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2010 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 11510 words || 
Info
1. Khoo, Guan-Soon. "To Friend or Not To Friend? How Facebook Can Make My Friend Request Decisions More Efficient" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 21, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p402317_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Should I accept or reject this friendship gesture? Can Facebook assist users in making friend request decisions more efficient? Our study explores the psychological implications of Facebook users’ friend request negotiations based on interface cues. A 3x2x2 mixed design experiment (N=246) was conducted at a large east coast university campus. We hypothesized correlations between types of friend request information (i.e. number of friends, number of mutual friends and presence of mutual interest) and acceptance likelihood, with popularity and attractiveness, common ground, compatibility, and curiosity as mediators. Our findings indicate that number of friends and number of mutual friends are significant factors for acceptance likelihood, and that curiosity and common ground are mediators in the relationship between number of mutual friends and acceptance likelihood. The theoretical and practical implications of these relationships are discussed and recommendations for future research & Facebook design are offered.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 33 pages || Words: 8605 words || 
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2. Stevens Aubrey, Jennifer., Chattopadhyay, Sumana. and Rill, Lesile. "Are Facebook Friends Like Face-to-Face Friends: Investigating Relations Between the Use of Social Networking Websites and Social Capital" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p232185_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Research on the Internet’s impact on social capital has generally ignored its inherent sociability (Williams, 2006). In fact, the purpose of some of the most popular websites – such as Facebook and MySpace – is to increase one’s social network. Reporting the results of a survey of 507 undergraduates, this study finds that social networking use was positively associated with online bridging and bonding, but on the whole, these gains did not translate into offline contexts. Facebook intensity, defined as using relatively more of the social networking functions of the site, was associated with gains in offline bridging and bonding. In addition, being motivated to use social networking websites for their intended purpose – to stay connected to others – was positively associated offline social capital, but using them to bolster one’s public image was negatively associated with it. Discussion focuses on the implications of online social capital.

2010 - International Communication Association Pages: 2 pages || Words: 5 words || 
Info
3. Parks, Malcolm. "Who Are Facebook Friends? Exploring the Composition of Facebook Friend Networks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 21, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p404726_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The structure and impact of social networking sites (SNS) such as Facebook is determined by relationships among users, yet we know little about what those relationships are. This study advances a typology of 13 relationship categories derived from qualitative research and uses it to characterize 2,512 randomly selected relationships. Results suggest that Facebook networks are often large, butare composed of relatively weak relationships. Acquaintances, lapsed friendships, and “friends of others” account for over half of all Facebook contacts with another 20% representing relationships that are restricted to a particular setting. Most Facebook contacts reflected offline relational patterns. Approximately 10% of all contacts were judged by users as being very close or strong relationships. When placed in the context of the large size of many SNS networks, this figure raises intriguing questions about the link between social technologies and the total carrying capacity of human social networks.

2010 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 6820 words || 
Info
4. Burns, Kelli. "Brands Among Friends: An Examination of Brand Friending and Engagement on Facebook" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, The Denver Sheraton, Denver, CO, Aug 04, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p434946_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: When Facebook allowed companies to create profiles in November 2007, about 100,000 corporate users created a free page during the first 24 hours (Zukowski 2008). This study surveyed 112 Facebook members to understand the variables related to friending and engaging with brands. Facebook brand fans differ significantly from non-Facebook fans on several key variables. Also, Facebook fans who exhibit more engagement behaviors with a Facebook brand can be differentiated from those with fewer engagement behaviors.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 125 words || 
Info
5. Costello, Barbara. "Friends Don’t Let Friends . . . Or Do They? An Investigation of Positive Peer Pressure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-10-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p517273_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The extent to which friends can have a positive influece on each other’s behavior has only rarely been studied in criminology, and peer influence is seen as almost entirely criminogenic. This study presents a preliminary test of the hypothsis that those with higher levels of social and self-control are more likely to intervene in their friends behavior in prosocial ways. Data are drawn from two convenience samples of students at a Northeastern public university. Findings indicate that prosocial peer influence is common, with almost every respondent in the sample reporting some experience with either administering or receiving direct attempts from friends to prevent them from engaging in deviant behavior, and that control attempts are positively correlated with attachment to friends and other control theory variables.

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