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2016 - AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto Words: 248 words || 
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1. Ikeuchi, Suma. "Futures Lost, Futures Found: Pentecostal Conversion as the Making of New Future, or Why Nikkei Brazilian Migrants Convert in Japan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1104332_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Pentecostal Christianity has been the fastest growing branch of Christianity for the last few decades and, in its process of global expansion, reached one of the most unlikely places: Japan. While Christians barely make up 1% of the Japanese majority, Pentecostalism has been flourishing among Brazilian migrants – the country’s fourth-largest group of foreign residents. This paper argues that future is a key concept in the analysis of Pentecostal conversion among the migrants. In doing so, it will also engage larger issues, such as racialization of identity, national kinship, and transnationalism.
The majority of Brazilians in Japan are second- and third-generation Japanese descendants. As “return migrants” to the supposed ancestral homeland, they have grappled with the images of the past, present, and future in complex ways. I will illustrate the ways in which conversion addresses common concerns regarding time among the migrant converts, such as the “loss of future” in their post-migration life, “putting aside living” for the future in Brazil, and restoration of “modern minority” status in Japan. Pentecostal conversion in this context is often experienced as an act of re-envisioning the new future in spiritual terms. That is, spiritual fellowship mediated by Pentecostalism helps migrants transcend racialized ethnicity delineated by the “Japanese blood,” past-oriented national kinship, and world of national boundaries where they have long been place in in-between space of hyphenated identity. I will conclude with an observation that the experience of living “between” nations has sensitized Nikkei migrants to the vision of “transnational transcendence.”

2015 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 225 words || 
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2. Vodopivec, Maja. "How Do Past, Present, and Future Interact in the Post-3.11 Condition in Japan? Examining the ‘Future Past’ of Koppelion" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Hotel & Towers, Chicago, Illinois, Mar 26, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p953238_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The triple earthquake-tsunami-nuclear catastrophe of 11 March 2011, undoubtedly represents a turning point in Japan’s modern history, comparable only to the country’s defeat in the Second World War. While the nuclear disaster is still ongoing and poses a threat with unforeseeable consequences, it has accelerated a number of revisionist trends in Japanese politics and reopened debates about what the future of Japan may look like.
This paper will examine how politics has been constituted in Japan after the 3.11 by re-reading a pre-3.11 sci-fi comic that foreshadowed an irradiated future. Koppelion (2008-), a futuristic story about a 2036 nuclear catastrophe in Tokyo’s Odaiba district triggered by an earthquake, surprisingly speaks to the post-3.11 condition in multiple ways. The comic’s “future past” will be a tool through which this paper/presentation will address the following questions: What is the role of traditional time/space concepts (expressed in a present-ism and a national body strictly distinguishing inner and outer spaces) in understanding and criticizing the past and imagining possible futures? And how in a given present that is often characterised in Japanese critical circles as a massive historical amnesia, are the temporal dimensions of past and future, experience and expectation, related? How do these notions of past and future shape politics after the uncontrolled events of 3.11 and in the midst of the contemporary conservative political turn in Japan?

2015 - ASALH Centennial Annual Meeting and Conference Words: 122 words || 
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3. Cudjoe, Karen. "Black Families to the Future: Learning From the Past to Thrive in Future" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASALH Centennial Annual Meeting and Conference, Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Sep 23, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1038532_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Few, if any, would refute the notion that Black families have played a crucial role in sustaining many Black individuals, families and communities. At its best, Black families can be a powerful network of support for its members and a force in various societies around the world. African heritage has been referenced as being one of the factors that have helped sustain Black families. Further exploring one’s knowledge of traditional African practices could help further strengthen some of them. However, there a variety of social, political and economic factors that can thwart efforts of individuals to form and sustain viable Black families. A brief overview of a few of the factors will be presented.

2016 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 99 words || 
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4. Little, Karen. "(Other Peoples’) Children are the Future: Decolonizing Narratives of Futurity in Suzan-Lori Parks’s "In the Blood"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Palais des congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1142209_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: This paper examines Suzan-Lori Parks’s play In the Blood as a re-reading and re-circulation of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter wherein Parks contests dominant narratives in contemporary America. “The child” emblematizes futurity and yet neither racially, economically, and socially marginalized mothers nor their children inhabit the narratives of futurity that colonize the political landscape, which this paper treats as cruel optimism. Parks reveals an American lineage of epistemic violence wherein the state monopolizes “knowledge” about marginalized mothers and discursively produces them within rituals of penance and rehabilitation. Parks stages the violent rupture of one marginalized mother’s decolonial counter narrative.

2017 - ASEEES Convention Words: 108 words || 
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5. Jakovljevic, Branislav. "Future is Dreadful, it’s Good it doesn’t Exist; Future is Beautiful, it’s Too Bad it doesn’t Exist" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEEES Convention, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-08-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1266292_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The title of this paper paraphrases the main leitmotif Sreten Ugričić’s novel To an Unknown Hero. Published in 2010, the narrative of this novel is set in 2014 and focuses on Gavrilo Princip and his return on the centennial anniversary of his assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. Using Ugričić’s novel as a principal case study, this paper discusses the erosion of the historical vision in Serbian culture in the 20th century, and its replacement with what J.G. Ballard called the “myths of the near future.” This near future is strikingly dystopian and its main theme is the defeat of the past hopes for the future that has arrived.

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