze trauma and healing experienced by Africana youth in the Northern California Bay Area from a holistic Afrocentric perspective. Africana people experience trauma on what I argue are four levels: hegemonic, intergenerational, interpersonal, institutional. Therefore, the focus of this paper is the grounding of this iteration of ALCT in the discipline of Africana Studies. The objective of grounding ALCT in the discipline is that the form and function of the model, along with its attempt to encompass those four levels in a healing framework, will center Africana agency and perspective in a more liberatory manner. The disciplinary grounding of this framework will pay specific attention to ontological, epistemological, spiritual, and aesthetic conceptualizations of trauma and healing within various Africana knowledge bases. This paper is the presentation of the findings of the aforementioned process in the hope that this work contributes to our definitions, visions, and movements of freedom(s).

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 249 words || 
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4. Nguyen-Marshall, Van. "Press Freedom or Death: The Struggle for Transparency and Freedom of the Press in South Vietnam, 1972-1975" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1191514_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: As South Vietnamese President Nguyễn Văn Thiệu began clamping down on freedom of the press and of association in 1972, a movement for more transparency and rights emerged. Led by both the left-wing, anti-war opposition and the anti-communist intelligentsia, this movement first called for the repeal of Thiệu’s restrictive new laws, particularly the exacting Press Law 007. By 1974, however, this protest effort had exploded into a larger movement that demanded not only press freedom, but also an end to government corruption. Unique to this collective protest action was the prominent leadership of anti-communist Roman Catholic priests, such as Father Trần Hữu Thanh, erstwhile supporters of the regime. Father Thanh’s irreproachable anti-communist credentials created an awkward dilemma for Thiệu, who could not dismiss the priest as a communist sympathizer. Ironically, Hà Nội also found Father Thanh’s anti-government activities objectionable because his highly popular movement could undermine communist covert political work in South Vietnam. Labeled as reactionary by communist propaganda, Father Thanh’s movement reveals that, despite ideological differences, the two governments shared an intolerance for civil society.

By examining this protest struggle as it unfolded in the print media and later recounted in participants’ memoirs and interviews, my paper provides insight into the social and political dynamics of South Vietnam at a time when the United States was negotiating its way out of the war. Furthermore, the paper explores state-society relations and assesses the vitality of civil society and its ability to respond to both dictatorial state policies and wartime exigencies.

2014 - Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 149 words || 
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5. Golovátina-Mora, Polina. "Hunger Games to reality? A fear of freedom, or a fight for freedom?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Tenth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p719503_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper analyzes the popularity of “The Hunger Games” in the context of Fromm’s theory of individual development and social reality. I will look at the novel’s proposal regarding the relations between an individual and the society, how it is reflected in the movies, and the follow-up development of the theme on the HG Facebook page. I will address the questions as follows: Is it another message of the collective unconscious, as Jung and Fromm suggested, and the novel represents a literary response to the occupy movement as it already has been suggested on many occasions? If so, how far did it sink then in the conscious society? In order to answer that, I would like to compare the narrative of the novel with more populist exploration of the narrative, including the project of HG theme park in the context of recent global social events and recent vampire literature.

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