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2010 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 11510 words || 
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1. Khoo, Guan-Soon. "To Friend or Not To Friend? How Facebook Can Make My Friend Request Decisions More Efficient" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 21, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p402317_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Should I accept or reject this friendship gesture? Can Facebook assist users in making friend request decisions more efficient? Our study explores the psychological implications of Facebook users’ friend request negotiations based on interface cues. A 3x2x2 mixed design experiment (N=246) was conducted at a large east coast university campus. We hypothesized correlations between types of friend request information (i.e. number of friends, number of mutual friends and presence of mutual interest) and acceptance likelihood, with popularity and attractiveness, common ground, compatibility, and curiosity as mediators. Our findings indicate that number of friends and number of mutual friends are significant factors for acceptance likelihood, and that curiosity and common ground are mediators in the relationship between number of mutual friends and acceptance likelihood. The theoretical and practical implications of these relationships are discussed and recommendations for future research & Facebook design are offered.

2011 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 125 words || 
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2. Costello, Barbara. "Friends Don’t Let Friends . . . Or Do They? An Investigation of Positive Peer Pressure" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 15, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p517273_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The extent to which friends can have a positive influece on each other’s behavior has only rarely been studied in criminology, and peer influence is seen as almost entirely criminogenic. This study presents a preliminary test of the hypothsis that those with higher levels of social and self-control are more likely to intervene in their friends behavior in prosocial ways. Data are drawn from two convenience samples of students at a Northeastern public university. Findings indicate that prosocial peer influence is common, with almost every respondent in the sample reporting some experience with either administering or receiving direct attempts from friends to prevent them from engaging in deviant behavior, and that control attempts are positively correlated with attachment to friends and other control theory variables.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Kleinnijenhuis, Jan., Hartmann, Tilo., Tanis, Martin. and van Hoof, Anita. "Friendly Parties Benefit From Friendly Media Because of Hostile Media Perceptions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1109099_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Single studies and meta-analyses alike provides evidence for a Hostile Media Effect (HME) which maintains that people with strong dispositions towards an issue perceive media content as biased against their opinions. Most experimental studies and survey studies did however not take media-party-parallelism into account, which is selective exposure of partisans to like-minded media, also labeled as the Friendly Media Phenomenon. Even reports in partisan media of one’s choice may however been perceived as hostile, especially when a wedge issue is at stake that is orthogonal to the factors that shape media choice and media-party parallelism. The study is based on content analysis data about media content and on survey data on media choice, media perceptions, and party choice in the 2014 European Elections in the Netherlands. The results shows that the HME occurs indeed for Dutch media with respect to the wedge issue of European integration.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 1 pages || Words: 404 words || 
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4. Deemer, Danielle. and Lobao, Linda. "Religion and Consumption: Does Denomination and Religiosity Affect Demand for Labor-friendly and Animal-welfare Friendly Products?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 07, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p305277_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Although sociologists have increasingly examined the role of religion in social life, few generalizable studies appraise its impacts on consumption-related attitudes and behavior—and virtually none consider how religious preference and religiosity affect consumers’ concern with social justice in the food sector. Ideological inclination (captured in religious preference) and religiosity (captured in frequency of church attendance) have long been known to impact political attitudes and degree of tolerance for social groups. In this paper, we extend this literature to two related issues of consumption: concern for the treatment of both workers and animals in the food industry. In addition to examining the religious correlates of these attitudes, we examine the degree to which concern for human welfare is related to concern with animal welfare. To examine these issues, we use a unique data set, a national-level survey of consumer attitudes and behavior (N=1200). We find that, in addition to socioeconomic and demographic variables, religious preference influences individuals’ concern both with labor and farm animal welfare. The most consistent relationship emerges for Catholics who tend to exhibit greater concern about social justice in the food sector. Evangelical Christians show little variation from other groups. Our findings also provide evidence to reject a common complaint that animal welfare supporters are more concerned about animals than people. Rather, the two concerns go hand-in-hand—consumers with an interest in labor-friendly products are also interested in animal-welfare-friendly products.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 189 words || 
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5. Monsour, Mike. "'You Say You Just Want to be Friends…But': Hidden Agendas and Second-Guessing the Stated Intentions of Cross-Sex Friends" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p367376_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Three hundred college students from a medium-sized urban university in the west completed a survey comprised of open-ended and close-ended items. This exploratory investigation was designed to determine the extent to which cross-sex friends contend with “hidden” sexual and romantic agendas initiated by their friendship partner. A hidden agenda exist when a member of the friendship, who claims to be content with being “just friends,” secretly desires for the friendship to be redefined as a romantic and/or sexual relationship. These hidden agendas, we speculate, are products of the well-documented emotional bond and sexual challenges which result from the prevailing heterosexist ideology that permeates American society and contextualizes and sexualizes cross-sex friendships. A second purpose of the investigation was to determine to what extent, if any, suspicious cross-sex friends engage in a cognitive process called “second-guessing,” in which they reinterpret, or second-guess, the stated intentions of the friend with the suspected hidden agenda. The study also examined use of specific communication strategies used to test the accuracy of the reinterpreted messages. The study forwards six research questions and will employ ANOVAS and MANOVAS in the statistical analysis of data.

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